VMworld 2015: Explaining Advanced Virtual Volumes Configurations

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Information about VMworld 2015: Explaining Advanced Virtual Volumes Configurations

Published on July 8, 2016

Author: VMworld

Source: slideshare.net

1. Explaining Advanced Virtual Volumes Configurations Ken Werneburg, VMware, Inc Andy Banta, SolidFire STO5074 #STO5074

2. • This presentation may contain product features that are currently under development. • This overview of new technology represents no commitment from VMware to deliver these features in any generally available product. • Features are subject to change, and must not be included in contracts, purchase orders, or sales agreements of any kind. • Technical feasibility and market demand will affect final delivery. • Pricing and packaging for any new technologies or features discussed or presented have not been determined. Disclaimer CONFIDENTIAL 2

3. vSphere Virtual Volumes 3 Management & Integration Framework for External Storage vSphere Virtual Volumes The Basics • Virtualizes SAN and NAS devices • Virtual disks are natively represented on arrays • Enables VM granular storage operations using array-based data services • Storage Policy-Based Management enables automated consumption at scale • Supports existing storage I/O protocols (FC, iSCSI, NFS) • Industry-wide initiative supported by major storage vendors • Included with vSphere CONFIDENTIAL

4. CONFIDENTIAL 4 vSphere Virtual Volumes SAN / NAS Vendor Provider (VASA) Control Path Control Path Storage Policies Access Capacity Published Capabilities Snapshot Replication Deduplication QoS Virtual Datastore Storage Admin vSphere Admin VVOLs Data PathProtocol Endpoint PE vSphere Virtual Volumes Architecture

5. VVols are Just Storage “Stuff” CONFIDENTIAL 5

6. • Virtual Volumes – Virtual machine objects stored natively on the array – No file system on-disk formatting required • There are five different types of recognized Virtual Volumes: – CONFIG – vmx, logs, NVRAM, log files, etc – DATA – VMDKs – MEM – Snapshots – SWAP – Swap files – Other – Vendor solution specific CONFIDENTIAL 6 vSphere Web Client View vvol vSphere Virtual Volumes

7. Storage Containers are Where “Stuff” Lives CONFIDENTIAL 7 VM VM VM VM

8. Protocol Endpoints are How You Get the “Stuff” CONFIDENTIAL 8 iSCSI Target

9. Bindings are How the “Stuff” Finds Its Way to You CONFIDENTIAL 9 Truck A Truck B Truck C

10. VASA Provider 10

11. Overview • VVols motivations – Separation of VMware and storage management – Better use of storage capacity and network bandwidth – The upshot: better scalability and control • Configuration examples – Memory overprovisioning – Multi-tenant use of VVols – Disaster Recovery configurations CONFIDENTIAL 11

12. Motivations • Ease of management • Built on top of existing protocols • Datastore scalability – Less wasted storage space – No file system contention – Logical Storage Container concept as a replacement • Scalability through less SAN bandwidth – No vSphere data mover for normal operations – Less Storage vMotion – Less need for SDRS and SIOC CONFIDENTIAL 12

13. Different Management Perspectives • What do the Admins see? • How are the storage containers set up? • What does the vSphere Admins see? • Why are datastores still required? CONFIDENTIAL 13 vSphere Web Client Storage Management UI Datastore Storage Container

14. Ease of Management • What do the Admins see? • How are the storage containers set up? • What does the vSphere Admins see? • Why are datastores still required? CONFIDENTIAL 14 Storage policies vSphere Web Client Storage Management UI Datastore Storage Container Storage Capabilities virtual volumes virtual machines

15. Virtual Volumes CONFIDENTIAL 15 VM objects view from a storage container on an arrayVM objects view from a datastore vSphere Web Client Storage Management UI vSphere Admin View Storage Admin View VVol Storage UI

16. Multi-Protocol Support Protocol Endpoints • Access points that enable communication between ESXi hosts and storage array systems – Part of the physical storage fabric – Created by Storage administrators Scope of Protocol Endpoints • Compatible with all SAN and NAS Protocols: - iSCSI - NFS v3 - FC - FCoE • A Protocol Endpoint can support any one of the protocols at a given time • Existing multi-path policies and NFS topology requirements can be applied to the PE Why Protocol Endpoints? CONFIDENTIAL 16 SAN / NAS Virtual Datastore Data Path Protocol Endpoint PE vSphere Virtual Volumes Storage Container

17. Scalability by Separating Datastores and Protocol Endpoints • Today, there are different types of logical management constructs to store VMDKs/objects: – NFS mount points – IP or block based datastores • Datastores serve two purposes today: – Endpoints – receive SCSI or NFS reads, write commands – Storage Container – for large number of VMs metadata and data files • Differences between Protocol Endpoints and Datastores: – PEs no longer stores VMDKs but it only becomes the access point – Now you wont need as many datastores or mount point as before • Certain offloading operations will be done via VASA and other will be done using the standard protocol commands CONFIDENTIAL 17 vSphere storage fabric PE protocol endpoint SCSI: proxy LUN NFS: mount-point datastore = protocol endpoint + storage container storage system 1 VVol (storage container) Per VMDK One entity on the fabric

18. SAN Bandwidth Used Without VVols CONFIDENTIAL 18 VASA API Compatible Array 2 vSphere VMFS VVOLs 1 vSphere Admins Migrate VM from VMFS to VVOL datastore software data mover implementation

19. Operations Offloaded with VVols, Using Less SAN Resources CONFIDENTIAL 19 vSphere VMFS VVOLs vSphere Admins offload to arrayoffloadtoarray Virtual Machine Operation Offloaded • Virtual Machine provisioning • Virtual Machine deletes • Virtual Machine full clones • Virtual Machine Linked Clones • Virtual Machine Snapshots • Storage vMotion

20. Advantages All Day Long with VVols CONFIDENTIAL 20 Device-centric Silos ✖ Static classes of service ✖ Rigid provisioning ✖ Lack of granular control ✖ Frequent data migrations ✖ Time consuming processes ✖ Lack of automation ✖ Slow reaction to request Complex Processes ✖ Not commodity ✖ Low utilization ✖ Overprovisioning Specialized Costly HW

21. Real Life Examples CONFIDENTIAL 21 Memory overprovisioning Multi-tenant configuration Disaster Recovery Snapshot management

22. Using Storage Capabilities and VM Storage Policies • Storage Capabilities – are array based features and data services specifications that capture storage requirements that can be satisfied by a storage arrays advertised as capabilities • Storage capabilities define what an array can offer to storage containers as opposed to what the VM requires • Arrays Storage Capabilities are advertises to vSphere through the Vendor Provider and VASA APIs • In vSphere Storage Capabilities are consumed via VM Storage Policy constructs • VM Storage Policies is a component of the vSphere Storage Policy-based management framework (SPBM) CONFIDENTIAL 22 SPBM object manager virtual disk Datastore Profile VM Storage Policy vSphere VM Storage Policy Management Framework Storage Capabilities for Storage Array Access Capacity Published Capabilities Snapshot Replication Deduplication QoS Virtual Datastore

23. Special Handling of Swap VVols • If you’re running a memory over-provisioned system, prioritize swap VVols • Swap volumes need the lowest latency and highest throughput priorities – If your VM can’t use its memory, it can’t do much of anything useful • If the swap volumes are being used heavily, it might be time to reconfigure vSphere CONFIDENTIAL 23

24. Multi-tenant use of VVols • Use Storage Containers as logical separation • Use individual policies and capabilities as VMs require – Different policies for different VMs – Different policies for different requirements in the VM • Desktop • Database • Log CONFIDENTIAL 24 Storage Containers Access Capacity Published Capabilities Snapshot Replication Deduplication QoS

25. Disaster Recovery • Replication policies • Failover techniques CONFIDENTIAL 25 Published Capabilities Snapshot Replication Deduplication Encryption vSphere Storage Policy-Based Mgmt. Virtual Volumes Storage Policy Capacity Availability Performance Data Protection Security PE VASA Provider PE

26. Snapshots • Snapshots are a point-in-time, copy-on-write image of a Virtual Volume with a different ID from the original • Virtual Volumes snapshots are useful when creating: – A quiesced copy for backup or archival purposes, creating a test and rollback environment for applications, instantly provisioning application images, and so on • Two type of snapshots supported: – Managed Snapshot – Managed by ESX • A maximum of 32 snapshot are supported for fast clones – Unmanaged Snapshot – Managed by the storage array • Maximum snapshot dictated by the storage array CONFIDENTIAL 26 Managed Snapshot - vSphere Unmanaged Snapshot - Array

27. vSphere Virtual Volumes Supported Features CONFIDENTIAL 27 Supported vSphere Features • SPBM • Thin Provisioning • Linked Clones • Native Snapshots • Protocols: NFS3, iSCSI, FC, FCoE • View Storage Accelerator (CBRC) • vMotion • SvMotion • DRS • XvMotion • vSphere SDK (VC APIs) • VDPA/VDP • View • vRealize Operations • vRealize Automation • Stateless / Host Profiles Published Capabilities Snapshot Replication Deduplication Encryption vSphere Storage Policy-Based Mgmt. Virtual Volumes Storage Policy Capacity Availability Performance Data Protection Security PE VASA Provider PE

28. The Benefits of vSphere Virtual Volumes CONFIDENTIAL 28 A More Efficient Operational Model For External Storage Improves Resource Utilization • Increase capacity utilization • Eliminate overprovisioning • Reduce management overhead • Eliminate inefficient handoffs between VI and Storage Admin • Faster storage provisioning through automation • Simplified change management through flexible consumption • Self-service provisioning via cloud automation tools Simplifies Storage Operations • Leverage native array-based capabilities • Fine control at the VM level • Dynamic configuration on the fly • Ensure compliance through policy enforcement using automation Simplifies Delivery of Service Levels

29. Wrap upVvols was motivated by manageability, transparency and scalability. If you don’t care about those reasons, they can help you manage configurations that are otherwise difficult to manage 29

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32. Explaining Advanced Virtual Volumes Configurations Ken Werneburg, VMware, Inc Andy Banta, SolidFire STO5074 #STO5074

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