VUS03 SlaveryandtheGreatAw akeningbw

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Information about VUS03 SlaveryandtheGreatAw akeningbw
Education

Published on January 10, 2008

Author: Miranda

Source: authorstream.com

VUS 03 - Colonization:  VUS 03 - Colonization Development of Indentured Servitude and Slavery:  Development of Indentured Servitude and Slavery Growth of plantation-based economy required cheap labor on a large scale. Hot, humid coastal lowlands in the Southern colonies Europeans not used to that environment. INDENTURED SERVANTS Some labor needs, especially in VA, met by indentured servants initially, but became too costly. Often poor persons from England, Scotland, or Ireland agreed to work on plantations for a period of time as an Indentured Servant. Worked in exchange for passage from Europe or relief from debts Most plantation labor needs eventually filled by forcible importation of Africans. Some African-Americans worked as indentured servants. Indentured Servants could earn their freedom and lived as free citizens during colonial period. The Triangular (or Columbian) Trade:  The Triangular (or Columbian) Trade Used by the Europeans to exchange rum or sugar for slaves Rum from the Caribbean paid for slaves from Africa Slaves from the Caribbean were also bought by gold and sugar from the Americas Other items and goods were exchanged in this trade The Middle Passage was known as the trip across the Atlantic Ocean – many Africans did not survive Why African Slaves?:  Why African Slaves? Earlier, indentured servants (European) were used “Excess population” of England no longer as high Workers needed for difficult conditions - - working on indigo, sugar, tobacco plantations Virginia: Bacon’s Rebellion of 1676 Race slavery was “the answer” for the British colonies Life for Everyone Changes:  Life for Everyone Changes With the emergence of cities – communities are formed The Great Awakening:  The Great Awakening “Great Awakening” – religious movement that swept Europe and the colonies in mid 1700s Led to rapid growth of evangelical religions (Methodists and Baptists) Challenged the established religious and governmental order – George Whitefield was responsible Laid one of the major social foundations for the American Revolution – freedom of religion VUS - 03 COLONIZATION: describe how the values and institutions of European economic life took root in the colonies and how slavery reshaped European and African life in the Americas:  VUS - 03 COLONIZATION: describe how the values and institutions of European economic life took root in the colonies and how slavery reshaped European and African life in the Americas Economic institutions in the colonies developed in ways that were either typically European or were distinctively American as climate, soil conditions, and other natural resources shaped regional economic development. Plantation economies and labor shortages resulted in the African slave trade and the development of a slave labor system in many of the colonies. The New England and Middle colonies developed their economies primarily around commerce while Virginia and other Southern colonies built their economies around agriculture. VUS - 03 COLONIZATION: describe how the values and institutions of European economic life took root in the colonies and how slavery reshaped European and African life in the Americas:  VUS - 03 COLONIZATION: describe how the values and institutions of European economic life took root in the colonies and how slavery reshaped European and African life in the Americas English values and institutions regulated colonial economic life but allowed each region to develop on its own. Early American colonists practiced self-government in a variety of ways. Religious beliefs and economic necessities influenced the social customs and arts of the colonies. The Great Awakening had social and political, as well as religious effects.

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