Virtual Hoof Care Seminar 2008

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Information about Virtual Hoof Care Seminar 2008
Education

Published on December 17, 2008

Author: hhdressage

Source: authorstream.com

Slide 1: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Welcome to Virtual Holistic Hoof Care Sound Hooves for All Horses Introduction : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Introduction Welcome to excerpts from our lectures. We are going to look at a few very important points the horse lover should know about horse’s hooves and how management influences the soundness of our equine partners. Slide 3: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME We’ll explore some of the horse's needs, anatomy relevant to the hoof, the functions of the hoof, shoeing and how the entire organism of the horse reacts to man-made situations. Some of the things you learn here may make you uncomfortable, but we feel that the physical and emotional well being of the horse need to be met more adequately. Worldwide the average lifespan of a horse is only 8 years! That is shocking. In nature horses get 30, even 40 and more years old. What is it that shortens the lifespan of our domesticated horses so much? Slide 4: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Let us look at the hooves first, as they are the foundation of the horse. If you ever had a horse with “bad” feet, you will be interested to know that in the end there is no such thing. The horse is designed with excellent feet from birth (yes, this is true for all breeds!). These are the hooves of our poster child from the first slide: “Echo”, a Belgian Warmblood Various Hoof Problems : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Various Hoof Problems Heel Pain Horses with high heels have among many other ailments problems with heel pain. This heel pain forces them to overload the frontal connection of the hoof capsule, leading eventually to laminitis and founder. Slide 6: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Laminitis and Founder A ground parallel coffin bone is an insurance against these dreaded ailments. Prevention would be best, but if your horse is already plagued with incorrect hoof form, a skilled hoof care professional can help to rehabilitate your equine friend. Slide 7: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Navicular Heel pain often is diagnosed as navicular syndrome or disease. Contracted heels with bars shoved high into the hoof can be very painful. The horse does not load the heel any longer, becomes short-strided and stumbles a lot. Conventional care does usually only give relief for a short time. Correct trimming may be a long term solution. Faulty Conformation : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Faulty Conformation We all have learned about horses who are toed in, toed out, base narrow, over at the knee, sickle hocked, bow legged. Before and after correct trimming, trim and picture courtesy of Lisa Huhn, www.equinextion.com Slide 9: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME When you look closer you often will see a hoof that is out of balance, on one side higher than the other, with toes too long, too short or heels too high, sometimes just on one side. Slide 10: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Think of the hoof as the foundation of the body. It becomes clear that the body has to adapt to the foundation problems. The horse’s body does so with subtle changes at first, later on leading to “conformation faults” with joint adaptation, arthritis and lameness. Above pictures: Horse with significantly wrong hoof form has trouble standing with bucked knees before first trim on the left. He is relaxed and standing still immediately after first trim on the right Slide 11: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Metabolism A non-functioning hoof without hoof mechanism will have wide reaching metabolic consequences. Waste protein does not get excreted at a normal rate and gets backed up in the liver and kidneys. The biochemical processes in the entire body are first slightly off, then becoming a bigger problem with time. Cushing’s Syndrome is one of these signs. Does This Sound Like Your Horse? : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Does This Sound Like Your Horse? At Equine Soundness Inc. we teach a paradigm that is designed to get your horse well and keep him that way. Let’s face it: We all care about the well being of our equine friends. When conventional management fails to produce results, holistic horse husbandry may well be the answer. Equine Soundness gives you a thorough education in holistic management for equines.Sign on to http://www.equinesoundness.com to learn moreor call 803-647-1200 East Coast Time Expert Advice : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Expert Advice Call or e-mail any of our instructors with your questions about hoof care. We’ll be glad to help you whenever we can.Mr. Jerry Schmidt, Port Angeles, WAe-mail: holstein01@msn.com Tel.: (360) 460-5733Mrs. Audrey Bryant, Sequim, WAe-mail: soundhorsesolutions@olypen.com Tel.: (253) 350-5336 Mrs. Claudia Garner, Hopkins, SCe-mail: hhdressage@sc.rr.com Tel.: 803-647-1200 Mrs. Carola Adolf, Bass, Victoria, Australiae-mail: hoof.care@bigpond.com Tel.: ++3 56 782 009 Mrs. Rachael Coggins, Alvin, TX e-mail: zigrachael@msn.com Tel.: 713-628-7920 These instructors are also available for seminars in your area! Shoeing : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Shoeing Since horse shoes were designed by medieval blacksmiths with available materials and not by modern biomechanical engineers with the horse’s hoof physiology in mind, there are a number of biomechanically pathological effects of horseshoes. Interestingly, little has changed about the horseshoe since its original medieval design. Slide 15: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME “Of the 122 million equines found around the world, no more than 10 percent are clinically sound. Some ten percent (12.2 million) are clinically, completely and unusable lame. The remaining 80 percent (97.6 million) are some what lame...and could not pass a soundness evaluation test." Ref: American Farriers Journal, Nov. 2000, v.26 #6, p.5. Slide 16: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME When the shoe is applied, it does not allow the hoof to flex. This causes decreased blood flow into and out of the hoof, depriving nerves of blood supply thereby resulting in the hoof becoming numb. The shoe is usually made of steel, it is very inflexible, and is solidly fixated to the hoof. The vessels that supply the hoof with blood are also compressed decreasing the efficient blood flow into and out of the hoof. The limited blood flow causes waste products to build up in the hoof, minimizing nutrients and oxygen from entering, which in turn, causes decreased cellular metabolism and tissue growth. Slide 17: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME In addition, as described above, the horse’s hooves cannot contribute to general circulation when they are restricted by horseshoes and confinement. Slide 18: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME This “circulation restricting effect” of horseshoes was dramatically demonstrated in a video produced in 1993 by Dr. Chris Pollitt Phd DVSc MSC of the Department of Companion Animal Medicine and Science, University of Queensland Brisbane Australia . Dr. Pollitt, using freshly prepared cadaver horse hooves, compared shod and non-shod specimens measuring blood flow. The application of shoes resulted in a visible dramatic reduction in blood flow and alteration in the physiology of the horse's hoof. Despite the obvious implications of this work, it has not affected the veterinary or farrier practices within the horse community significantly. Does Your Hoof Care Provider Know This? : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Does Your Hoof Care Provider Know This? At Equine Soundness Inc. we explore in detail the problems with shoes, shoeing, corrective shoeing and pathologies. Sign on to http://www.equinesoundness.com to learn moreor call 803-647-1200 East Coast Time Problems after Removing Shoes : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Problems after Removing Shoes It may sound simple: Just take the shoes off and let the horse go barefoot. There are a few things you need to know before you take this important step. Slide 21: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Poor Horn Quality The wall horn on a shod horse is not very strong and especially compromised in the areas where the nails were. This very inferior horn may not be able to stand up to regular wear. If there are no other problems and the owner wants to continue to ride, boots maybe needed for this transition period. The hoof capsule will have grown completely through within 8-10 months, sometimes even sooner. The new growth will be stronger and more resilient. If the corium was damaged in the hoof, it may take longer to grow a strong hoof capsule. The new hoof capsule will reach the ground first in the heel region, the toe takes longer to grow out. Slide 22: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Trimming Errors When circulation and feeling are restored to the hoof, trimming errors like excess horn, bars not trimmed back properly, heel points trimmed conventionally, become quickly apparent. Slide 23: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Existing Damage In horses who have been shod tight and incorrectly for a long time, the laminar connection between the coffin bone and the hoof capsule may be so compromised, that the attachment is non-existent. Removing the shoe and giving the hoof flexibility allows the sole to flatten upon weight bearing. The sole is no longer held in a vaulted position by the nailed on shoe. The vaulted sole may have been the only thing that kept the coffinbone in position. Once this "support" is removed, the coffinbone may rotate or sink deeper into the hoof capsule or both. While the coffinbone can re-suspend, this too is a matter of time and takes a minimum of 6 months. In a hoof as bruised as this one depicted here, it is apparent that there is a lot of damage. But this may not always be that obvious. Slide 24: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME That all sounds terrible… Making the transition from shod to barefoot may be as simple as taking the shoe off and applying a correct trim. Everything is fine. All the possibilities named in the previous slides are equally valid. It always depends on the damage already present in the hoof. But the real decision you have to make is that of the well-being of the horse. Only with circulation can the hoof heal. How Confident Are You? : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME How Confident Are You? Equine Soundness Inc. explores not only the problems after de-shoeing, but helps you to deal with these problems effectively as well.Sign on to http://www.equinesoundness.com to learn moreor call 803-647-1200 East Coast Time Hoof Anatomy : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Hoof Anatomy In order to understand the way the hoof grows and how pathology effects the hoof, we need to be very familiar with the anatomy of the hoof, better even with the anatomy of the whole horse.  In this chapter we are going to look at the external and the internalstructures of the hoof Outside of the Hoof : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Outside of the Hoof Slide 28: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Slide 29: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Inside the Hoof Slide 30: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Slide 31: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Coffin Bone The coffin bone is different from any other bone in the horse's body. The  triangular shape is very strong. This is the only bone that is covered by corium instead of periosteum. Corium produces horn. More about that later. The bottom edge of the coffin bone is very sharp, which has some important consequences when the hoof form becomes less than ideal. Slide 32: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Blood Supply in the Hoof The inside of the hoof is very vascular. The digital arteries enter the hoof from above and branch off to nourish the heel region, the coronary band and the sole. Slide 33: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME This is a venogram showing how vascular the hoof is Slide 34: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Horn Structures The outer wall is the hard outer covering that is most easily recognizable as the horse's hoof. It is "dead" tissue in that it has no blood or nerve supply and is made primarily of hardened protein tissue called keratin. The outer wall grows from the coronary band down toward the ground. Damaged wall can not heal at the site of  damage, but must grow out and be replaced by new horn. Slide 35: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME The hoof wall is made out of hard horn tubules (with or without dark pigment) as you can see in this picture. The horn tubules are produced by papillae in the coronary bulge and they grow in spiral form, which gives them elasticity and resilience. The hard horn tubules are connected with soft connective horn. Need Some In-Depth Knowledge? : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Need Some In-Depth Knowledge? Anatomy is an important prerequisite for correct trimming. The detailed teachings at the school will enable you to become a confident trimmer and a skilled player in a rapidly growing field. Sign on to http://www.equinesoundness.com to learn more Or call: 803-647-1200 East Coast Time Functions of the Hoof : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Functions of the Hoof The function of the hoof is to carry and move the body, anytime and regardless of temperature, terrain and age of the horse. Slide 38: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Protection The thick horn capsule protects the inside of the hoof from mechanical forces. It grows enough to withstand the natural abrasion of 10 and more miles a day. The more the horse moves, the more horn will be produced. Slide 39: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Traction The hoof is conical in shape, the wall meets the ground at an angle, giving the hoof a wedge-like action on soft, slippery ground. Frog, bulb and heels are all on the same level in a sound hoof. On weight bearing this provides a suction cup effect on very slick terrain, like wet pavement or ice. Would You Learn More to Help Your Horse Live a Longer and Better Life? : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Would You Learn More to Help Your Horse Live a Longer and Better Life? Equine Soundness Inc. is a school for holistic horse and hoof care. While we have an emphasis on training future hoof care professionals, anyone can enroll in our online courses. Detailed anatomy and function of the hoof are taught in an appealing format. Pathology and how to remedy many of the same through judicial trimming are also part of the curriculum. Sign on to http://www.equinesoundness.com to learn moreor call 803-647-1200 East Coast Time Our Experts : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Our Experts : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Heart Supporting Circulatory Pump By being flexible (expanding on weight bearing, narrowing during non- weight bearing) the hoof capsule acts as a circulatory pump in the area of the corium, supporting the heart  with each step by moving the blood from the far end of the extremities back up the leg to the body. : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Feeling The horse can feel the ground. Intense pressure (as from a large rock) tells the horse to pick up the foot before putting full weight on it and possibly doing damage through bruising Slide 44: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Hoof Mechanism The hoof is a very vascular structure, however it is the structure the farthest removed from the heart. In order for the blood to be pumped back to the rump of the horse, against gravity, the hoof is constructed to aid with this pumping. Slide 45: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Upon weight bearing the frontal wall of the hoof sinks minimally towards the middle of the hoof (see picture), the lateral walls move slightly down and out. When there is no pressure on the hoof, there is no pressure on the lateral walls either. During weight bearing the solar vault is flattened, the frog gets closer to the ground and the bulbs of the hoof are lowered. When weight is removed, all structures "spring" back into their original position. Slide 46: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Here is the hoof in the weight bearing phase. The coffin bone sinks down in the hoof capsule. The increased diameter of the hoof capsule upon weight bearing allows for more space around the coffin bone. The laminar corium fills with blood. The sole draws flatter, makes room for the descending coffin bone and therefore the solar corium also fills with blood. Slide 47: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME On weight bearing, the slanted bulge of the coronary corium (together with the extensor tendon and the slanted top of the interior wall) press against the coronary venous plexus and move the blood up the leg. Are You Ready? : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Are You Ready? Once you have intimate knowledge of equine physiology and psychology you will be much more in tune with the needs of your equine partner Sign on to http://www.equinesoundness.com to learn moreor call 803-647-1200 East Coast Time Slide 49: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME The shape of the hoof capsule is in general determined by the shape of the coffin bone. Slide 50: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Healthy frontal coffin bones have a toe angle of  about 45º , healthy coffin bones of the hind feet are about 55º Slide 51: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Healthy coffin bones have a more shallow solar vault in the front hooves, a steeper solar vault in the hind hooves Slide 52: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME The front hooves differ in form and function from the hind hooves. The hind quarters provide propulsion. The horse pushes off backward and outward. It is physiologically correct (both in terms of hoof wear and traction) for the outside wall of the hind hoof to be more slanted than the inside wall. The outside half of the hind hoof is also slightly wider than the inside. Slide 53: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME A near perfect foot. The scoop on the bottom of the hoof prevents the hoof wall from binding against the ground when the hoof becomes full weight bearing. Slide 54: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Red line: Toe height Green line: Toe length Blue line: Coronet angle Want to Know More? : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Want to Know More? Anyone can enroll in our online courses. Detailed anatomy and function of the hoof are taught in an appealing format. Pathology and how to remedy many of the same through judicial trimming are also part of the curriculum. Sign on to http://www.equinesoundness.com to learn more or call 803-647-1200 East Coast Time Connecting the Hoof to the body : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Connecting the Hoof to the body The old saying “No Hoof, No Horse” has much more truth to it than we ever thought. As we have learned about correct hoof form, we have not yet mentioned one implication. On top of the coronet band lie the very important end points of the body meridians. Slide 57: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME These end points, also known as ting points, keep the major body organs in balance if they are stimulated correctly. Slide 58: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Only when the force of the body comes onto the coronet band in the way nature intended, will the body stay balanced. Any imbalance in the hoof will influence these ting points negatively and over time the major organs will suffer. Slide 59: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME To take custody of a large animal like a horse is a huge responsibility. We all are steeped in traditional thinking and it often takes a leap of faith to change our surroundings. Let us look a little more into the lifestyle of the horse and how that may influence his well-being. Slide 60: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Horse Husbandry Slide 61: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Please check if these questions and statements sound familiar: Is barefoot right for my horse? All the other horses in the barn are shod.  My trainer told me that horses who are ridden need shoes for better support. I am riding on trails and my horse's hooves break out. When we took the shoes off my horse was lame/ uncomfortable. I want my horse to be comfortable. I want my horse to have the best. I want my horse to be a performance horse, isn't barefoot just for hobby and retired horses? My horse has a conformation problem and needs orthopedic shoeing. Slide 62: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME All  these statements and questions are relevant. We want what is best for our horses and we want the horse to be comfortable. Unfortunately all of our combined efforts sometimes do not meet this goal, as we often see "good care", "competent horsemanship", and "excellent farrier work" in a context that does not mesh with the horse's needs. Is Your Horse Management Up-To-Date? : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Is Your Horse Management Up-To-Date? Horse husbandry is steeped in tradition, often to the detriment of the well-being of the horse. Let us help you to make the right decisions for your horse. Sign on to http://www.equinesoundness.com to learn moreor call 803-647-1200 East Coast Time Natural Environmental Conditions : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Natural Environmental Conditions The basic needs of the horse are: Food Water Movement Companionship Sounds simple? Let's look at what that really means. : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Sounds simple? Let's look at what that really means. Slide 66: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME In order to really understand our horses we need to look at their lifestyle in the wild. In the last few decades we have learned a lot from feral horses in the American West. These horses get much older than our domesticated horses and are not plagued by colic, skin conditions, navicular syndrome, dental problems or founder. They do not have routine vet checks and nobody blankets them when the temperatures fall below freezing. Yet they are healthy. And they have been for 6 million years. This is how long the horse has been around in his present form. Is Holistic Horse Care Just a Buzz Word? : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Is Holistic Horse Care Just a Buzz Word? Nutrition, Lifestyle, psychological requirements are vital for the well-being of our equine friends. Let us share our thoughts about holistic horsemanship. Sign on to http://www.equinesoundness.com to learn moreor call 803-647-1200 East Coast Time Conventional Horse Husbandry : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Conventional Horse Husbandry Domesticated horses live in a variety of boarding conditions. Very few horse owners have the luxury of owning several hundred acres for their horses to roam around. In general the situation looks more like this: Horses are kept in box stalls They are turned out in small paddocks, usually by themselves to avoid injuries They are often not turned out at all Horses are fed from table height and watered the same way They stand in bedding They are shod They are protected from the environment and wear blankets All of the above is the "norm", exceptions are rare. Slide 69: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME There are several problems with this kind of horse management and these problems are very hidden, as our horses in general seem to be in good health. Sure there is the occasional cribber, weaver, biter. Sure there are horses who start coughing in the winter, cannot keep a shoe on and become lame. Colic is an anticipated occurrence in boarding barns, and lately gastric ulcers seem to be prevalent in performance horses. But open any magazine and there is a cure for almost everything, just think of Strongid C, which comes with an insurance policy for colic surgery. Let's investigate some of the contra-indicators associated with "conventional boarding" : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Let's investigate some of the contra-indicators associated with "conventional boarding" Horses are kept in box stalls : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Horses are kept in box stalls Slide 72: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Sometimes they can touch noses through the bars, sometimes they cannot see each other, but just hear each other. Slide 73: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Look at the picture below. This is not a barn, but a similar situation: Prison. The picture is of the maximum security prison Alcatraz. Slide 74: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Above: A horse who lives with the head down has more weight on the toe and the toe wall is thicker. A horse who lives a lot with his head up has more weight on the heel and this creates underslung heels. In order to see anything while in a stall, the horse has to keep the headup. This puts strain on his back and hooves, as he was designed to live with his head down for most of the time. Slide 75: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Below: On the left side are the forces acting on a hoof when the horse has the head down, the right picture depicts the forces acting on the hoof with the head up. Slide 76: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Furthermore the horse in a box stall cannot interact with other horses, which takes away his security. This situation sends alarm signals to the brain which in turn affects the entire body negatively. Slide 77: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME We would think of a dog kept all day long in a cage as cruel, yet a dog is a predator and much closer to the human species than a horse. A prey animal in a 12' x 12' cage with nowhere to go is a recipe for disaster - think about this happening to a deer - that doesn't sound right, does it? And what would happen if you would open the stall doors in a barn? Do you think a single horse would stay in? Slide 78: ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Check out how the activities between horses in different surroundings compare in the graph below and then judge for yourself if a horse who stands around 68% of the time can be a healthy animal. Natural Horse Husbandry : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Natural Horse Husbandry "What your horse would like for you to know about how he would like to live" Up-To-Date, Always Improving and Expanding : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Up-To-Date, Always Improving and Expanding In our courses we explore healthy alternatives to conventional horse husbandry and show you alternatives that will serve the needs of your horse.A program like that at Equine Soundness Inc. grows constantly with new developments and research in the relatively new field of barefoot hoof care and re-discovered natural horse husbandry. Sign on to http://www.equinesoundness.com to learn moreor call 803-647-1200 East Coast Time Thank You : ©Equine Soundness Inc. 2008 UNO ALLA VO LTA ONE AT A T IME Thank You Fisher Lameness Foundation http://www.healthehoof.com Perri Allemand http://www.horsesrunningwild.com Jerry Schmidt http://www.freedomfarms.net Lisa Huhn http://www.equinextion.com Todd Merrell http://www.zenequine.com Claudia Garner http://www.hoofcareunltd.com Dr. Andrew Parks from the University of Georgia, USA Dr. Chris Pollitt from the University of Queensland, AustraliaandDwayne Snyder, Equestrian Images for the use of their pictures and resources. Some of the graphics/pictures came from unknown sources. If any copyrights have been breeched by using them, please contact info@equinesoundness.com and we will acknowledge them or they will be removed immediately.

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