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Published on January 5, 2008

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SMST120A-06 Wk3 Lec3: Imagination and diversity:  SMST120A-06 Wk3 Lec3: Imagination and diversity Revision: Explored ideas of what creativity & CIs are Looked at TNC exhibition & read catalogue for ideas Illustrated how humans are born with creative DNA & rewired misconceptions of creativity as special and restricted to unique individuals Introduced mind mapping and MindManager Preview:  Preview Linking creativity & diversity Through Renaissance & intersections Examining lessons from Johans Through Clegg & Birch’s imagination mapping Learning from Renaissance & Johannson’s intersections:  Learning from Renaissance & Johannson’s intersections Revisit Renaissance as earlier example of what might be called creative industries/business Identify key aspects of that period Draw parallels with the present Look at lessons and examples from Johansson Renaissance as intersection (1): After the middle ages:  Renaissance as intersection (1): After the middle ages Rebirth from a “world lit only by fire,” “nasty, brutish, and short” with an average life expectancy of about 27 years End of centuries of serfdom & superstition Life on earth counts as well as heaven Open to idea of human potential, genius, ability to remake world for humans Literally “reborn” into the world and at a transforming time Renaissance as intersection (2): Discoveries & globalisation:  Renaissance as intersection (2): Discoveries & globalisation Origins of knowledge society in inventions: pencil, inexpensive paper, and printing press Knowledge could be recorded & transmitted across generations & available to many citizens The astrolobe, magnetic compass, & large sailing ships End of flat earthers –> new ideas & cultures Early globalisation and movements to democracy Long-range cannon & hi-tech business/war Renaissance as intersection (3): Discoveries and worldly goods:  Renaissance as intersection (3): Discoveries and worldly goods Artists, intellectuals, merchants, politicians, & scientists entered an intersection Converged in creative explosions in art, business, culture, science, and technology Market values: “A painter’s reputation rested on his [sic] ability to arouse commercial interest in his works of art, not on some intrinsic criteria of intellectual worth” (Lisa Jardine in Worldly Goods: A New History of the Renaissance). Renaissance as intersection (4): Parallels and promos:  Renaissance as intersection (4): Parallels and promos Contemporary parallels: “the national boundaries between politics, culture, technology, finance, national security and ecology are disappearing” (Tom Friedman in The Lexus and the Olive Tree). “Diversity in ideas and experiences breeds the remarkable fruit of invention. . . . Johansson has brought this simple notion to us in a way that is entertaining, informative and very valuable. Drop what you're doing and read it!” (Dr. Gil Amelio, Former CEO, Apple Computers & National Semiconductor) Intersection (1): Johansson’s (2004) Medici Effect’s lessons (121-142):  Intersection (1): Johansson’s (2004) Medici Effect’s lessons (121-142) Franz Johansson lives in New York as a consultant, entrepreneur, & writer (www.themedicieffect.com) Focus on idea intersections and showing how to: Break down associative barriers & re-view problems Randomly, but purposefully, combine diverse concepts Walk away from familiar concepts & go into unknown Execute beyond failures to make intersectional ideas happen Pre-corporate options: Medici defined “good taste”:  Pre-corporate options: Medici defined “good taste” Wealthy Tuscany family in Florence who sponsored the artists and inventors after the middle ages. Michelangelo Raphael Leonardo Da Vinci Galileo Patronage nurturing creatives -> innovation when adopted by group Check creative intersecting:  Check creative intersecting Design a slogan and a logo for SMST120A Form a group, share your ideas, then again design a SMST120A slogan & logo Compare & contrast the individual & group efforts How did the group affect the outcome? Were there any interesting intersections and, if so, what were they? Communication barriers:  Communication barriers “Defensive routines are thoughts and actions used to protect individuals, groups, and organizations’ usual way of dealing with reality” (Argyris, 1990) Michelangelo.com Innovative Website Design Pre-corporate sponsors: De Medici:  Pre-corporate sponsors: De Medici   The Medici were well-known for their personal as well as professional dalliances. Lorenzo's brother, Giuliano de Medici, famously impregnated his mistress before his brutal murder in 1478. Their child, Giulio de'Medici, was later crowned Pope Clement VII. Clement took a black slave girl as a mistress. Their child, Allessandro, became the first black head of state when he was made Duke of Florence in 1530. But he met a sticky end - stabbed to death by his own cousin after an argument over a woman. Pope Leo X had more exotic tastes. Famed for his extravagant lifestyle, he was entertained by young boys leaping naked from cakes. When the new Pope entered Florence in triumph, he had a young boy painted gold, from head to toe, who paraded through the streets. It was pure propaganda, implying the return of a golden age under the rule of the Medici. Intersection (2): Examples from The Medici Effect:  Intersection (2): Examples from The Medici Effect Intersection with difference => innovation E.g., Emotions of Shrek: Steve Jobs on Pixar: “computer animation . . . . frees our animators from drawing so that they can concentrate on acting, breathing life into their characters as they move. This allows Pixar to hire animators who may or may not excel at drawing, but are brilliant actors. Our animators even take acting lessons”. New 3D animation shows feelings as part of the third dimension rather than simple expressions and within a few years 2D cartoons were in trouble & The Incredibles won a 2005 Oscar Intersection (2): Lessons from The Medici Effect (continued):  Intersection (2): Lessons from The Medici Effect (continued) 2. Work with diverse groups of people The Enigma project. British WW2 codebreakers broke German’s code Cryptologists, codemakers and codebreakers, traditionally came from linguistics Enigma group contained mathematicians (including Alan Turing), scientists, chess grand masters, and crossword addicts. Intersection (3): Lessons from The Medici Effect (continued):  Intersection (3): Lessons from The Medici Effect (continued) 3. Go intersection hunting E.g., Engineers wanted to remove ice from power lines safely and efficiently. When badly stuck they took a “thought walk” round their hotel. One came back with a jar of honey, another suggested putting honey on top of each pole and climbing bears would shake ice free. That vibration idea led to final solution of helicopters hovering over lines to shake ice free. Intersection (4): More Medici Effect examples:  Intersection (4): More Medici Effect examples 3. Reverse assumptions A restaurant with no menu: Chefs inform customer of that day’s ingredients & they create meal from the ingredients the customer selects A restaurant which doesn’t charge for food: Café style venue where people meet to talk/work & pay per hour they stay with some free low cost items A restaurant that doesn’t serve food: Unique décor in exotic environment. People bring their own picnics and pay a service charge for location/entertainment Intersection (5): More lessons from The Medici Effect :  Intersection (5): More lessons from The Medici Effect 4. Handle failure and don’t avoid risk Some business guidelines Make sure people know that failure to carry out ideas is unacceptable Learn from past failures Be suspicious of people with low failure rates. They are probably not taking enough risks or hiding their failures and thus no one else is learning from them. Employ/cultivate people who have had intelligent failures Summary of Johannson:  Summary of Johannson Considered Renaissance as an earlier period of creative industries/business Identified key aspects of that period Drew parallels with the present Looked at lessons and examples from Johannson in readings and from elsewhere in his book Suggested that to get ahead you must take risks and accept some public failures Clegg & Birch’s Imagination Engineering (pp. 105-123):  Clegg & Birch’s Imagination Engineering (pp. 105-123) Brian Clegg: Has Masters degrees in Natural Sciences and Operational Research Worked for British Airways (BA) and wrote creativity software for them Writes business books and columns for PC Week & Personal Computer World Sings in several choirs Paul Birch: Also worked for BA in Operational Research, IT, Marketing Finance, Strategy & Corporate Jester. Now runs creativity consultancy Clegg & Birch (1): Background:  Clegg & Birch (1): Background Brian Clegg: Has Masters degrees in Natural Sciences and Operational Research Worked for British Airways (BA) and wrote creativity software for them Writes business books and columns for PC Week & Personal Computer World Sings in several choirs Paul Birch: Also worked for BA in Operational Research, IT, Marketing Finance, Strategy & Corporate Jester. Now runs creativity consultancy Clegg & Birch (2): Imagination Engineering (pp. 105-123):  Clegg & Birch (2): Imagination Engineering (pp. 105-123) Survey chap. in 120 reader & 3 other stages: Stage 1: Building (overcomes obstacles by): Tunnel (push through obstacles by, e.g., challenging assumptions, reviewing facts, reversing relationships) Bridge (look at problems from a different direction, indulging in fantasy, seeing from someone else’s eyes, applying a metaphor) By-pass (use a secondary destination to get around blockages, Tries random work or picture association) Finding new destination Clegg & Birch (3): Stage 3 Waymarking:  Clegg & Birch (3): Stage 3 Waymarking When route is established we need to mark the way, refining and clarifying. Can generate extra building and may be public or private. Waymarking techniques: Slip road – slimming down possible solutions Washroom – purely subjective judgment: what do you feel about it? Viewpoints – considering all stakeholders’ views Signposts – looking at everything that is good and achievements to date Hazard markers – Looking at possible snags/risks and how to get round them/minimise them Clegg & Birch (4): Stage 4 Navigating:  Clegg & Birch (4): Stage 4 Navigating Having established practicality now execute. Different approaches for different journeys: Highway – Obvious path and no need for detailed plan. Requires a clear road with milestones (slip roads available for unexpected detours) Country lane – No obvious path & needs more flexible planning. Think each stage individually Railway – Someone else is driving but need for all to keep track of progress. Agree route and stations to monitor that your going in right direction River – Very long and meandering goals, where journey is daunting. Can only be done a stroke at a time and holding firmly to destination/goal Clegg & Birch: Summary:  Clegg & Birch: Summary Provided context to Survey chap. in 120 reader Looked at different stages and considered metaphor as stimulation Explored how to move on from surveying to next stages by Building Waymarking Navigating

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