Waste To Energy (WtE) Market Outlook 2016-2026

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Information about Waste To Energy (WtE) Market Outlook 2016-2026

Published on July 12, 2016

Author: Visiongain

Source: slideshare.net

1. ©notice This material is copyright by visiongain. It is against the law to reproduce any of this material without the prior written agreement of visiongain.You cannot photocopy, fax, download to database or duplicate in any other way any of the material contained in this report. Each purchase and single copy is for personal use only. Waste to Energy (WtE) Market Outlook 2016-2026 Capacity (tpa) & CAPEX ($m) Forecasts for Incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) & Refuse-Derived Fuel (RDF) in Electricity Generation, District Heating & Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Energy from Waste (EfW) Plants; Featuring Technologies: Mass Burn, Gasification, Pyrolysis, Fluidised Bed, Advanced Thermal Treatment (ATT), & Advanced Conversion Technology (ACT)

2. www.visiongain.com Contents 1. Executive Summary 1.1 Global Waste-to-Energy Market Overview 1.2 Waste-to-Energy Market Definition 1.3 Global Waste-to-Energy Market Segmentation 1.4 Methodology 1.5 How This Report Delivers 1.6 Why You Should Read This Report 1.7 Key Questions Answered by This Analytical Report 1.8 Who is This Report For? 1.9 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) 1.10 Other Visiongain Reports 1.11 About Visiongain 2. Introduction to the Waste-to-Energy Market 2.1 Waste-to-Energy Technologies 2.2 The Characteristics and Evolution of MSW Management 3. The Global Waste-to-Energy Market 2016-2026 3.1 The Global Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 3.2 The Leading National and Regional Waste-to-Energy Market 2016-2026 3.3 Global Waste-to-Energy Market Drivers & Restraints 3.2.1 The Issues with Increased Population Growth and Urbanization 3.2.2 Can Waste-to-Energy Provide Added Energy Security? 3.2.3 Will Landfill Continue? 3.2.4 Do the Economics of Waste-to-Energy Stack Up? 3.2.5 High Costs and Limited Funding: Restraints for the Waste-to-Energy Market 3.2.6 Are Government Policies Driving the Waste-to-Energy Market? 3.2.7 Pollution, NIMBYism, Recycling: Public Opposition to Waste-to-Energy 3.3.8 A Balanced Argument: An Outlook for Waste-to-Energy 4. The European Waste-to-Energy Market 2016-2026 4.1 A Summary of the Legislation Impacting the European Waste-to-Energy Market 4.2 The UK Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 4.2.1 Current Status of Waste-to-Energy in the UK 4.2.2 Drivers and Restraints in the UK Waste-to-Energy Market 4.2.3 High Landfill Costs Continue to Drive the UK WtE Market 4.2.4 Is Environmental Legislation Pressuring the WtE Market? 4.2.5 LATS and Waste Infrastructure Grants are Shelved

3. www.visiongain.com Contents 4.2.6 Fears of Overcapacity and European Competition 4.2.7 Government Policy Focusing on Reduction and Recycling 4.2.8 The Impact of Public Opposition 4.2.9 Major UK Waste-to-Energy Projects 4.3 The Polish Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 4.3.1 Current Status of Waste-to-Energy in Poland 4.3.2 Drivers and Restraints in the Polish Waste-to-Energy Market 4.3.3 The Effect of New Legislation and National Targets on Poland’s Waste-to-Energy Market 4.3.4 Will Funding Support and PPPs Aid Waste-to-Energy? 4.3.5 New Processes and Legal Uncertainties: Can Poland Still Attract Investment? 4.3.6 Major Polish Waste-to-Energy Projects 4.4 The Irish Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 4.4.1 Current Status of Waste-to-Energy in Ireland 4.4.2 The Irish Waste-to-Energy Market’s Growth Potential 4.4.3 Major Irish Waste-to-Energy Projects 4.5 The Danish Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 4.5.1 Current Status of Waste-to-Energy in Denmark 4.5.2 Drivers and Restraints in the Danish Waste-to-Energy Market 4.5.3 A History of Incineration: Denmark’s Energy Recovery Past 4.5.4 Is Denmark Going to Focus More on Recycling? 4.5.5 Inefficiencies in the Danish WtE Market 4.5.6 Major Danish Waste-to-Energy Projects 4.6 The Finnish Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 4.6.1 Current Status of Waste-to-Energy in Finland 4.6.2 Drivers and Restraints in the Finnish Waste-to-Energy Market 4.6.3 Is a Tough Waste Plan Prompting Improvement in Finland? 4.6.4 Finland’s Waste-to-Energy Market is Restricted 4.6.5 Major Finnish Waste-to-Energy Projects 4.7 The Italian Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 4.7.1 Current Status of Waste-to-Energy in Italy 4.7.2 Drivers and Restraints in the Italian Waste-to-Energy Market 4.7.3 Will Italian Targets Force the Waste-to-Energy Market to Grow? 4.7.4 Are Restraining Factors Going to Inhibit the Italian Market? 4.7.5 Major Italian Waste-to-Energy Projects 4.8 The Swedish Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 4.8.1 Current Status of Waste-to-Energy in Sweden

4. www.visiongain.com Contents 4.8.2 Drivers and Restraints in the Swedish Waste-to-Energy Market 4.8.3 Major Swedish Waste-to-Energy Projects 4.9 The Czech Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 4.9.1 Current Status of Waste-to-Energy in Czech Republic Market 4.9.2 Prospects for the Czech Waste-to-Energy Market 4.9.3 Major Czech Waste-to-Energy Projects 4.10 Rest of Europe Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 4.10.1 The Rest of Europe Waste-to-Energy Projects 4.10.2 The Emerging Markets of Eastern Europe 4.10.3 The Developed Markets of Northern and Western Europe 5. The Asia-Pacific Waste-to-Energy Market 2016-2026 5.1 The Chinese Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 5.1.1 Current Status of the Chinese Waste-to-Energy Market 5.1.2 Drivers and Restraints in the Chinese Waste-to-Energy Market 5.1.3 Rising Levels of Waste and Pollution Causing Issues in China 5.1.4 Rising Energy Demand Could Lead to an Increase in Waste-to-Energy 5.1.5 The 12th Five Year Plan and the CDM as Drivers 5.1.6 What are the Issues with the Waste-to-Energy Plants in China? 5.1.7 Public Opposition: The Fight Against Incineration in China 5.1.8 Major Chinese Waste-to-Energy Projects 5.2 The Japanese Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 5.2.1 Current Status of Waste-to-Energy in Japan 5.2.2 Drivers and Restraints in the Japanese Waste-to-Energy Market 5.2.3 What Potential is there for Japanese Waste-to-Energy Growth? 5.2.4 Can the Japanese Waste-to-Energy Market Keep Growing? 5.2.5 Major Japanese Waste-to-Energy Projects 5.3 The Rest of Asia-Pacific Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 5.3.1 Rest of Asia-Pacific Waste-to-Energy Facilities and Upcoming Projects 5.3.2 Analysis on the Rest of Asia-Pacific Waste-to-Energy Market 5.3.3 Analysis of the Current Australian Waste-to-Energy Market 5.3.4 The Opportunity for Foreign Investment in India 5.3.5 What About the Indonesian Market Outlook? 5.3.6 The Waste-to-Energy Potential in Malaysia 5.3.7 Waste-to-Energy Growth Potential in the Philippines 5.3.8 The Waste-to-Energy Market in Singapore 5.3.9 Will Recycling Dominate over Waste-to-Energy in South Korea?

5. www.visiongain.com Contents 5.3.10 Will the Taiwanese Market Grow? 5.3.11 Can Thailand’s Waste-to-Energy Market Grow? 5.3.12 Vietnam’s Waste-to-Energy Market 6. The North American Waste-to-Energy Market 6.1 The US Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 6.1.1 Current Status of Waste-to-Energy in the US Market 6.1.2 Drivers and Restraints in the US Waste-to-Energy Market 6.1.3 The Problems with Municipal Waste in the US 6.1.4 US Waste Legislation and Renewable Energy Potential 6.1.5 Waste Management at State Level 6.1.6 High Costs and Strong Public Opposition 6.1.7 Major US Waste-to-Energy Projects 6.2 The Canadian Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 6.2.1 Current Status of Waste-to-Energy in Canada 6.2.2 Drivers and Restraints in the Canadian Waste-to-Energy Market 6.2.3 Why is Waste-to-Energy Set to Grow in Canada? 6.2.4 What is Holding the Canadian Market Back? 6.2.5 Major Canadian Waste-to-Energy Projects 7. The Rest of the World Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 7.1 Waste-to-Energy Projects in the Rest of the World 7.2 Analysis of the Rest of the World Waste-to-Energy Market 7.3 WTE Potential in the Middle East 8. PEST Analysis of the Waste-to-Energy Market 2016-2026 8.1 Political 8.2 Economic 8.3 Social 8.4 Technological 9. Expert Opinion 9.1 Babcock & Wilcox Vølund 9.1.1 B&W Vølund’s role in the Waste-to-Energy Market 9.1.2 What is Driving and Restricting the US Waste-to-Energy Market? 9.1.3 B&W Operations and Opportunities in the Eastern European Market 9.1.4 Is the UK Waste-to-Energy Market Close to Maturity? 9.1.5 The Future of the Asian Waste-to-Energy as the Leading Investor Market

6. www.visiongain.com Contents 9.1.6 The Future of the Danish Energy from Waste Market 10. Leading Companies in the Waste-to-Energy Market 10.1 Waste-to-Energy Market Shares 10.2 China Everbright International Limited 10.2.1 China Everbright International Limited Analysis 10.2.2 China Everbright International Limited Regional Focus 10.2.3 Future Outlook 10.3 Covanta Energy Corporation 10.3.1 Covanta Energy Analysis 10.3.2 Covanta Energy Regional Focus 10.3.3 Future Outlook 10.4 Babcock & Wilcox Vølund A/S 10.4.1 Babcock & Wilcox Vølund Analysis 10.4.2 Babcock & Wilcox Vølund Regional Focus 10.4.3 Future Outlook 10.5 Viridor 10.5.1 Viridor Analysis 10.5.2 Viridor Regional Focus 10.5.3 Future Outlook 10.6 Sembcorp 10.6.1 Sembcorp Energy Analysis 10.6.2 Sembcorp Regional Focus and Future Outlook 10.7 Suez Environnement (SITA) 10.7.1 Suez Environnement Analysis 10.7.2 Suez Environnement Regional Focus 10.7.3 Future Outlook 10.8 Hunan Yonker Environmental Protection Co. Ltd 10.8.1 Hunan Yonker Environmental Protection Analysis 10.8.2 SWOT Analysis 10.8.3 Future Outlook 10.8.3.1 Rising Levels of Waste and Pollution in China 10.8.3.2 WtE as a Waste Management and Energy Solution 10.8.3.3 Inefficient WtE plant operation 10.8.3.4 A Public Opposition: The Fight against Incineration in China 10.9 Abu Dahbi National Energy Company PJSC (TAQA) 10.9.1 TAQA Analysis

7. www.visiongain.com Contents 10.9.2 TAQA Regional Focus and Future Outlook 10.10 New Energy Corporation 10.10.1 New Energy Corporation Analysis 10.10.2 New Energy Corporation Regional Focus and Future Outlook 10.11 CISC 10.11.1 CISC Analysis 10.11.2 SWOT Analysis 10.11.3 Future Outlook 10.11.3.1 Rising Levels of Waste and Pollution in China 10.11.3.2 WtE as a Waste Management and Energy Solution 10.11.3.3 Inefficient WtE plant operation 10.11.3.4 A Public Opposition: The Fight Against Incineration in China 10.11.3.5 Potential Expansion into India 10.12 Other Waste-to-Energy Companies 10. 12.1 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Environmental & Chemical Engineering Co. Ltd. (MHIEC) 10.12.1.1 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Environmental & Chemical Analysis 10.12.1.2 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Environmental & Chemical Regional Focus 10.12.1.3 MHIEC Future Outlook 10.12.2 Keppel Seghers 10.12.2.1 Keppel Seghers Analysis 10.12.2.2 Keppel Seghers Regional Focus 10.12.2.3 Future Outlook 10.12.3 Hitachi Zosen Inova AG 10.12.3.1 Hitachi Zosen Inova Analysis 10.12.3.2 Hitachi Zosen Inova Regional Focus 10.12.3.3 Future Outlook 11. Conclusions 11.1 The Global Waste-to-Energy Market Outlook 11.2 Key Regional Findings 11.3 Key National Findings 11.4 Recommendations

8. www.visiongain.com Page 77 Waste to Energy (WtE) Market Outlook 2016-2026 Capacity (tpa) & CAPEX ($m) Forecasts for Incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) & Refuse- Derived Fuel (RDF) in Electricity Generation, District Heating & Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Energy from Waste (EfW) Plants; Featuring Technologies: Mass Burn, Gasification, Pyrolysis, Fluidised Bed, Advanced Thermal Treatment (ATT), & Advanced Conversion Technology (ACT) 4.3 The Polish Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 Table 4.8 and Figure 4.10 display the development of the emerging Polish WtE market over the next ten years. Poland currently has the strongest EU EfW market in Europe after the UK. Until recently, Poland had very little significance in the global WtE market but as central European countries approach saturation, the spotlight has been shifted to Poland and other Eastern European countries due to their immature 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2016-2026 CapacityMtpa 0.79 1.32 1.51 2.00 2.90 3.80 4.30 4.90 5.40 6.10 6.60 6.90 45.73 AGR(%) 68.6% 13.8% 34.6% 42.6% 29.5% 14.7% 12.8% 11.3% 13.0% 7.4% 5.3% CAPEX($m) 594 407 506 520 495 520 250 310 330 375 320 260 4293 AGR(%) -31.5% 24.3% 2.8% -4.8% 5.1% -51.9% 24.0% 6.5% 13.6% -14.7% -18.8% CAGR(%)2016-2021 CAGR(%)2016-2026 -9.3% 2021-2026 0.8% -4.4% -60% -50% -40% -30% -20% -10% 0% 10% 20% 30% 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 AGR(%) CAPEX($m) CAPEX ($m) AGR (%) Source: Visiongain 2016 Table 4.8 Polish Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 (Mtpa, $m, AGR %, CAGR %, Cumulative) Figure 4.10 Polish Waste-to-Energy Market Forecast 2016-2026 ($m, AGR %) Source: Visiongain 2016

9. www.visiongain.com Page 88 Waste to Energy (WtE) Market Outlook 2016-2026 Capacity (tpa) & CAPEX ($m) Forecasts for Incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) & Refuse- Derived Fuel (RDF) in Electricity Generation, District Heating & Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Energy from Waste (EfW) Plants; Featuring Technologies: Mass Burn, Gasification, Pyrolysis, Fluidised Bed, Advanced Thermal Treatment (ATT), & Advanced Conversion Technology (ACT) In 2012, 58% of Ireland’s MSW was recovered abroad showing huge potential for more treatment facilities in the country. There are two primary drivers of the WtE market in Ireland: governmental support and landfill taxation. The landfill tax in Ireland is €50 ($56) per tonne which, when combined with an average gate fee of €30-35 ($35-40) per tonne and VAT of 13.5%, means an overall landfill fee of €109-115 ($123-130) per tonne. This is one of the highest net rates in Europe and makes EfW treatment economical for local authorities. 4.4.3 Major Irish Waste-to-Energy Projects Table 4.14 shows the current capacity of WtE facilities in Ireland to be 220,000 tonnes per year from the solo EfW plant in Carranstown in Meath. The table also shows the Poolbeg Dublin facility that is being constructed and is planned to be operational in 2017. The €500m ($570m) CHP plant will process 600,000 tonnes of municipal waste per year. It will export 68.8MWe of electricity and heat to the local area including heat to 50,000 homes. Company Project Capacity (tpa) MW Capacity Investment ($m) Completion Year Status Indaver Carranstown 220,000 2012 Operational Covanta and Dong Poolbeg 600,000 68.8 $570 2017 Under Construction Cadence EnviroPower Limerick 350,000 36 $160 2018 Planning Indaver Ringaskiddy - - - - Refused Permission Dublin EfW 300,000 30 $285 Planning Phase Indaver's second project has been in the planning stages for a number of years and it is unlikely that the project will go into construction in the next few years. A second waste-to-energy plant is in the planning phase, but it is not expected to be operating until the end of the first forecasting period. Limited information has been given out, but the plant will be based near Dublin and process around 300,000 Mtpa. Table 4.14 Major Irish WtE Projects (Company, Project Title, TPA Capacity, MW Capacity, $m Investment, Completion Year, Status) Source: Visiongain 2016

10. www.visiongain.com Page 203 Waste to Energy (WtE) Market Outlook 2016-2026 Capacity (tpa) & CAPEX ($m) Forecasts for Incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) & Refuse- Derived Fuel (RDF) in Electricity Generation, District Heating & Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Energy from Waste (EfW) Plants; Featuring Technologies: Mass Burn, Gasification, Pyrolysis, Fluidised Bed, Advanced Thermal Treatment (ATT), & Advanced Conversion Technology (ACT) 9. Expert Opinion 9.1 Babcock & Wilcox Vølund Babcock & Wilcox Vølund is a Danish clean-tech company that is an expert in extracting the greatest amount of energy and heat possible from residues from waste and biomass. We both develop, manufacture, construct, maintain and operate energy-from-waste plants and thus have many highly educated and specialised employees. Globally, we have delivered more than 500 environmentally friendly energy-from-waste plants in over 30 countries. We have approximately 500 employees, and offices in Denmark (Esbjerg and Glostrup) and in Sweden, in the UK, Poland and Slovakia. Our company is 100% owned by Babcock & Wilcox, USA. Our companies currently employ over 6,000 people worldwide. Visiongain spoke with Mrs. Kimberly Clark, B&W Vice President of business development for strategic markets and Mr. Ole Madsen, marketing manager for B&W’s Denmark subsidiary, B&W Volund, and would like to thank both of them for their contributions to the report. 9.1.1 B&W Vølund’s role in the Waste-to-Energy Market Visiongain: Could you tell me about Babcock & Wilcox and your role within the waste-to-energy market? Kimberly Clark: B&W provides two boiler options when using refuse as a combustion fuel. The first, known as mass burning of municipal solid waste (MSW), uses the refuse in its as-received, unprepared state. The second technique uses prepared refuse, or refuse-derived fuel (RDF), where the as-received refuse is first separated, classified, and reclaimed in various ways to yield salable or otherwise recyclable products. The remaining material is prepared for firing in the boiler furnace. B&W and its Denmark-based subsidiary, B&W Vølund, have supplied more than 500 waste-to-energy, biomass and multi-fuel units worldwide. B&W also designs and builds advanced emissions control equipment for waste-to-energy plants, including selective catalytic reduction systems for the control of nitrogen oxides, fabric filters for particulate control and a variety of other equipment for limiting emissions of sulfur oxides, metals and hazardous pollutants. In 2015, the fossil power, renewable power and environmental portions of B&W’s business spun off from the government contracting and nuclear energy part of the business. This has allowed us to strategically focus on the power and industrial segments of our business, including waste to energy.

11. www.visiongain.com Page 215 Waste to Energy (WtE) Market Outlook 2016-2026 Capacity (tpa) & CAPEX ($m) Forecasts for Incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) & Refuse- Derived Fuel (RDF) in Electricity Generation, District Heating & Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Energy from Waste (EfW) Plants; Featuring Technologies: Mass Burn, Gasification, Pyrolysis, Fluidised Bed, Advanced Thermal Treatment (ATT), & Advanced Conversion Technology (ACT) 10.3 Covanta Energy Corporation Table 10.5 provides an overview of Covanta Energy Corporation and Table 10.6 is a list of WtE projects they are involved in. Total Company Revenue (2015) $1,645m Market Share by 2016 CAPEX 2.4% Operational WtE Capacity 19,354,125 tpa Headquarters Morristown, NJ, USA Employees 1,000+ Ticker NYSE: CVA Website http://www.covantaenergy.com Project Country Capacity (tpa) Completion Year Honolulu, HI (expansion) US 328,500 2012 Taixing (85%) China 127,750 2012 Chengdu (49%) China 657,000 2013 Niagara Falls Upgrade US 1,095,000 2014 Durham/York, ON Canada 140,525 2016 Dublin Ireland 602,250 2018 Protos UK 355,875 2019 Rookery South UK 585,825 Paused / Awaiting Funding Gold River, Vancouver, BC Canada 748,250 Potential 10.3.1 Covanta Energy Analysis Covanta is the largest waste-to-energy company in the US, operating 39 facilities. The company claims to process 65% of the US’ waste-to-energy volume, converting over 19 million metric tonnes a year. Internationally, Covanta is also present in Canada and Italy, where it currently runs a single facility in each, and has more recently moved into the Chinese market, taking large stakes in two projects there. The company has also been interested the European market. Covanta has carved a dominant position for itself in the US WtE market and built a strong reputation for the company. The company will undoubtedly look for more viable WtE opportunities in the US, but has shifted its interest towards the international WtE market looking for new investments. Since Source: Visiongain 2016 Table 10.6 Covanta Energy Corporation Waste-to-Energy Projects (Project Name, Country, TPA Capacity, Completion Year) Table 10.5 Covanta Energy Corporation Overview (Total Revenue 2015 $m, Market Share by CAPEX %, Operational WtE Capacity TPA, HQ, Employees, Ticker, Website) Source: Visiongain 2016

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