advertisement

Vibrational Biophysics Iqqm Morgan

100 %
0 %
advertisement
Information about Vibrational Biophysics Iqqm Morgan
Health & Medicine

Published on February 17, 2009

Author: solarsonic

Source: slideshare.net

Description

Vibrational Physics /Energy Medicine as it applies to Solar Sonic protocols
advertisement

1. Vibrational Biophysics in the Living Matrix Cellular coherence through light and sound Methodical illustration to understanding the technologies Michael Solomon Morgan, Infusion Scientist Solar Sonic Quantum Frequency Infusion Technology(SSQFIT) Image Penetration And Stimulation Technology(IPAST) Cross Wind Technology (CWT)

2. Objectives Review the basic science of biophysics with regard to light, sound, waves & electromagnetic frequencies Explain & discuss harmonics, resonance, standing waves , & geometry in nature Review the history of the research on the effects of light, sound, & vibrations in nature & humans Discuss the future and potential applications

Review the basic science of biophysics with regard to light, sound, waves & electromagnetic frequencies

Explain & discuss harmonics, resonance, standing waves , & geometry in nature

Review the history of the research on the effects of light, sound, & vibrations in nature & humans

Discuss the future and potential applications

3. Overview Atoms contain 99% empty space; a nucleus surrounded by an electron cloud. Each minute component of an atom vibrates at a specific and unique frequency All matter is energy and light in its myriad forms and manifestations. Matter when reduced to its smallest component is only energy. The fundamental nature of everything is vibrational. Everything in the cosmos is composed of packets of vibrating energy and in a state of vibrational resonance, including the human body, as well as every form of life.  

Atoms contain 99% empty space; a nucleus surrounded by an electron cloud.

Each minute component of an atom vibrates at a specific and unique frequency

All matter is energy and light in its myriad forms and manifestations.

Matter when reduced to its smallest component is only energy.

The fundamental nature of everything is vibrational.

Everything in the cosmos is composed of packets of vibrating energy and in a state of vibrational resonance, including the human body, as well as every form of life.  

4. Overview Crystalline structures compose the body (i.e. bones, blood, DNA). Even on a molecular level our cells contain quartz crystal, which balances our electromagnetic energies. Crystalline structures can store and amplify energy emissions for functions like reception, reflection, refraction, magnification, transduction, amplification, focusing, transmutations, storage, capacitance, stabilization, modulations, balancing and transmittance In recent years, we have seen the development of MRI’s, PET scan, CAT scans as well as many other instruments that can detect, measure, display stimulate and diagnose energy impulses and patterns in the human body.

Crystalline structures compose the body (i.e. bones, blood, DNA).

Even on a molecular level our cells contain quartz crystal, which balances our electromagnetic energies.

Crystalline structures can store and amplify energy emissions for functions like reception, reflection, refraction, magnification, transduction, amplification, focusing, transmutations, storage, capacitance, stabilization, modulations, balancing and transmittance

In recent years, we have seen the development of MRI’s, PET scan, CAT scans as well as many other instruments that can detect, measure, display stimulate and diagnose energy impulses and patterns in the human body.

5. Overview When sound, light and music are placed in juxtaposition the healing process with energy medicine creates a common denominator for healing. The human body responds in unique and precise ways to a wide spectrum of energies including heat, light, pressure, sound, electromagnetics, gamma rays, microwaves, bio-electricity and neuro-electric consciousness or thought waves/brain waves. The universe is structured from this vibrating energy, and although we cannot sense it, we are made of these vibrations. Out of this concept has evolved the field of Vibrational Medicine. Vibrational Medicine moves away from the modern approaches that are mechanistic and empirical to that of a relationship that is more defined in energy, light and sound which is manifest in each of us.

When sound, light and music are placed in juxtaposition the healing process with energy medicine creates a common denominator for healing.

The human body responds in unique and precise ways to a wide spectrum of energies including heat, light, pressure, sound, electromagnetics, gamma rays, microwaves, bio-electricity and neuro-electric consciousness or thought waves/brain waves.

The universe is structured from this vibrating energy, and although we cannot sense it, we are made of these vibrations.

Out of this concept has evolved the field of Vibrational Medicine.

Vibrational Medicine moves away from the modern approaches that are mechanistic and empirical to that of a relationship that is more defined in energy, light and sound which is manifest in each of us.

6. Waves A wave is a disturbance that propagates through space or time, often transferring energy Waves travel and transfer energy from one point to another, often with little or no permanent displacement of the particles of the medium (i.e. little or no associated mass transport); instead there are oscillations around almost fixed positions. To summarize, the term wave implies three general notions: vibrations in time, disturbances in space, and moving disturbances in space-time associated with the transfer/transformation of energy.

A wave is a disturbance that propagates through space or time, often transferring energy

Waves travel and transfer energy from one point to another, often with little or no permanent displacement of the particles of the medium (i.e. little or no associated mass transport); instead there are oscillations around almost fixed positions.

To summarize, the term wave implies three general notions: vibrations in time, disturbances in space, and moving disturbances in space-time associated with the transfer/transformation of energy.

7. Waves Transverse waves are those with vibrations perpendicular to the direction of the propagation of the wave; examples include waves on a string and electromagnetic waves. Longitudinal waves are those with vibrations parallel to the direction of the propagation of the wave; examples include most sound waves. All waves have common behavior under a number of standard situations. All waves can experience the following: Reflection - wave direction change from hitting a reflective surface Refraction - wave direction change from entering a new medium Diffraction - wave circular spreading from entering a hole of comparable size to their wavelengths Interference - superposition of two waves that come into contact with each other (collide) Dispersion - wave splitting up by frequency Rectilinear propagation - wave movement in straight lines

Transverse waves are those with vibrations perpendicular to the direction of the propagation of the wave; examples include waves on a string and electromagnetic waves.

Longitudinal waves are those with vibrations parallel to the direction of the propagation of the wave; examples include most sound waves.

All waves have common behavior under a number of standard situations. All waves can experience the following:

Reflection - wave direction change from hitting a reflective surface

Refraction - wave direction change from entering a new medium

Diffraction - wave circular spreading from entering a hole of comparable size to their wavelengths

Interference - superposition of two waves that come into contact with each other (collide)

Dispersion - wave splitting up by frequency

Rectilinear propagation - wave movement in straight lines



8. Waves Examples of waves include: Ocean surface waves , which are perturbations that propagate through water. Radio waves , microwaves , infrared rays , visible light , ultraviolet rays , x-rays , and gamma rays make up electromagnetic radiation . In this case, propagation is possible without a medium, through vacuum. These electromagnetic waves travel at 299,792,458 m/s in a vacuum. Sound - a mechanical wave that propagates through air, liquid or solids. Seismic waves in earthquakes , of which there are three types, called S, P, and L. Gravitational waves , which are fluctuations in the gravitational field predicted by general Relativity . These waves are nonlinear , and have yet to be observed empirically.

Examples of waves include:

Ocean surface waves , which are perturbations that propagate through water.

Radio waves , microwaves , infrared rays , visible light , ultraviolet rays , x-rays , and gamma rays make up electromagnetic radiation . In this case, propagation is possible without a medium, through vacuum. These electromagnetic waves travel at 299,792,458 m/s in a vacuum.

Sound - a mechanical wave that propagates through air, liquid or solids.

Seismic waves in earthquakes , of which there are three types, called S, P, and L.

Gravitational waves , which are fluctuations in the gravitational field predicted by general Relativity . These waves are nonlinear , and have yet to be observed empirically.

9. Waves Waves can be described mathematically using a series of parameters. The amplitude of a wave (commonly notated as A , or another letter) is a measure of the maximum disturbance in the medium during one wave cycle. (the maximum distance from the highest point of the crest to the equilibrium). In the illustration to the right, this is the maximum vertical distance between the baseline and the wave. The units of the amplitude depend on the type of wave — waves on a string have an amplitude expressed as a distance (meters), sound waves as pressure (pascals) and electromagnetic waves as the amplitude of the electric field (volts/meter). The amplitude may be constant (in which case the wave is a c.w. or continuous wave ), or may vary with time and/or position. The form of the variation of amplitude is called the envelope of the wave. The wavelength (denoted as λ) is the distance between two sequential crests (or troughs). This generally has the unit of meters; it is also commonly measured in nanometers for the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum .

Waves can be described mathematically using a series of parameters. The amplitude of a wave (commonly notated as A , or another letter) is a measure of the maximum disturbance in the medium during one wave cycle. (the maximum distance from the highest point of the crest to the equilibrium). In the illustration to the right, this is the maximum vertical distance between the baseline and the wave. The units of the amplitude depend on the type of wave — waves on a string have an amplitude expressed as a distance (meters), sound waves as pressure (pascals) and electromagnetic waves as the amplitude of the electric field (volts/meter). The amplitude may be constant (in which case the wave is a c.w. or continuous wave ), or may vary with time and/or position. The form of the variation of amplitude is called the envelope of the wave.

The wavelength (denoted as λ) is the distance between two sequential crests (or troughs). This generally has the unit of meters; it is also commonly measured in nanometers for the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum .

10. Waves Waves can be represented by simple harmonic motion . The period T is the time for one complete cycle for an oscillation of a wave. The frequency f (also frequently denoted as ν) is how many periods per unit time (for example one second) and is measured in hertz . In other words, the frequency and period of a wave are reciprocals of each other. There are two velocities that are associated with waves. The first is the phase velocity , which gives the rate at which the wave propagates . The second is the group velocity , which gives the velocity at which variations in the shape of the wave's amplitude propagate through space. This is the rate at which information can be transmitted by the wave.

Waves can be represented by simple harmonic motion .

The period T is the time for one complete cycle for an oscillation of a wave. The frequency f (also frequently denoted as ν) is how many periods per unit time (for example one second) and is measured in hertz .

In other words, the frequency and period of a wave are reciprocals of each other.

There are two velocities that are associated with waves.

The first is the phase velocity , which gives the rate at which the wave propagates .

The second is the group velocity , which gives the velocity at which variations in the shape of the wave's amplitude propagate through space. This is the rate at which information can be transmitted by the wave.

11. Waves The wave equation is a differential equation that describes the evolution of a harmonic wave over time. The equation has slightly different forms depending on how the wave is transmitted, and the medium it is traveling through. The Schrödinger equation describes the wave-like behavior of particles in quantum mechanics. Solutions of this equation are waves functions which can be used to describe the probability density of a particle.

The wave equation is a differential equation that describes the evolution of a harmonic wave over time.

The equation has slightly different forms depending on how the wave is transmitted, and the medium it is traveling through.

The Schrödinger equation describes the wave-like behavior of particles in quantum mechanics.

Solutions of this equation are waves functions which can be used to describe the probability density of a particle.

12. Waves Quantum mechanics also describes particle properties that other waves, such as light and sound, have on the atomic scale and below. Sound waves consist of increases and decreases (typically very small ones) in the density of the air. Light is a wave, but it is a vibration of electric and magnetic fields, not of any physical medium. Light can travel through a vacuum.

Quantum mechanics also describes particle properties that other waves, such as light and sound, have on the atomic scale and below.

Sound waves consist of increases and decreases (typically very small ones) in the density of the air.

Light is a wave, but it is a vibration of electric and magnetic fields, not of any physical medium. Light can travel through a vacuum.

13. Frequency Frequency is the measurement of the number of times that a repeated event occurs per unit time . Frequency of waves Measuring the frequency of sound , electromagnetic waves (such as radio or light), electrical signals, or other waves, the frequency in hertz is the number of cycles of the repetitive waveform per second . If the wave is a sound , frequency is what characterizes its pitch. Frequency has an inverse relationship to the concept of wavelength. The frequency of the standard pitch A above middle C is usually defined as 440 Hz, that is, 440 cycles per second and known as concert pitch, to which an orchestra tunes. A baby can hear tones with oscillations up to approximately 20,000 Hz, but these frequencies become more difficult to hear as people age. In Europe, the frequency of the alternating current is 50 Hz (close to the tone G). In North America, the frequency of the alternating current is 60 Hz (close to the tone B flat — that is, a minor third above the European frequency). The frequency of the 'hum' in an audio recording can show where the recording was done — in Europe or in America.

Frequency is the measurement of the number of times that a repeated event occurs per unit time .

Frequency of waves

Measuring the frequency of sound , electromagnetic waves (such as radio or light), electrical signals, or other waves, the frequency in hertz is the number of cycles of the repetitive waveform per second .

If the wave is a sound , frequency is what characterizes its pitch.

Frequency has an inverse relationship to the concept of wavelength.

The frequency of the standard pitch A above middle C is usually defined as 440 Hz, that is, 440 cycles per second and known as concert pitch, to which an orchestra tunes.

A baby can hear tones with oscillations up to approximately 20,000 Hz, but these frequencies become more difficult to hear as people age.

In Europe, the frequency of the alternating current is 50 Hz (close to the tone G).

In North America, the frequency of the alternating current is 60 Hz (close to the tone B flat — that is, a minor third above the European frequency). The frequency of the 'hum' in an audio recording can show where the recording was done — in Europe or in America.

14. Spectra of objects Nearly all objects in the universe emit, reflect, absorb and/or transmit some light. The distribution of this light along the electromagnetic spectrum (called the spectrum of the object) is determined by the object's composition. Several types of spectra can be distinguished depending upon the nature of the radiation coming from an object: If the spectrum is composed primarily of thermal radiation emitted by the object itself, an emission spectrum occurs. Some bodies emit light more or less according to the blackbody spectrum. If the spectrum is composed of background light, parts of which the object transmits and parts of which it absorbs, an absorption spectrum occurs.

Nearly all objects in the universe emit, reflect, absorb and/or transmit some light.

The distribution of this light along the electromagnetic spectrum (called the spectrum of the object) is determined by the object's composition.

Several types of spectra can be distinguished depending upon the nature of the radiation coming from an object:

If the spectrum is composed primarily of thermal radiation emitted by the object itself, an emission spectrum occurs.

Some bodies emit light more or less according to the blackbody spectrum.

If the spectrum is composed of background light, parts of which the object transmits and parts of which it absorbs, an absorption spectrum occurs.

15. Sound Sound is a disturbance of mechanical energy that propagates through matter as a longitudinal wave , and therefore is a mechanical wave. Sound is characterized by the properties of sound waves, which are frequency, wavelength, period, amplitude, and speed. Scientists and engineers use a wider definition of sound that includes low and high frequency vibrations in air that cannot be heard by humans, and vibrations that travel through all forms of matter, gases, liquids and solids. The matter that supports the sound is called the medium. Sound propagates as waves of alternating pressure, causing local regions of compression and rarefaction. Particles in the medium are displaced by the wave and oscillate. The scientific study of sound is called acoustics.

Sound is a disturbance of mechanical energy that propagates through matter as a longitudinal wave , and therefore is a mechanical wave.

Sound is characterized by the properties of sound waves, which are frequency, wavelength, period, amplitude, and speed.

Scientists and engineers use a wider definition of sound that includes low and high frequency vibrations in air that cannot be heard by humans, and vibrations that travel through all forms of matter, gases, liquids and solids.

The matter that supports the sound is called the medium.

Sound propagates as waves of alternating pressure, causing local regions of compression and rarefaction. Particles in the medium are displaced by the wave and oscillate. The scientific study of sound is called acoustics.

16. Sound At the fourteenth week after conception, the ear electrically charges the brain field of the fetus through the eighth cranial nerve. The bones of the inner ear are the only bones completely mature at birth. They allow external sound to enter the baby’s brain beginning in the inter-uteral state. Sound is an acoustical wave; Whereas color is an electromagnetic wave. Acoustical frequencies operate on the principle of compression and expansion of molecules and require a medium of gas, liquid, or solid for transmission. Electromagnetic frequencies are created by an oscillating electrical charge and can travel easily through empty space. Both acoustical and electromagnetic frequencies are measurable in what are known as hertz or vibrations per second.

At the fourteenth week after conception, the ear electrically charges the brain field of the fetus through the eighth cranial nerve.

The bones of the inner ear are the only bones completely mature at birth. They allow external sound to enter the baby’s brain beginning in the inter-uteral state.

Sound is an acoustical wave; Whereas color is an electromagnetic wave.

Acoustical frequencies operate on the principle of compression and expansion of molecules and require a medium of gas, liquid, or solid for transmission.

Electromagnetic frequencies are created by an oscillating electrical charge and can travel easily through empty space.

Both acoustical and electromagnetic frequencies are measurable in what are known as hertz or vibrations per second.

17. Light Light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength that is visible to the eye (visible light) or, electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength. The elementary particle that defines light is the photon . The three basic dimensions of light (i.e., all electromagnetic radiation) are: (1) Intensity , or alternatively amplitude , which is related to the perception of brightness of the light, (2) Frequency , or alternatively wavelength , perceived by humans as the color of the light, and (3) Polarization (angle of vibration), which is only weakly perceptible by humans under ordinary circumstances. Due to the wave-particle duality of matter, light simultaneously exhibits properties of both waves and particles . Bioluminescence is the production and emission of light by a living organism as the result of a chemical reaction during which chemical energy is converted to light energy. Bioluminescence may be generated by symbiotic organisms carried within a larger organism. It is generated by an enzyme-catalyzed chemoluminescence reaction, wherein the pigment luciferin is oxidised by the enzyme luciferase. Adenosin triphosphate (ATP) is involved in most instances.

Light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength that is visible to the eye (visible light) or, electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength.

The elementary particle that defines light is the photon .

The three basic dimensions of light (i.e., all electromagnetic radiation) are:

(1) Intensity , or alternatively amplitude , which is related to the perception of brightness of the light,

(2) Frequency , or alternatively wavelength , perceived by humans as the color of the light, and

(3) Polarization (angle of vibration), which is only weakly perceptible by humans under ordinary circumstances.

Due to the wave-particle duality of matter, light simultaneously exhibits properties of both waves and particles .

Bioluminescence is the production and emission of light by a living organism as the result of a chemical reaction during which chemical energy is converted to light energy.

Bioluminescence may be generated by symbiotic organisms carried within a larger organism. It is generated by an enzyme-catalyzed chemoluminescence reaction, wherein the pigment luciferin is oxidised by the enzyme luciferase. Adenosin triphosphate (ATP) is involved in most instances.

18. 7 octaves Sound works on the principle that light equals sound and that tone equals radiance manifesting in the form of matter, i.e.,the visual spectrum has the same frequency as the auditory spectrum and that matter is a condensed radiant vibratory form. Everything we hear vibrates in our head and resounds in our ears, which forms the sound being transformed into electromagnetic impulses that are conveyed to the processing centers of the brain. The seven notes of the octave correspond to the seven colors of the rainbow, that correspond to the seven major physiological systems, (1) glandular, (2)muscular, (3) skeletal, (4) digestive, (5) circulatory, (6) respiratory, (7) nervous. There are also seven holes of the head that have correlations to the 7 colors and 7 notes of the octave. As well as forming the 5 skills of the senses: smell, sight, hearing, touch, taste and the two high gifts anciently and today called intuitive knowledge or intuition and creative imagination. Seven gifts total.

Sound works on the principle that light equals sound and that tone equals radiance manifesting in the form of matter, i.e.,the visual spectrum has the same frequency as the auditory spectrum and that matter is a condensed radiant vibratory form.

Everything we hear vibrates in our head and resounds in our ears, which forms the sound being transformed into electromagnetic impulses that are conveyed to the processing centers of the brain.

The seven notes of the octave correspond to the seven colors of the rainbow, that correspond to the seven major physiological systems, (1) glandular, (2)muscular, (3) skeletal, (4) digestive, (5) circulatory, (6) respiratory, (7) nervous.

There are also seven holes of the head that have correlations to the 7 colors and 7 notes of the octave.

As well as forming the 5 skills of the senses: smell, sight, hearing, touch, taste and the two high gifts anciently and today called intuitive knowledge or intuition and creative imagination. Seven gifts total.

19. Photons The photon is the elementary particle responsible for electromagnetic phenomena Mediates electromagnetic interactions and makes up all forms of light. Zero invariant mass travels at the constant speed c , the speed of light in empty space. in the presence of matter, a photon can be absorbed, transferring energy and momentum proportional to its frequency. Like all quanta, the photon has both wave and particle properties, exhibiting wave–particle duality.

The photon is the elementary particle responsible for electromagnetic phenomena

Mediates electromagnetic interactions and makes up all forms of light.

Zero invariant mass

travels at the constant speed c , the speed of light in empty space.

in the presence of matter, a photon can be absorbed, transferring energy and momentum proportional to its frequency.

Like all quanta, the photon has both wave and particle properties, exhibiting wave–particle duality.

20. Biophotons A biophoton is a photon of light emitted in some fashion from a biological system. Biophotons and their study should not be confused with bioluminescence , as the term "bioluminescence" is generally reserved for higher intensity luciferin/luciferase systems, while "biophoton emission" refers to the more general phenomena of very low-intensity photon emission from living systems. Biophoton emission is synonymous with ultraweak photon emission, low-level biological chemiluminescence, ultraweak bioluminescence , and other similar terms which are together more common in the scientific litterature than biophoton . The term "biophoton", however, has come to be associated in particular with photons emitted by certain processes that are not yet completely understood.

A biophoton is a photon of light emitted in some fashion from a biological system.

Biophotons and their study should not be confused with bioluminescence , as the term "bioluminescence" is generally reserved for higher intensity luciferin/luciferase systems, while "biophoton emission" refers to the more general phenomena of very low-intensity photon emission from living systems. Biophoton emission is synonymous with ultraweak photon emission, low-level biological chemiluminescence, ultraweak bioluminescence , and other similar terms which are together more common in the scientific litterature than biophoton .

The term "biophoton", however, has come to be associated in particular with photons emitted by certain processes that are not yet completely understood.

21. History In the 1920s, the Russian embryologist Alexander Gurwitsch reported "ultraweak" photon emissions from living tissues in the UV-range of the spectrum. He named them "mitogenetic rays", because he assumed that they had a stimulating effect on cell division rates of nearby tissue. However, common biochemical techniques as well as the fact that cell growth can generally be stimulated and directed by radiation, though at much higher amplitudes, evoked a general skepticism about Gurwitsch's assumption. Consequently, the mitogenetic radiation hypothesis was largely ignored. However, after the end of World War II some Western scientists such as Colli (Italy), Quickenden (Australia), Inaba (Japan) returned to the subject of "mitogenetic radiation", but referred to the phenomenon as "dark luminescence", "low level luminescence", "ultraweak bioluminescence", or "ultraweak chemiluminescence". Their common basic hypothesis was that the phenomenon was induced from rare oxidation processes and radical reactions. While they added some general chemistry to the hypothesis of photon emission, they did not address the more mysterious assertion of Gurwitsch that the photons themselves, forming the so-called mitogenic rays, stimulated cellular responses.

In the 1920s, the Russian embryologist Alexander Gurwitsch reported "ultraweak" photon emissions from living tissues in the UV-range of the spectrum.

He named them "mitogenetic rays", because he assumed that they had a stimulating effect on cell division rates of nearby tissue.

However, common biochemical techniques as well as the fact that cell growth can generally be stimulated and directed by radiation, though at much higher amplitudes, evoked a general skepticism about Gurwitsch's assumption. Consequently, the mitogenetic radiation hypothesis was largely ignored.

However, after the end of World War II some Western scientists such as Colli (Italy), Quickenden (Australia), Inaba (Japan) returned to the subject of "mitogenetic radiation", but referred to the phenomenon as "dark luminescence", "low level luminescence", "ultraweak bioluminescence", or "ultraweak chemiluminescence".

Their common basic hypothesis was that the phenomenon was induced from rare oxidation processes and radical reactions.

While they added some general chemistry to the hypothesis of photon emission, they did not address the more mysterious assertion of Gurwitsch that the photons themselves, forming the so-called mitogenic rays, stimulated cellular responses.

22. History In the 1970s the then assistant professor Fritz-Albert Popp , and his research group, at the University of Marburg ( Germany ) offered a slightly more detailed analysis of the topic. They showed that the spectral distribution of the emission fell over a wide range of wavelengths, from 200 to 800 nm. Popp further proposed the hypothesis that the radiation might be both semi-periodic and coherent . Popp's group constructed, tested, patented, and sought to market a device for measuring biophoton emissions as a means of assessing the ripeness and general food value of fruits and vegetables. Russian, German, and other biophotonics experts, adopting the term "biophotons" from Popp, have theorized that they may be involved in various cell functions, such as mitosis, or even that they may be produced and detected by the DNA in the cell nucleus .

In the 1970s the then assistant professor Fritz-Albert Popp , and his research group, at the University of Marburg ( Germany ) offered a slightly more detailed analysis of the topic.

They showed that the spectral distribution of the emission fell over a wide range of wavelengths, from 200 to 800 nm.

Popp further proposed the hypothesis that the radiation might be both semi-periodic and coherent .

Popp's group constructed, tested, patented, and sought to market a device for measuring biophoton emissions as a means of assessing the ripeness and general food value of fruits and vegetables.

Russian, German, and other biophotonics experts, adopting the term "biophotons" from Popp, have theorized that they may be involved in various cell functions, such as mitosis, or even that they may be produced and detected by the DNA in the cell nucleus .

23. Biophotons The theory of biophotons claim that experiments have been done which support this hypothesis--e.g., an experiment of Gurwitsch in which growth in one plant seemed to stimulate growth in another across a quartz barrier that blocked chemical messengers, indirectly suggesting that biophotons in the ultraviolet range provided the stimulus. These emissions may be part of a system of cell-to-cell communication, which may be of greater complexity than the modes of cell communication already known. These ideas would then suggest that biophotons may be important for the development of larger structures, such as organs and organisms. Studies have shown that injured cells will emit a higher biophoton rate than normal cells, and organisms with illnesses will likewise emit a brighter light, which has been interpreted as implying a sort of distress signal being given off. However, injured cells are under higher amounts of oxidative stress, which ultimately is the source of the light, and whether this constitutes a "distress signal" or simply a background chemical process is yet to be demonstrated.

The theory of biophotons claim that experiments have been done which support this hypothesis--e.g., an experiment of Gurwitsch in which growth in one plant seemed to stimulate growth in another across a quartz barrier that blocked chemical messengers, indirectly suggesting that biophotons in the ultraviolet range provided the stimulus.

These emissions may be part of a system of cell-to-cell communication, which may be of greater complexity than the modes of cell communication already known. These ideas would then suggest that biophotons may be important for the development of larger structures, such as organs and organisms.

Studies have shown that injured cells will emit a higher biophoton rate than normal cells, and organisms with illnesses will likewise emit a brighter light, which has been interpreted as implying a sort of distress signal being given off. However, injured cells are under higher amounts of oxidative stress, which ultimately is the source of the light, and whether this constitutes a "distress signal" or simply a background chemical process is yet to be demonstrated.

24. Resonance Resonance is the tendency of a system to oscillate at maximum amplitude at a certain frequency. This frequency is known as the system's resonant frequency. When damping is small, the resonant frequency is approximately equal to the natural frequency of the system, which is the frequency of free vibrations. A resonant object, whether mechanical, acoustic, or electrical, will probably have more than one resonant frequency (especially harmonics of the strongest resonance). It will be easy to vibrate at those frequencies, and more difficult to vibrate at other frequencies. It will "pick out" its resonant frequency from a complex excitation, such as an impulse or a wideband noise excitation. In effect, it is filtering out all frequencies other than its resonance. Examples are the acoustic resonances of musical instruments, the tidal resonance of the Bay of Fundy, orbital resonance as exemplified by some moons of the solar system's gas giants, the resonance of the basilar membrane in the biological transduction of auditory input , resonance in electrical circuits and the shattering of crystal glasses when exposed to a strong enough sound that causes the glass to resonate.

Resonance is the tendency of a system to oscillate at maximum amplitude at a certain frequency. This frequency is known as the system's resonant frequency. When damping is small, the resonant frequency is approximately equal to the natural frequency of the system, which is the frequency of free vibrations.

A resonant object, whether mechanical, acoustic, or electrical, will probably have more than one resonant frequency (especially harmonics of the strongest resonance). It will be easy to vibrate at those frequencies, and more difficult to vibrate at other frequencies. It will "pick out" its resonant frequency from a complex excitation, such as an impulse or a wideband noise excitation. In effect, it is filtering out all frequencies other than its resonance.

Examples are the acoustic resonances of musical instruments, the tidal resonance of the Bay of Fundy, orbital resonance as exemplified by some moons of the solar system's gas giants, the resonance of the basilar membrane in the biological transduction of auditory input , resonance in electrical circuits and the shattering of crystal glasses when exposed to a strong enough sound that causes the glass to resonate.

25. The Body is a Superconductor creating Music Physics today has confirmed that matter is organized by waveforms of sound called frequencies. If we have two violins tuned the same and pluck the string of one violin, the other violins matching string begins to vibrate and produce the same sound. Synchronized resonance happens naturally in the nature of all matter. Resonance is a basic principle that effects everyone and everything all of the time. It is the foundation of what anciently was called the law of harmonics, music of the spheres and the law of kingdoms. This same dynamic principle applies to a person in need of emotional or mental restoration, for balance or harmony, and this has lead to today’s field of medicine research called, Vibrational Medicine.

Physics today has confirmed that matter is organized by waveforms of sound called frequencies.

If we have two violins tuned the same and pluck the string of one violin, the other violins matching string begins to vibrate and produce the same sound.

Synchronized resonance happens naturally in the nature of all matter.

Resonance is a basic principle that effects everyone and everything all of the time. It is the foundation of what anciently was called the law of harmonics, music of the spheres and the law of kingdoms.

This same dynamic principle applies to a person in need of emotional or mental restoration, for balance or harmony, and this has lead to today’s field of medicine research called, Vibrational Medicine.

26. Electric energy Electrical energy covers the low-frequency, long-wavelength end of the spectrum. The radiation is usually ducted along 2-wire and 3-wire transmission lines and sent to various devices besides antennas. At zero frequency the energy is emitted by batteries and DC power supplies At 50 Hz and 60 Hz it is produced by rotary magnetic generators and ducted through the international power grids. At frequencies between 20 Hz to 30 kHz the EM energy is translated to and from acoustic energy and is distributed over telephone lines as well as being used to operate loudspeakers for public address or in music systems. Note that other than its frequency, there is no functional difference between the VHF energy guided along a television coaxial cable, versus the 60 Hz travelling along the cord leading to a light bulb. When connected to the appropriate antenna, both will radiate into space.

Electrical energy covers the low-frequency, long-wavelength end of the spectrum.

The radiation is usually ducted along 2-wire and 3-wire transmission lines and sent to various devices besides antennas.

At zero frequency the energy is emitted by batteries and DC power supplies

At 50 Hz and 60 Hz it is produced by rotary magnetic generators and ducted through the international power grids.

At frequencies between 20 Hz to 30 kHz the EM energy is translated to and from acoustic energy and is distributed over telephone lines as well as being used to operate loudspeakers for public address or in music systems.

Note that other than its frequency, there is no functional difference between the VHF energy guided along a television coaxial cable, versus the 60 Hz travelling along the cord leading to a light bulb. When connected to the appropriate antenna, both will radiate into space.

27. EMFs Legend: γ = Gamma rays HX = Hard X-rays SX = Soft X-Rays EUV = Extreme ultraviolet NUV = Near ultraviolet Visible light NIR = Near infrared MIR = Moderate infrared FIR = Far infrared Radio waves : EHF = Extremely high frequency (Microwaves) SHF = Super high frequency (Microwaves) UHF = Ultrahigh frequency VHF = Very high frequency HF = High frequency MF = Medium frequency LF = Low frequency VLF = Very low frequency VF = Voice frequency ELF = Extremely low frequency

Legend:

γ = Gamma rays HX = Hard X-rays SX = Soft X-Rays EUV = Extreme ultraviolet NUV = Near ultraviolet Visible light NIR = Near infrared MIR = Moderate infrared FIR = Far infrared Radio waves : EHF = Extremely high frequency (Microwaves) SHF = Super high frequency (Microwaves) UHF = Ultrahigh frequency VHF = Very high frequency HF = High frequency MF = Medium frequency LF = Low frequency VLF = Very low frequency VF = Voice frequency ELF = Extremely low frequency

28. EMFs Radio waves generally are utilized by antennas of appropriate size, with wavelengths ranging from hundreds of meters to about one millimeter. They are used for transmission of data, via modulation . Television, mobile phones, wireless networking and amateur radio all use radio waves. Microwaves The super high frequency ( SHF ) and extremely high frequency ( EHF ) Short enough to employ tubular metal waveguides of reasonable diameter. Produced with klystron and magnetron tubes, and with solid state diodes such as Gunn and IMPATT devices. Absorbed by molecules that have a dipole moment in liquids. In a microwave oven, this effect is used to heat food. Low-intensity microwave radiation is used in Wi-Fi . It should be noted that an average microwave oven in active condition is, in close range, powerful enough to cause interference with poorly shielded electromagnetic fields such as those found in mobile medical devices and cheap consumer electronics. Terahertz radiation Region of the light spectrum between far infrared and microwaves. Until recently, the range was rarely studied and few sources existed for microwave energy at the high end of the band (sub-millimeter waves or so-called terahertz waves ), but applications are now appearing. The proposed WiMAX standard for wireless networking, a long-range enhancement of Wi-Fi , lies within this region.

Radio waves generally are utilized by antennas of appropriate size, with wavelengths ranging from hundreds of meters to about one millimeter.

They are used for transmission of data, via modulation .

Television, mobile phones, wireless networking and amateur radio all use radio waves.

Microwaves

The super high frequency ( SHF ) and extremely high frequency ( EHF )

Short enough to employ tubular metal waveguides of reasonable diameter.

Produced with klystron and magnetron tubes, and with solid state diodes such as Gunn and IMPATT devices.

Absorbed by molecules that have a dipole moment in liquids.

In a microwave oven, this effect is used to heat food.

Low-intensity microwave radiation is used in Wi-Fi .

It should be noted that an average microwave oven in active condition is, in close range, powerful enough to cause interference with poorly shielded electromagnetic fields such as those found in mobile medical devices and cheap consumer electronics.

Terahertz radiation

Region of the light spectrum between far infrared and microwaves.

Until recently, the range was rarely studied and few sources existed for microwave energy at the high end of the band (sub-millimeter waves or so-called terahertz waves ), but applications are now appearing.

The proposed WiMAX standard for wireless networking, a long-range enhancement of Wi-Fi , lies within this region.

29. EMFs Infrared radiation The infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum covers the range from roughly 300 GHz (1 mm) to 400 THz (750 nm). It can be divided into three parts: Far-infrared , from 300 GHz (1 mm) to 30 THz (10 μm). Absorbed by so-called rotational modes in gas-phase molecules, by molecular motions in liquids, and by phonons in solids. The water in the Earth's atmosphere absorbs so strongly in this range that it renders the atmosphere effectively opaque. However, there are certain wavelength ranges ("windows") within the opaque range which allow partial transmission, and can be used for astronomy. The wavelength range from approximately 200 μm up to a few mm is often referred to as "sub-millimeter" in astronomy , reserving far infrared for wavelengths below 200 μm. Mid-infrared , from 30 to 120 THz (10 to 2.5 μm). Hot objects ( black-body radiators) can radiate strongly in this range. Absorbed by molecular vibrations, that is, when the different atoms in a molecule vibrate around their equilibrium positions. Fingerprint region since the mid-infrared absorption spectrum of a compound is very specific for that compound. Near-infrared , from 120 to 400 THz (2,500 to 750 nm). Physical processes that are relevant for this range are similar to those for visible light.

Infrared radiation

The infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum covers the range from roughly 300 GHz (1 mm) to 400 THz (750 nm). It can be divided into three parts:

Far-infrared , from 300 GHz (1 mm) to 30 THz (10 μm).

Absorbed by so-called rotational modes in gas-phase molecules, by molecular motions in liquids, and by phonons in solids.

The water in the Earth's atmosphere absorbs so strongly in this range that it renders the atmosphere effectively opaque. However, there are certain wavelength ranges ("windows") within the opaque range which allow partial transmission, and can be used for astronomy. The wavelength range from approximately 200 μm up to a few mm is often referred to as "sub-millimeter" in astronomy , reserving far infrared for wavelengths below 200 μm.

Mid-infrared , from 30 to 120 THz (10 to 2.5 μm).

Hot objects ( black-body radiators) can radiate strongly in this range.

Absorbed by molecular vibrations, that is, when the different atoms in a molecule vibrate around their equilibrium positions.

Fingerprint region since the mid-infrared absorption spectrum of a compound is very specific for that compound.

Near-infrared , from 120 to 400 THz (2,500 to 750 nm). Physical processes that are relevant for this range are similar to those for visible light.

30. EMFs Visible light range in which the sun and stars emit most of their radiation. human eye is sensitive to the wavelengths that the sun emits most strongly. Visible light (and near-infrared light) is typically absorbed and emitted by electrons in molecules and atoms that move from one energy level to another. The light we see with our eyes is really a very small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. A rainbow shows the optical (visible) part of the electromagnetic spectrum; infrared (if you could see it) would be located just beyond the red side of the rainbow with ultraviolet appearing just beyond the violet end. Ultraviolet light Radiation whose wavelength is shorter than the violet end of the visible spectrum. Being very energetic, UV can break chemical bonds, make molecules unusually reactive or ionize them, in general changing their mutual behavior.

Visible light

range in which the sun and stars emit most of their radiation.

human eye is sensitive to the wavelengths that the sun emits most strongly.

Visible light (and near-infrared light) is typically absorbed and emitted by electrons in molecules and atoms that move from one energy level to another.

The light we see with our eyes is really a very small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. A rainbow shows the optical (visible) part of the electromagnetic spectrum; infrared (if you could see it) would be located just beyond the red side of the rainbow with ultraviolet appearing just beyond the violet end.

Ultraviolet light

Radiation whose wavelength is shorter than the violet end of the visible spectrum.

Being very energetic, UV can break chemical bonds, make molecules unusually reactive or ionize them, in general changing their mutual behavior.

31. EMFs X-rays Hard X-rays are of shorter wavelengths than soft X-rays. X-rays are used for seeing through some things and not others, as well as for high-energy physics and astronomy. Neutron stars and accretion disks around black holes emit X-rays, which enable us to study them. Gamma rays The most energetic photons , having no lower limit to their wavelength. Useful to astronomers in the study of high-energy objects or regions and Use with physicists - penetrative ability and their production from radioisotopes. wavelength of gamma rays can be measured with high accuracy by means of Compton scattering. Note that there are no defined boundaries between the types of electromagnetic radiation. Some wavelengths have a mixture of the properties of two regions of the spectrum. For example, red light resembles infra-red radiation in that it can resonate some chemical bonds.

X-rays

Hard X-rays are of shorter wavelengths than soft X-rays. X-rays are used for seeing through some things and not others, as well as for high-energy physics and astronomy. Neutron stars and accretion disks around black holes emit X-rays, which enable us to study them.

Gamma rays

The most energetic photons , having no lower limit to their wavelength.

Useful to astronomers in the study of high-energy objects or regions and

Use with physicists - penetrative ability and their production from radioisotopes.

wavelength of gamma rays can be measured with high accuracy by means of Compton scattering.

Note that there are no defined boundaries between the types of electromagnetic radiation. Some wavelengths have a mixture of the properties of two regions of the spectrum. For example, red light resembles infra-red radiation in that it can resonate some chemical bonds.

32. Harmonics The harmonic of a wave is a component frequency of the signal that is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency The harmonics have the property that they are all periodic at the signal frequency, and due to the properties of Fourier series, the sum of the signal and its harmonics is also periodic at that frequency.

The harmonic of a wave is a component frequency of the signal that is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency

The harmonics have the property that they are all periodic at the signal frequency, and due to the properties of Fourier series, the sum of the signal and its harmonics is also periodic at that frequency.

33. Harmonics An 'overtone' is a partial (a "partial wave" or "constituent frequency") that can be either a harmonic or an inharmonic. A harmonic is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. An inharmonic overtone is a non-integer multiple of a fundamental frequency. An example of harmonic overtones: (absolute harmony)    f    440 Hz fundamental tone first harmonic 2 f    880 Hz first overtone second harmonic 3 f 1320 Hz second overtone third harmonic 4 f 1760 Hz third overtone fourth harmonic

An 'overtone' is a partial (a "partial wave" or "constituent frequency") that can be either a harmonic or an inharmonic.

A harmonic is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency.

An inharmonic overtone is a non-integer multiple of a fundamental frequency.

An example of harmonic overtones: (absolute harmony)

   f    440 Hz fundamental tone first harmonic

2 f    880 Hz first overtone second harmonic

3 f 1320 Hz second overtone third harmonic

4 f 1760 Hz third overtone fourth harmonic

34. Entrainment Entrainment is the process whereby two interacting oscillating systems, which have different periods when they function independently, assume the same period. The two oscillators may fall into synchrony, but other phase relationships are also possible. Circadian oscillations occur even in isolated organs, and it is believed that a master pacemaker in the brain entrains the periphery. Such hierarchical relationships are not the only ones possible: two or more oscillators may couple in order to assume the same period without either being dominant over the other(s). This situation is analogous to Huygens' pendulum clocks.

Entrainment is the process whereby two interacting oscillating systems, which have different periods when they function independently, assume the same period. The two oscillators may fall into synchrony, but other phase relationships are also possible.

Circadian oscillations occur even in isolated organs, and it is believed that a master pacemaker in the brain entrains the periphery.

Such hierarchical relationships are not the only ones possible: two or more oscillators may couple in order to assume the same period without either being dominant over the other(s). This situation is analogous to Huygens' pendulum clocks.

35. Schumann resonance The Schumann resonance is a set of spectrum peaks in the extremely low frequency (ELF) portion of the Earth 's electromagnetic field spectrum. Schumann resonances (SR) are global electromagnetic resonances, excited by lightning discharges in the cavity formed by the Earth surface and the ionosphere . Schumann resonance occurs because the space between the surface of the Earth and the conductive ionosphere acts as a waveguide . The limited dimensions of the Earth cause this waveguide to act as a resonant cavity for electromagnetic waves in the ELF band. The cavity is naturally excited by energy from lightning strikes. Schumann resonances are observed in the power spectra of the natural electromagnetic background noise, as separate peaks at extremely low frequencies (ELF) around 8, 14, 20, 26 and 32 Hz.

The Schumann resonance is a set of spectrum peaks in the extremely low frequency (ELF) portion of the Earth 's electromagnetic field spectrum.

Schumann resonances (SR) are global electromagnetic resonances, excited by lightning discharges in the cavity formed by the Earth surface and the ionosphere .

Schumann resonance occurs because the space between the surface of the Earth and the conductive ionosphere acts as a waveguide . The limited dimensions of the Earth cause this waveguide to act as a resonant cavity for electromagnetic waves in the ELF band.

The cavity is naturally excited by energy from lightning strikes. Schumann resonances are observed in the power spectra of the natural electromagnetic background noise, as separate peaks at extremely low frequencies (ELF) around 8, 14, 20, 26 and 32 Hz.

36. Schumann resonance The fundamental mode of the Schumann Resonance is a standing wave in the Earth-ionosphere cavity with a wavelength equal to the circumference of the Earth . This lowest-frequency (and highest-intensity) mode of the Schumann resonance occurs at a frequency of approximately 7.8 Hz. The ninth overtone lies at approximately 60 Hz and thus the cavity is also driven by the North American power grid . Detectable overtones extend upwards into the kilohertz range. Schumann resonances have gone beyond the boundaries of physics , invading medicine , raising interest in artists and musicians, and gaining interest from fringe fields such as psychobiology and yoga .

The fundamental mode of the Schumann Resonance is a standing wave in the Earth-ionosphere cavity with a wavelength equal to the circumference of the Earth .

This lowest-frequency (and highest-intensity) mode of the Schumann resonance occurs at a frequency of approximately 7.8 Hz. The ninth overtone lies at approximately 60 Hz and thus the cavity is also driven by the North American power grid . Detectable overtones extend upwards into the kilohertz range.

Schumann resonances have gone beyond the boundaries of physics , invading medicine , raising interest in artists and musicians, and gaining interest from fringe fields such as psychobiology and yoga .

37. Timeline Golden Ratio Phidias (490–430 BCE) made the Parthenon statues that seem to embody the golden ratio. Plato (427–347 BCE), in his Timaeus , describes five possible regular solids (the Platonic solids , the tetrahedron , cube , octahedron , dodecahedron and icosahedron ), some of which are related to the golden ratio. Euclid (c. 325–c. 265 BCE), in his Elements , gave the first recorded definition of the golden ratio, which he called, as translated into English, "extreme and mean ratio" (Greek: ακροσκαιμεσοσλογος). [8] Fibonacci (1170–1250) mentioned the numerical series now named after him in his Liber Abaci ; the Fibonacci sequence is closely related to the golden ratio. Luca Pacioli (1445–1517) defines the golden ratio as the "divine proportion" in his Divina Proportione . Johannes Kepler (1571–1630) describes the golden ratio as a "precious jewel": "Geometry has two great treasures: one is the Theorem of Pythagoras, and the other the division of a line into extreme and mean ratio; the first we may compare to a measure of gold, the second we may name a precious jewel." Charles Bonnet (1720–1793) points out that in the spiral phyllotaxis of plants going clockwise and counter-clockwise were frequently two successive Fibonacci series. Martin Ohm (1792–1872) is believed to be the first to formally use the words "golden ratio" to describe this ratio. Edouard Lucas (1842–1891) gives the numerical sequence now known as the Fibonacci sequence its present name. Roger Penrose (b.1931) discovered a symmetrical pattern that uses the golden ratio in the field of aperiodic tilings, which led to new discoveries about quasicrystals .

Phidias (490–430 BCE) made the Parthenon statues that seem to embody the golden ratio.

Plato (427–347 BCE), in his Timaeus , describes five possible regular solids (the Platonic solids , the tetrahedron , cube , octahedron , dodecahedron and icosahedron ), some of which are related to the golden ratio.

Euclid (c. 325–c. 265 BCE), in his Elements , gave the first recorded definition of the golden ratio, which he called, as translated into English, "extreme and mean ratio" (Greek: ακροσκαιμεσοσλογος). [8]

Fibonacci (1170–1250) mentioned the numerical series now named after him in his Liber Abaci ; the Fibonacci sequence is closely related to the golden ratio.

Luca Pacioli (1445–1517) defines the golden ratio as the "divine proportion" in his Divina Proportione .

Johannes Kepler (1571–1630) describes the golden ratio as a "precious jewel": "Geometry has two great treasures: one is the Theorem of Pythagoras, and the other the division of a line into extreme and mean ratio; the first we may compare to a measure of gold, the second we may name a precious jewel."

Charles Bonnet (1720–1793) points out that in the spiral phyllotaxis of plants going clockwise and counter-clockwise were frequently two successive Fibonacci series.

Martin Ohm (1792–1872) is believed to be the first to formally use the words "golden ratio" to describe this ratio.

Edouard Lucas (1842–1891) gives the numerical sequence now known as the Fibonacci sequence its present name.

Roger Penrose (b.1931) discovered a symmetrical pattern that uses the golden ratio in the field of aperiodic tilings, which led to new discoveries about quasicrystals .

38. Golden Ratio The golden ratio , usually denoted ('phi'), expresses the relationship that the sum of two quantities is to the larger quantity as the larger is to the smaller. The golden ratio is the following algebraic irrational number with its numerical approximation: The figure of a golden section on the right illustrates the defining geometric relationship. Expressed algebraically Other names frequently used for or closely related to the golden ratio are golden section (Latin: sectio aurea ), golden mean , golden number , and the Greek letter phi ( φ ).Other terms encountered include extreme and mean ratio , medial section , divine proportion (Italian: proporzione divina ), divine section (Latin: sectio divina ), golden proportion , golden cut , and mean of Phidias

The golden ratio , usually denoted ('phi'), expresses the relationship that the sum of two quantities is to the larger quantity as the larger is to the smaller. The golden ratio is the following algebraic irrational number with its numerical approximation:

The figure of a golden section on the right illustrates the defining geometric relationship. Expressed algebraically

Other names frequently used for or closely related to the golden ratio are golden section (Latin: sectio aurea ), golden mean , golden number , and the Greek letter phi ( φ ).Other terms encountered include extreme and mean ratio , medial section , divine proportion (Italian: proporzione divina ), divine section (Latin: sectio divina ), golden proportion , golden cut , and mean of Phidias

39. Golden ratio At least since the Renaissance, many artists and architects have proportioned their works to approximate the golden ratio—especially in the form of the golden rectangle , in which the ratio of the longer side to the shorter is the golden ratio—believing this proportion to be aesthetically pleasing. Mathematicians have studied the golden ratio because of its unique and interesting properties. A regular square pyramid is determined by its medial right triangle, whose edges are the pyramid's apothem (a), semi-base (b), and height (h); the face inclination angle is also marked. Mathematical proportions b:h:a of and and are of particular interest in relation to Egyptian pyramids. Both Egyptian pyramids and those mathematical regular square pyramids that resemble them can be analyzed with respect to the golden ratio and other ratios. Egyptian pyramids very close in proportion to these mathematical pyramids are known.

At least since the Renaissance, many artists and architects have proportioned their works to approximate the golden ratio—especially in the form of the golden rectangle , in which the ratio of the longer side to the shorter is the golden ratio—believing this proportion to be aesthetically pleasing.

Mathematicians have studied the golden ratio because of its unique and interesting properties.

A regular square pyramid is determined by its medial right triangle, whose edges are the pyramid's apothem (a), semi-base (b), and height (h); the face inclination angle is also marke

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Cranial Laser Reflex Technique: Healthcare for Geniuses

Cranial Laser Reflex Technique: Healthcare for Geniuses ... Vibrational Biophysics Iqqm Morgan; Cranial Laser Reflex Technique: Healthcare for Gen...
Read more

Biophysics | LinkedIn

View 68372 Biophysics posts, presentations, experts, and more. Get the professional knowledge you need on LinkedIn.
Read more

Sarah Morgan (University of Cambridge, Cambridge) on ...

Sarah Morgan of University of Cambridge, Cambridge with expertise in Theoretical Physics, Quantum Physics, Biophysics is on ResearchGate. Read 2 ...
Read more

Adventures in Physical Chemistry - Annual Review of ...

Adventures in Physical Chemistry. Annual Review of Biophysics. Vol. 39: 1-21 ... electron and NMR spectroscopy, membrane biophysics, and immunology.
Read more

Biophysics: Life in a jam : Nature Physics : Nature ...

Biophysics: Life in a jam. Shreyas Gokhale 1, Jeff Gore 1, Affiliations; Corresponding authors; Journal name: Nature Physics Year published: (2016) DOI:
Read more

Comprehensive Biophysics, 1st Edition | Edward Egelman ...

Elsevier Store: Comprehensive Biophysics, 1st Edition from Edward Egelman. ISBN-9780123749208, Printbook , Release Date: 2012
Read more

Molecular Biophysics, 1st Edition | M Volkenstein | ISBN ...

Elsevier Store: Molecular Biophysics, 1st Edition from M Volkenstein. ISBN-9780323144186, Ebook
Read more

Sarah Morgan - Publications - ResearchGate - Share and ...

ResearchGate is a network dedicated to science and research. Connect, collaborate and discover scientific publications, jobs and conferences. All for free.
Read more