Yangon, Botahtaung Pagoda1

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Information about Yangon, Botahtaung Pagoda1
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Published on March 11, 2014

Author: michaelasanda

Source: slideshare.net

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The Botataung Pagoda (literally "1000 military officers") is a famous pagoda located in downtown Yangon, Myanmar, near the Yangon River. The pagoda was first built by the Mon around the same time as was Shwedagon Pagoda—according to local belief, over 2500 years ago, and was known as Kyaik-de-att in Mon language. The pagoda is hollow within, and houses what is believed to be a sacred hair of Gautama Buddha.

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The Botataung Pagoda (literally "1000 military officers") is a famous pagoda located in downtown Yangon, Myanmar, near the Yangon river. The pagoda was first built by the Mon around the same time as was Shwedagon Pagoda—according to local belief, over 2500 years ago, and was known as Kyaik-de-att in Mon language. The pagoda is hollow within, and houses what is believed to be a sacred hair of Gautama Buddha.

Considered one of the three major worship sites in Yangon (the other two being Shwedagon and Sule Pagoda), Botahtaung features quirky charms and peculiarities.

Located on the bank of the Yangon River, Botahtaung is a typical gilded dome that tapers gradually to the top and is capped by a symbolic fan-shape spire. Unlike many pagodas (known as zedi in Myanmar), Botahtaung is hollow inside allowing visitors to walk through to admire what is considered the highlight of any pilgrimage – a glass case containing a sacred hair relic of the Buddha

There are eight shrines, one for each day of the week (in the Burmese calendar, Wednesday is divided into two parts), and most Burmese pray at their day shrine when visiting a pagoda. If you can figure out the day of the week when you were born, light a candle, place some flowers, or pour water over the shrine corresponding to that day. Each shrine also has a beast associated with it. Monday (Moon), Tiger, Direction East. The day that one has born is the most important in daily life in Myanmar. Every individual soul is being named after the day that he or she has born. Thus in Myanmar history there is no generation hand down by the family name since Myanmar does not carry family names. For example if you were born on Monday and are named Maung Kyi Win, that doesn't mean that your name is Maung and your family name is Kyi Win, but it is simply because that you were born on Monday of the week. Thus your other family member may born different days of the week and all will have different names in possess.

The pagoda was completely destroyed on 8 November 1943 when the RAF, which was bombing the nearby Yangon wharves, also hit the pagoda. The pagoda was left in "blackened ruins" Rebuilding of the pagoda started on the same day that the country gained independence from the UK: 4 January 1948.

The new pagoda is of original design and in height 131 ft. 8 inch (40.13200 m), on a base of 96 ft. x 96 ft. (29.26 meters x 29.26 meters)

The main attraction is the stupa's hollow inside, which has a mirrored maze-like walkway lined with glass showcases containing many ancient relics and artifacts that were sealed inside the earlier pagoda

covered bridge

There is a large pond with fish and turtles feeding on popcorns, which is on sale conveniently nearby. A covered bridge leads visitors to a shrine of a few resident Nats (guardian spirits) who cast their protective sight over the temple grounds.

The Nats, who form an important part of most religious monuments in Myanmar, can allegedly grant wishes and fulfil dreams. Nats are said to be fond of young coconuts and bananas. Offerings in the form of money are widely practiced.

Bo Bo Gyi (lit. "great grandfather") traditionally refers to the name of a guardian spirit (called nat) unique to each Burmese Buddhist temple or pagoda.

Bo Bo Gyi is typically depicted as a nearly life-sized elderly man, dressed in a curved cap and sometimes carrying a cane, to signify old age. Offerings of scarves and paso (longyis worn by males are called paso) are common by worshipers.

Text: Internet Pictures: Sanda Foi oreanuş & Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foi oreanuş www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Sound Saung Zaw Win Maung- Thet-Wai (the sharet of one's life)

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