WiG 2007 The Performance of Play - Ludica

100 %
0 %
Information about WiG 2007 The Performance of Play - Ludica

Published on May 29, 2007

Author: shenerd

Source: slideshare.net

Description

Jacki Morie
Playing Dress-Up: Costumes, roleplay and imagination
USC Institute for Creative Technologies

Playing Dress-Up: Costumes, roleplay and imagination Janine Fron (art)n Tracy Fullerton USC School of Cinematic Arts Jacquelyn Ford Morie USC Institute for Creative Technologies Celia Pearce Georgia Institute of Technology Ludica

What is Ludica? Women’s game art and design collective formed in 2005 Mission To address issues of gender in games through practice and theory To promote a more female-friendly and gender-aware environment in games, game-creation and game studies

Women’s game art and design collective formed in 2005

Mission

To address issues of gender in games through practice and theory

To promote a more female-friendly and gender-aware environment in games, game-creation and game studies

Dress-Up: Overview A significant female play pattern, also practiced by males Traditional childhood play, increasingly appears in adult play, both in analog and digital forms Growing role in digital play forms

A significant female play pattern, also practiced by males

Traditional childhood play, increasingly appears in adult play, both in analog and digital forms

Growing role in digital play forms

Dress-Up & “Classic” Game Studies Largely ignored in classic game studies Huizinga: Dionysian Festivals Men & fashion in the Baroque period: the periwig Caillois Girls’ play is primarily preparation for motherhood Make-believe/“mimicry”

Largely ignored in classic game studies

Huizinga:

Dionysian Festivals

Men & fashion in the Baroque period: the periwig

Caillois

Girls’ play is primarily preparation for motherhood

Make-believe/“mimicry”

Dress-up play can fall into Caillois’ definitions of both ludus and paidia activities Tends in the direction of paidia Ludic bias in both the game industry and game studies may be one reason why this play pattern is under-studied Ludus vs. Paidia

Dress-up play can fall into Caillois’ definitions of both ludus and paidia activities

Tends in the direction of paidia

Ludic bias in both the game industry and game studies may be one reason why this play pattern is under-studied

Mimicry Caillois defines mimicry as “…a diverse series of manifestations, the common element of which is that the subject makes believe or make others believe that he is someone other than himself. He forgets, disguises or temporarily sheds his personality in order to feign another.” (Caillois, 1958, p.19) According to Caillois, mimicry is compatible with both ludus and paidia

Caillois defines mimicry as “…a diverse series of manifestations, the common element of which is that the subject makes believe or make others believe that he is someone other than himself. He forgets, disguises or temporarily sheds his personality in order to feign another.” (Caillois, 1958, p.19)

According to Caillois, mimicry is compatible with both ludus and paidia

Caillois: “…acts of mimicry tend to cross the border between childhood and adulthood. The pleasure lies in being or passing for another.…the mask disguises the conventional self and liberates the personality” (Caillois 1958, p.19) Children dress as adults Adults engage in dress-up play Mimicry

Caillois: “…acts of mimicry tend to cross the border between childhood and adulthood. The pleasure lies in being or passing for another.…the mask disguises the conventional self and liberates the personality” (Caillois 1958, p.19)

Children dress as adults

Adults engage in dress-up play

What is Dress-Up? Examples of dress-up “play” Mardi Gras Halloween “ Trekkies” DragonCon Faerie Balls Reenactment/Renaissance Fairs Burning Man “ cosplay” (Japan) Key features: Establishment of a “theme” Sanctioned events

Examples of dress-up “play”

Mardi Gras

Halloween

“ Trekkies”

DragonCon

Faerie Balls

Reenactment/Renaissance Fairs

Burning Man

“ cosplay” (Japan)

Key features:

Establishment of a “theme”

Sanctioned events

Modes of Digital Dress-Up Doll-Play Identity/Roleplay

Doll-Play

Dress-Up Mechanics

Armor/Instrumental Clothing has a point value and a direct bearing on gameplay Often couched in masculine terms such as “gear” Also relates to another mechanic: inspecting

Clothing has a point value and a direct bearing on gameplay

Often couched in masculine terms such as “gear”

Also relates to another mechanic: inspecting

Acquiring/Trying Clothes Requires affordance for trading/buying Typical MMOGs no point value Exceptions: There.com Fashionista points and avatar appearance rating in Second Life

Requires affordance for trading/buying

Typical MMOGs no point value

Exceptions: There.com Fashionista points and avatar appearance rating in Second Life

Fashion Design/Creation Player-created skins for The Sims and The Sims 2 Example of “productive play.” Where affordances are present, effect is a literal explosion of player-created content In the realm of fashion, often dominated by females

Player-created skins for The Sims and The Sims 2

Example of “productive play.”

Where affordances are present, effect is a literal explosion of player-created content

In the realm of fashion, often dominated by females

Fashion Design/Creation Creative fashion and avatar design in Second Life

Creative fashion and avatar design in Second Life

Fashion Design/Creation Creative fashion kluges in There.com Hoop skirt hoverpacks Skirt made from pants

Creative fashion kluges in There.com

Twinking/Gifting/Trading Practice of higher-level players giving free stuff to lower-level players Requires affordance for trading Different significance depending on the game Only known example of point value: Game Neverending “Karma Points” There.com has public gifting feature Public “twinking” in There.com

Practice of higher-level players giving free stuff to lower-level players

Requires affordance for trading

Different significance depending on the game

Only known example of point value: Game Neverending “Karma Points”

There.com has public gifting feature

Childhood & Adult Play/Ritual

To be myself…I need the illumination of other people’s eyes, and therefore cannot be entirely sure what is my self. -- Bernard from Virginia Woolf’s The Waves

Real-World Costume Play A growing phenomenon worldwide, especially among adults Wide array of dress-up practices, from cosplay, to historical reenactment, to fantasy themes such as DragonCon and Faerie Balls Co-performative experience of “seeing and being seen”

A growing phenomenon worldwide, especially among adults

Wide array of dress-up practices, from cosplay, to historical reenactment, to fantasy themes such as DragonCon and Faerie Balls

Co-performative experience of “seeing and being seen”

Real-World Costume Play In Japan, children’s media is a growing site of adult culture, perhaps providing relief from the routine of work and domestic chores. (Mimi Ito, 2006) Japanese women engaging in “cosplay”

In Japan, children’s media is a growing site of adult culture, perhaps providing relief from the routine of work and domestic chores. (Mimi Ito, 2006)

Real-World Costume Play

Kimberly Miller Qualitative and quantitative research on reenactment and gender Found that women were more comfortable with terms like “costume,” and felt everyday fashion was also a from of dress-up while men veered away from such terminology and preferred terms such as “historical” and “garb” Hypothesized that costume play also allows men to wear weapons in public ( Gender Comparisons within Reenactment Costume, 1998 )

Qualitative and quantitative research on reenactment and gender

Found that women were more comfortable with terms like “costume,” and felt everyday fashion was also a from of dress-up while men veered away from such terminology and preferred terms such as “historical” and “garb”

Hypothesized that costume play also allows men to wear weapons in public

Reenactment Renaissance Faire denizens (Courtesy of Pendragon Costumes)

Kimberly Miller Theoretical framework Symbolic interactionsim (Mead, Blumer, Goffman): fashion as communication/expression Stone: “fantastic socialization” vs. “anticipatory socialization” Eicher: Three selves: Public Private Secret ( Dress-Up: Private and Secret Self-Expression 1997)

Theoretical framework

Symbolic interactionsim (Mead, Blumer, Goffman): fashion as communication/expression

Stone: “fantastic socialization” vs. “anticipatory socialization”

Eicher: Three selves:

Public

Private

Secret

Fantastic Socialization The Labyrinth of Jareth, Fantasy Masquerade Ball, Los Angeles, June 2006

Ritual Victor Turner Liminoid vs. Liminal Space Erving Goffman “ Interaction ritual” or “ritual games” Catherine Bell Social construction of self-image Richard Schechner Performance, roleplay, improvisation, “putting on” a character

Victor Turner

Liminoid vs. Liminal Space

Erving Goffman

“ Interaction ritual” or “ritual games”

Catherine Bell

Social construction of self-image

Richard Schechner

Performance, roleplay, improvisation, “putting on” a character

Ritual Burning Man

Digital Dress-Up

T.L. Taylor “Multiple Pleasures” (2003) Community and Socialization Identity Play Mastery & Status Exploration Team Sport/Combat In games like EverQuest and World of Warcraft (right) status is indicated not only by the type of clothing but by its amount. Level 1 Warrior Decked out Level 60 player

Community and Socialization

Identity Play

Mastery & Status

Exploration

Team Sport/Combat

Playing with (and Against) Gender

Trouble with Gender Representation Examples of “Kombat Lingerie”

Gender Extremes Taylor describes designers “impoverished view of online embodiment” Reports many women must bracket or ignore their ambivalent feelings about their avatars in order to enjoy the game. (2003) EverQuest player: “Who would go into battle in a thong bikini?” May have economic ramifications, as Chung reports people spend less money on their avatar the less they like/relate to it. (2005)

Taylor describes designers “impoverished view of online embodiment”

Reports many women must bracket or ignore their ambivalent feelings about their avatars in order to enjoy the game. (2003)

EverQuest player: “Who would go into battle in a thong bikini?”

May have economic ramifications, as Chung reports people spend less money on their avatar the less they like/relate to it. (2005)

Constructing Gender … .clothes…change our view of the world and the world’s view of us…So, having now worn skirts for a considerable time, a certain change was visible in Orlando…. If we compare the picture of Orlando as a man with that of Orlando as a woman we shall see that though both are undoubtedly one and the same person, there are certain changes. The man has his hand free to seize his sword, the woman must use hers to keep the satins from slipping from her shoulders. — Virginia Woolf , Orlando , 1928, p. 132 Gender is always a doing, though not a doing by a subject who might be said to preexist the deed…There is no gender identity behind the expressions of gender; that identity is performatively constituted by the very 'expressions' that are said to be its results. — Judith Butler 1990, Gender Trouble , p.25

… .clothes…change our view of the world and the world’s view of us…So, having now worn skirts for a considerable time, a certain change was visible in Orlando…. If we compare the picture of Orlando as a man with that of Orlando as a woman we shall see that though both are undoubtedly one and the same person, there are certain changes. The man has his hand free to seize his sword, the woman must use hers to keep the satins from slipping from her shoulders.

Gender swapping Gender play in MMOGs most common among heterosexual men Very little research with the exception of Nick Yee, who hypothesizes (Norrathian Scrolls, 2003): Social gender boundaries more stringent in real life for men. Female avatars are “twinked” more often/treated better Strategic advantage of being “perceived” as weaker, even though instrumentally they are not Another form of dominating the female body Most common reason cited by male players for gender-bending is that they like the way the avatar looks

Gender play in MMOGs most common among heterosexual men

Very little research with the exception of Nick Yee, who hypothesizes (Norrathian Scrolls, 2003):

Social gender boundaries more stringent in real life for men.

Female avatars are “twinked” more often/treated better

Strategic advantage of being “perceived” as weaker, even though instrumentally they are not

Another form of dominating the female body

Most common reason cited by male players for gender-bending is that they like the way the avatar looks

Conclusions Dress-Up and Costume play a growing aspect of both analog and digital play Discussion of dress-up broadens the discourse beyond male-centric games, mechanics and play patterns Conflation of computer with dress-up attracts women and creates a more male-friendly ethos Dress-up and roleplay, a vital aspect of nonwestern cultures, is being reclaimed in both the West and East Beyond merely entertainment or escape, Dress-Up is a highly human and transformative need

Dress-Up and Costume play a growing aspect of both analog and digital play

Discussion of dress-up broadens the discourse beyond male-centric games, mechanics and play patterns

Conflation of computer with dress-up attracts women and creates a more male-friendly ethos

Dress-up and roleplay, a vital aspect of nonwestern cultures, is being reclaimed in both the West and East

Beyond merely entertainment or escape, Dress-Up is a highly human and transformative need

Women in Games Newport Wales April 2007 [email_address]

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Wig, | LinkedIn

Fred Wig Wig. Fred Wig Wig--View More View Less. View Profile. wig wig. wig wig Nachrichtentechniker bei TA Austria. Austria area. Information Technology ...
Read more

Wig | LinkedIn

Fred Wig Wig. Fred Wig Wig--View More View Less. View Profile. wig wig. wig wig Nachrichtentechniker bei TA Austria. Austria area. Information Technology ...
Read more

Express Yourself: An Affective Analysis of Game Cosplayers ...

125 Express Yourself: An Affective Analysis of Game Cosplayers Nicolle Lamerichs ... The wig, which I dyed myself ... In Situated Play, Proceedings of ...
Read more

Playing Dress-Up: Costumes, roleplay and imagination - Ludica

Playing Dress-Up: Costumes, roleplay and imagination ... 19th-21st April 2007 University of Wales, Newport Ludica Janine ... to the sphere of girls’ play.
Read more

When Keeping it Real Goes Wrong: Resident Evil 5, Racial ...

... RESIDENT EVIL 5, RACIAL REPRESENTATION, ... Ludica (2007) suggests that games ... Text as mask: Gender, play, and performance on the Internet. In S ...
Read more

GRETA Journal 2007 by Rosario Reyes Márquez - issuu

... GRETA Journal 2007, Author: Rosario Reyes Márquez, Name: 2007_complete-new-, ... Revista para profesores de Inglés Año 2007 • vol. 15 • n os 1y2
Read more

Er ist wieder da by Timur Vermes — Reviews, Discussion ...

... modern Berlin. He is recognised instantly by those he crosses but nobody takes him seriously taking him for an actor or performance artist.
Read more

From a makeup fashion show in Beijing in 2007. Designing ...

From a makeup fashion show in Beijing in 2007. Designing these costumes would be the most awesome job ever. | See more about Beijing, ...
Read more