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Youth Organized for Disaster Action PPP

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Information about Youth Organized for Disaster Action PPP
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Published on December 29, 2007

Author: Isab

Source: authorstream.com

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Youth Organized for Disaster Action:  Youth Organized for Disaster Action A Service-Learning Program Joan Liptrot, Executive Director Julia Wagner, Program Manager Kathia Monard Weissman Ph.D, Evaluator One of our country’s most valuable resources is its youth!:  One of our country’s most valuable resources is its youth! Y.O.D.A. is a service-learning program that helps young people prepare their families, schools, and communities for unexpected emergencies and disasters. Y.O.D.A is a project of the Institute for Global Education & Service Learning:  Y.O.D.A is a project of the Institute for Global Education & Service Learning In partnership with The New Jersey Commission for National & Community Service Penn SERVE: The Governors Office of Citizen Service With funding from a Learn & Serve America Grant through the Corporation for National & Community Service Slide4:  Current Grantees: New Foundations Charter School Philadelphia, PA Bristol Township School District Bristol, PA Lake-Lehman School District Harveys Lake, PA Coatesville School District Coatesville, PA Cranford School District Cranford, NJ Hoboken School District Hoboken, NJ Hoboken Charter School Hoboken, NJ Linden School District Linden, NJ Gloucester County Vocational-Technical School Gloucestor, NJ These grantees include: Urban, rural, and suburban districts Elementary, middle, and high school Regular education, special needs, gifted, and vo-tech students Slide5:  2 yr grants, $26,000 each year First round of grantees: Implement Youth Organized for Disaster Action service learning program in at least 2 school schools Assess and address unique homeland security needs through an student generated service-learning project Establish partnerships between at least 8 homeland security organizations, emergency management units, police or fire stations and at least three community based/faith based organizations and state and local Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters. Provide professional development opportunities to teachers and administrators Engage at least 15% of the total student population in homeland security service learning projects that are linked to the Core Curriculum Content Standards By the end of year two, YODA teams will have created and distributed 200 family disaster plans and emergency kits to families in their communities. Participate in a homeland security service project or event on one of the national days service. Link service activities to at least two of the seven academic content areas. Generate 25 new volunteer adults to participate in homeland security efforts. Recognize their students for their service activities via the President’s Student Service Award. Contribute to the creation of a Service Learning Homeland Security Handbook. Serve on grant review committee for YODA mini grants. Serve as a mentor to new YODA sites.       Slide6:  Second round of grantees: 1 yr grants, $5,000 each Assess and address unique homeland security needs through an student generated service-learning project Assemble and distribute 50 disaster preparedness kits Engage 15% of the student body in homeland security efforts including training and service to others. Link service activities to at least two (2) academic content areas. Partner with 2 homeland security organizations, emergency management units, the Red Cross, police or fire stations. Generate 5 new volunteer adults (other than teachers and staff) to participate in homeland security efforts. Recognize their students for their service activities via the President’s Student Service Awards. Participate assessment and evaluation of overall YODA performance measures. Conduct at least one (1) in-service training on service-learning and homeland security. During year 1, students learned academic skills as they::  During year 1, students learned academic skills as they: Prepared and distributed 1000 emergency kits in their community Assessed security and safety needs of their school Created emergency plans for their homes and schools Researched disasters and their effect on communities Learned first aid Taught others how to prepare for and respond to emergencies that could occur in their community Developed public service announcements about disaster preparedness for their local cable channel Wrote stories to help younger children understand what to do in an emergency Organized Health and Safety Fairs for their community Helped local flood victims Partnered with 150 community organizations, businesses, health and social service agencies and schools in their community Slide8:  Getting Started: Identify focus area: school or community 2. Research possible disasters: natural & manmade 3. Assess preparedness: surveys, interviews, research 4. Create an action plan: get training, develop partnerships, assemble and distribute kits, train others, develop other projects, etc.. Slide9:  Connecting to the Curriculum Connecting Emergency Kit creation to English/Language Arts: Writing pamphlets, brochures, and other educational materials related to the kits, their purpose, their use, and their distribution. Reading various research and best practices related to emergency management and kit creation and distribution Writing letters and communicating with various emergency management officials, corporations, etc to acquire donations, information, etc. Reading literature that comes out of a historical context related to disaster preparation and mitigation (i.e. Cold War and The Crucible) and connecting that to present-day situation Create emergency number card to put into the kit. Create an emergency plan for the kit’s population (students, teachers, families, elderly, etc.)   Slide10:  Connecting Emergency Kit creation to Math: Budgeting related to the creation of kits – i.e. how many kits will be created and distributed, what are the components of the kits, how much do those components cost, are there lower cost alternatives, how will we pay for these materials? Determining the eventual impact of kit distribution using mathematical models and systems analysis. Designing and implementing surveys and then analyzing the data to determine what types of kits are needed, what level of pre-existing knowledge exists related to kits and their uses, etc. Sort items that should be in an emergency kit versus items that do not need to be in the kit. Determine realistic prices for each item that should be in the kit.   Slide11:  Connecting Emergency Kit creation to Science: Understanding the science behind certain components of kits. Ex. Hand-cranked radio. This is a radio that can operate on power generated from hand-cranking rather than batteries (which may die) or electricity (which may be out during an emergency). But how does it work? Understanding the earth science, geology, meteorology, etc that lead to various natural disasters as background research to determining which disasters are more likely to occur in your area and thus determining which type of kit you should create and distribute. (i.e. no blizzard kits in Hawaii) Using the scientific method to evaluate the impact of the program – i.e. did this project work? Slide12:  Other Disaster Prevention/Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, Recovery Activities Receive and provide first aid training Conduct disaster drills Hold school/community safety fair Educate the others about disaster procedures i.e. Pamphlets, PSA, presentations Learn procedures for response to disasters, i.e.setting up volunteer centers, PODS (points of distribution for supplies), search & rescue Slide13:  More Disaster Prevention/Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, Recovery Activities Writing children’s books about disaster preparation and response Educating the community about options for pets during a disaster Participating in flood/fire mitigation activities in the community Hold a security/preparedness summit in school or community Translate emergency materials into other languages Create tools for gather information needed in a disaster (i,.e. magnets, document holder, etc.) Y.O.D.A. Evaluation:  Y.O.D.A. Evaluation Program goals for students: Increase students’ awareness of homeland security issues Increase their involvement in hometown safety projects Increase their academic & social engagement Evaluation Methods Pre- & post-questionnaires for students and teachers Interviews with students and program administrators Focus Groups Findings – Elementary :  Findings – Elementary All elementary school students (100%) agreed that they had learned: about emergency kit items how to provide first aid how respond to both natural and man-made disasters about their school’s evacuation plans to teach others how to respond to disasters Findings – Middle School:  Findings – Middle School Middle School students were more likely to agree with the following statements: I am aware of what I need to do in the event of a disaster I know my school’s plans for emergencies I have an emergency kit in my house I can show my neighbors how to prepare for a disaster I know how to provide first aid I can teach others how to avoid getting hurt during most types of disasters I know what I can do to make my community a safer place to live in Findings – Middle School:  Findings – Middle School Most middle school students reported that the program had an impact on increasing their: ability to work with others (90.9%) commitment to helping others (87.5%) ability to solve problems (86.0%) interest in community safety issues (84.6%) understanding of the problems in their community (84.6%) interest in learning new things (80.1%) attendance in school (73.7%) interest in school subjects (69.7%) Findings – High School:  Findings – High School High school students reported that the Y.O.D.A. program helped them learn: What is required in an emergency kit (92.5%) How to respond to natural and man-made disasters (85%) How teach others how to respond to disasters (74.9%) How to provide first aid (74.8%) About their school’s evaluation plans (72.2%) How to provide CPR (52.8%) Findings – High School:  Findings – High School The majority of the high school students indicated that the program helped them: become more interested in learning (93.0%) improve their ability to work with others (90.6%) and increased their: commitment to helping others (89.2%) ability to solve problems (88.0%) understanding of the problems in their community (85.5%) interest in community safety issues (84.4%) attendance in school (70.1%) interest in new subjects (68.0%) Awareness of hometown safety issues:  Awareness of hometown safety issues “Before we started this, we didn't know what to do for floods or anything, but coming out of this, now we're prepared and we know everything we need to do to keep us safe as well as everybody else in the community.” A middle school student “What I like the most about Y.O.D.A. is that when we get to help people, we get to teach them, but what we learned is that we can prepare other people besides ourselves, 'cuz we learned a lot. We can prepare people for something that happened in their house or around their neighborhood, like a blackout or something that happened to them.” - An elementary school student Academic skills:  Academic skills “I'm happy with what I learned because when I go to college, I want to study pre-med and so most of the things I learned here, I can take with me to college and I'll be able to apply it.” - A high school student “I think it gave the students a better appreciation for the importance of learning in science and health and how it can be put to a practical use. So what they're learning in school is not just book work, but now, also, they have a hands-on experience with it.” - A middle school teacher Social Engagement:  Social Engagement “It helped me to be able to speak in front of people because I was forced to do it, and now if I have to speak in front of somebody, I'm not really all scared no more.” A middle school student “I think my students improved their self-esteem through this whole thing. And nothing against all the things that they did, because they did wonderful things, but that they can actually stand up there and teach kids and tell them, and they were in charge. I think that was the best that could happen for these kids. I really do.” - A high school teacher Questions?:  Questions? Homeland Security/Disaster Preparedness Resources American Red Cross www.redcross.org Master’s of Disaster Curriculum & Facing Fear Curriculum   Federal Emergency Management Agency www.fema.gov Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program: educates people about disaster preparedness: http://training.fema.gov/emiweb/CERT Posters, videos and other free things available by calling, toll-free, 1-800-480-2520   Citizen Corps www.citizencorps.gov    National Weather Service www.nws.noaa.gov/   Center for Disease Control and Prevention www.cdc.gov/   U.S. Geological Survey www.usgs.gov   Department of Homeland Security www.dhs.gov   National Crime Prevention Council http://www.ncpc.org/   For more information about Y.O.D.A. Youth Organized for Disaster Action:  For more information about Y.O.D.A. Youth Organized for Disaster Action Visit our website at www.igesl.org Joan Liptrot, Executive Director Julia Wagner, Program Manager Kathia Monard Weissman Ph.D, Evaluator

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