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Vikings student project

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Information about Vikings student project
Education

Published on November 18, 2008

Author: dmfehr

Source: authorstream.com

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Slide 1: Vikings By: Amanda, Kendra, Christina Research Outline Sheet : Research Outline Sheet Homes and Villages What were the houses made of? What did the inside of a Viking home look like? Different buildings in Village?Location? How many lived in one house? Government/Law What type of Government? What was the Viking Legal System like? How did they solve problems? Did woman have very many rights? Who and What was the Viking class of government? Slide 3: Homes and Villages Materials of a Longhouse : Materials of a Longhouse Most Vikings lived in a Longhouse, usually consisting of one large room. Most often the Vikings had a turf roof, as it was good insulation from the cold area that they inhabited. The walls of these large houses were made of oak planks, secured together with wattle and daub, small branches woven together plastered on each side of the wall with straw and mud, infill. The roofs were made of straw or reed thatch. The door of the longhouse was kept tightly shut by placing thick carpets of wool in front. What were the houses made of? Inside a Viking Home : Inside a Viking Home Longhouse Game A central fire in the longhouse was a main source of light and heat which needed a hole in the roof to let out the smoke. Along the perimeter of the longhouse would be sleeping platforms for the family if they weren’t wealthy enough to buy beds. What did the inside of a Viking home look like? Slide 6: Virtual Tour of a Longhouse The Vikings have left many traces of their settlement which are still visible today. Archaeology provides physical evidence of their conquests, settlement and daily life. The study of place-names and language shows the lasting effect which the Viking settlements had in the British Isles, and DNA analysis provides some insights into the effect the Vikings had on the genetic stock of the countries where they settled. All of this provides valuable information, but the only reason that we have an idea of the 'Vikings' as people is their appearance in the written sources. This sight was also discovered by Archaeologists, found in the 1970s at Ribblehead, Yorkshire. Discoveries: Different buildings in Village? Location? Inside the Chieftain Hall : Inside the Chieftain Hall The chieftain hall was the most important home in the Viking Village, where the chieftain lived with his lady. In this building, during the day, many people gathered together to practice the Viking Cult. The entrance of the chieftain's home led to the hall, or main room, which consisted of a clay-covered hearthstone, where a fire burned all day. Off the main hall were 8 out of the 37 beds located in different areas of the longhouse. The other 29 beds were located around the main hall. In the middle of the house was a hearth where the food was prepared. Each day this building got very busy from all the families doing arts and crafts. You can imagine the amount of people from the quantity of beds.Usually these people would be all related, from the chieftain, as they are all under his care. In the chieftain hall there would be seats that towered over the room where the chieftain and his lady governed the feast and held the court. The high seat was the symbolic centre of all social life, politics and religion. Chieftain Hall Panorama Chieftain Seat Chieftain Bedroom How many Vikings lived in a house? Summary of Homes and Villages : Summary of Homes and Villages Longhouse and Villages: Most Vikings lived in longhouses Longhouses usually had one large room Walls of longhouses were made of oak planks secured together with wattle and daub infill(straw and mud) Roof was made of straw or reed thatch Most people didn’t have beds only if they were wealthy Others had sitting platforms during the day and sleeping platforms at night These sleeping platforms were spread around the perimeter of the longhouse Each longhouse belonged to a chief Sleeping platforms would be covered with furs, skins, or clothes These were put there for warmth and comfort In the middle of the house was a fire, which was a main source of light and heat Above the fire on the roof was a hole where the smoke went out They had one door which was held tightly shut by placing thick carpets of wool in front Longhouse were built to accommodate people and their cattle Many other stores and shops were in a Viking village Like: storehouses (where grain and food supplies were stored), and workshops (where weapons and farming tools were made) Chieftain Hall: Was the most important building in a Viking village Place where the chieftain lived Also a place where everyone gathered to practice the Viking Cult Was 20 meters long There were benches along the walls for sitting on during the day In the middle of the home there is a hearth where the food was prepared this building was busy each day with people doing crafts In the house were high seats where the chieftain and his lady watched over All power and order came from the high seats, where the ruling couple governed the feast and held the court Had 37 beds inside all spread throughout the home 8 beds were separated throughout the room Did you know? That every Saturday it was bath day for the Vikings, they all headed to the bath house for their weekly bath by the farm! : Did you know? That every Saturday it was bath day for the Vikings, they all headed to the bath house for their weekly bath by the farm! Slide 10: Government/Law Government and Law : Government and Law Vikings were fearless, pitiless people unafraid of the world around them. However, at home they were very organised people that had a code of law for every situation that might arise. For example, a punishable offence was calling another person a insulting nickname. Their code of law also allowed Viking men to have more than one wife at a time.The Viking women had more rights than other women in society's at that time. They could own property, and their husbands would have to share the wealth that they made with them. What type of Government? The Viking Villages were ruled by a King or a Chief. However, most of the power was in the hands of the villagers. They had a democratic government and some chosen men would spend hours studying with a village elder who knew the law very well. After they had finished their studies, they would become the village’s government advisors. Viking Legal System : Viking Legal System The 'ting' was the Viking word for a legislative assembly and a court. A criminal was brought here to face trial. The expected facts of the case were decided by a panel (Old Norse "kvidr") of people stating what they thought was the truth. They had a jury of 12, more if needed depending on the importance of the case.The 'law-sayer' told the jury what the law said about the crime committed. The jury was the one to decide whether the person was guilty or innocent. If convicted, the criminal was either fined or said to be an out-law. To be an outlaw meant that the criminal had to live out in the wilderness and no one was allowed to help him in any way. The enemies were free to do their best to hunt him down and kill him. What was the Viking legal system like? Problems solved : Problems solved Holmgang (A duel) was a common way of solving disputes.There were detailed rules for duels. If the duel took place near the coast instead they would have inland duels at some well hidden place. Swords and shields were the favourite weapons used. As soon as a mans blood hit the ground the battle was over and the other team would win. To win a duel was considered as proof that you were right. The right man was said to be helped by the gods. How did Vikings solve Disputes? Woman’s Rights : Woman’s Rights The Viking woman had more rights than woman from other countries at that time. Woman could own their own property. Their husbands were forced to share their wealth with them. The code of law stated that men were allowed to have more than one wife at a time. But today this would not occur as often because it is not legal. Did woman have very many rights? Did you know? Ulls ring, the sacred ring of the Norse god ULL, is supposed to be very important in trials! : Did you know? Ulls ring, the sacred ring of the Norse god ULL, is supposed to be very important in trials! Slide 16: What is the Viking Class of Government? Summary Government : Summary Government They had a democratic government They had a strict code of law, which covered every situation that may arise There code of law allowed men to have more than one wife Woman were allowed to own there own property Woman had more rights than woman from other countries Woman were allowed to share wealth The Viking villages were ruled by a king or chief The Vikings had no written laws The “Ting” was the word for legislative assembly Ull’s ring (sacred) was very important during a trial The presumed facts of the case were decided by a panel of people stating what they thought was the truth The Vikings had no word for religion As a punishment for breaking the law you would be sent into the woods with no one to help you to live by yourself After doing this punishment you are referred to as an out-law The law-sayer told the jury what the law said about the crime committed The King and Chief were chosen during the “Ting” All villagers were able to attend the “Ting” The villagers were allowed to vote A punishable offence would a simple as calling some one a bad nick name Vikings were very organised people with a strict code of law They had a self regulated society They “Ting” system was established in 600 A.D The election may last several days Every free man had to respect the law Chieftains and Kings also had to respect the law Social behaviour was based upon an unwritten code of honour or code of ethics Slide 18:  The End!

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