Vasa

50 %
50 %
Information about Vasa
Entertainment

Published on November 7, 2007

Author: Sevastian

Source: authorstream.com

A Project Management Nightmare:  A Project Management Nightmare The Swedish Warship Vasa The Swedish Warship Vasa (from “Why Did the Vasa Sink” on the Museum Web Site):  The Swedish Warship Vasa (from “Why Did the Vasa Sink” on the Museum Web Site) The warship Vasa, pride of the Swedish Navy and built at the cost of 4% of the Swedish GNP that year, was launched in Stockholm harbor in August 1628. Twenty minutes after launch, a small gust of wind capsized her, and she sank to the bottom of the harbor, where she remained for 333 years. The Vasa:  The Vasa Why Did the Vasa Sink?:  Why Did the Vasa Sink? In the 17th century there were no scientific methods of calculating a ship's stability. It was not uncommon that warships heeled over and sank. Their cargo - the guns - were placed relatively high up in the ship, whereas merchant-vessels stored their cargo in the hold, ie in the bottom of the ship. Why Did the Vasa Sink?:  Why Did the Vasa Sink? Instead of using calculations, the 17th century shipbuilders used so called reckonings, which recorded certain ship-measurements. However, the reckonings used in building the Vasa were intended for smaller ships with only one gundeck. Why Did the Vasa Sink?:  Why Did the Vasa Sink? The Vasa was built differently. She had two gundecks with heavy artillery (when the norm was to place lighter guns on the upper gundeck). The standard rules obviously did not apply here. Why Did the Vasa Sink?:  Why Did the Vasa Sink? Deep down in the Vasa several tons of stone were stored as ballast. They were meant to give the ship stability. However, the main reason for the Vasa capsizing was that the ballast was not enough as counterweight to the guns, the upper hull, masts and sails of the ship. The Stability Test:  The Stability Test In the inquiries after the Vasa disaster it was revealed that a stability test had been performed prior to the maiden voyage. Thirty men had run back and forth across the Vasa's deck when she was moored at the quay. The men had to stop after three runs, well before the test could be completed - otherwise, the ship would have capsized. After the test failed:  After the test failed Present was Admiral Klas Fleming, one of the most influential men in the Navy. His only comment to the failed stability test was "If only His Majesty were at home!" After that he let the Vasa make her maiden voyage. Who was to blame?:  Who was to blame? Admiral Fleming. Partly. He could have stopped the ship after the stability test. On the other hand, the ship was already complete and the king was waiting impatiently in Polish Prussia. Who was to blame?:  Who was to blame? King Gustavus Adolphus. Partly. He was anxious to acquire a ship with as many heavy guns as possible. He had also approved the Vasa's dimensions and was keen to have her completed rapidly. Who was to blame?:  Who was to blame? The shipbuilder Henrik Hybertsson. Partly. Although he built the hull too narrow, he was a skilled shipbuilder who had previously built many good ships. His unexpected death the previous year just complicated matters. Who was to blame?:  Who was to blame? The captain Söfring Hansson. According to a new theory the capsizing of the Vasa may be blamed on the captain. He sailed a brand new ship with open gunports. The Vasa sank when water gushed in through the lower gunports! It would have been wiser to test the new ship on her maiden voyage with closed gunports. Who was to blame?:  Who was to blame? However, the inquiries showed that no one could really be blamed for the disaster. The main reason being the insufficient theoretical know-how of the period. The Vasa was something new - a military experiment. After the Vasa:  After the Vasa After the Vasa, many successful ships were built with two, three and even four gun decks. The shipbuilders learned from their mistakes with the Vasa and improved later designs. The Vasa Museum:  The Vasa Museum The Vasa Museum, P.O. Box 27131 S-102 52 Stockholm, Sweden Tel +46 8 519 548 00 What can we learn from the Vasa?:  What can we learn from the Vasa? Don’t let a customer without technical qualifications set the technical requirements. The Vasa was built according to royal decrees. Apparently, no-one was willing to disagree with the king when he suggested a change. What can we learn from the Vasa?:  What can we learn from the Vasa? Control Requirements Creep. Although designed for one deck of guns, King Gustavus Adolphus heard that Denmark was building a ship with two gun decks. He told the builder to add a second gun deck. What can we learn from the Vasa?:  What can we learn from the Vasa? If you don’t have a tested design, build a prototype. The Vasa had no plans. They designed it as they went along. They didn’t know whether it would float until they finished building it. A scale mode would probably have shown the flaw in the design at a much lower cost. What can we learn from the Vasa?:  What can we learn from the Vasa? When a test fails, fix the problem before releasing the product. Thirty men had run back and forth across the Vasa's deck when she was moored at the quay. The men had to stop after three runs, well before the test could be completed - otherwise, the ship would have capsized. What can we learn from the Vasa?:  What can we learn from the Vasa? Take responsibility. Stick your neck out. No one was willing to cancel the launch because the King was in Prussia waiting for the ship. He had not delegated enough authority to the people left behind to avoid a disaster. What can we learn from the Vasa?:  What can we learn from the Vasa? Beware unrealistic schedules. The Vasa was built in two years under extreme pressure. It is not known how many shortcuts were taken as a result. “There is never enough time to do it right, but there is always time to do it over.” What can we learn from the Vasa?:  What can we learn from the Vasa? Don’t allow Requirements Gold Plating The Vasa had extensive ornamentation and delicate carvings. Clearly a lot of the budget was spent on decoration. Software Projects:  Software Projects Following are thirty-five classic mistakes in software development. As you read the list, consider how many mistakes had a parallel in building the Vasa. Why are we still making the same mistakes that were made 350 years ago? Thirty Five Classic Mistakes in Software Development:  Thirty Five Classic Mistakes in Software Development From Chapter 3 of Rapid Development: Taming Wild Software Schedules, by Steven McConnell The Book:  The Book People-Related Mistakes:  People-Related Mistakes Undermined Motivation Weak Personnel Uncontrolled Problem Employees Heroics Adding People to a Late Project Noisy, Crowded Offices Friction between Developers and Customers Unrealistic Expectations Lack of Effective Project Sponsorship People-Related Mistakes (2):  People-Related Mistakes (2) Lack of Stakeholder buy-in Lack of User Input Politics placed over Substance Wishful Thinking Process-Related Mistakes:  Process-Related Mistakes Overly Optimistic Schedules Insufficient Risk Management Contractor Failure Insufficient Planning Abandonment of Planning under Pressure Wasted Time during the Fuzzy Front End Shortchanged Upstream Activities Inadequate Design Process-Related Mistakes (2):  Process-Related Mistakes (2) Shortchanged Quality Assurance Insufficient Management Controls Premature or overly Frequent Convergence Omitting Necessary Tasks from Estimates Planning to Catch Up Later Code-like-Hell Programming Product-Related Mistakes:  Product-Related Mistakes Requirements Gold Plating Feature Creep Developer Gold Plating Insufficient Planning Push-me, Pull-me Negotiation Research Oriented Development Technology-Related Mistakes:  Technology-Related Mistakes Silver Bullet Syndrome Overestimated Savings from New Tools or Methods Switching Tools in the Middle of a Project Lack of Automated Source Code Control Bibliography:  Bibliography The Vasa Museum Web Site http://www.vasamuseet.se/ What Can We Learn From the Vasa? Joe Marasco, VP of Rational Software, quoted in Robillard and Kruchten, Software Engineering Process, (Addison Wesley, 2002) pages 151-152 Rapid Development: Taming Wild Software Schedules, by Steven McConnell (Microsoft Press)

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Vasa (Schiff) – Wikipedia

Die Vasa war Bestandteil einer größeren Bestellung über zwei große und zwei kleine Schiffe. Das zweite große Schiff sollte den Namen Tre Kronor (Drei ...
Read more

Vasa – Wikipedia

Vasa oder auch Wasa steht für: die schwedisch-polnische Herrscherdynastie, siehe Wasa (Dynastie) eine nach der Familie benannte Stadt in Finnland, heute Vaasa
Read more

Untergang der "Vasa": Pfusch versenkte Schwedens ...

Pfusch versenkte Schwedens Superschlachtschiff. Sie sollte die ultimative Waffe im Krieg gegen Polen werden. 64 Kanonen trug die Galeone "Vasa", die 1628 ...
Read more

Vasa Museum

Vasa Museum. Die Vasa ist das weltweit einzige verbliebene Schiff aus dem 17. Jahrhundert. Mit über 95 % erhaltener Originalteile und einer Verzierung aus ...
Read more

Vasa (ship) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Vasa (or Wasa) is a Swedish warship built between 1626 and 1628. The ship foundered after sailing about 1,300 m (1,400 yd) into her maiden voyage on 10 ...
Read more

Vasa Museum

The ships foremast is leaning. Vasa Museum researchers have taken the help of outside researchers to find out why - and how to save it.
Read more

Vaasa - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Vaasa (Finnish: [ˈʋɑːsɑ]; Swedish: Vasa, IPA: ) is a city on the west coast of Finland. It received its charter in 1606, during the reign of Charles ...
Read more

Vasa® Schwimmtrainingsbank "Trainer Pro" : Stück ...

Das Deluxe-Model. Bei der Vasa Trainer Rollbank Pro wird gegen Körpergewicht und eingestellte Neigung des Rollholms trainiert. Zusätzliche Bremsgummis...
Read more

Vasa-Museum - Stockholm - Bewertungen - Lohnt es sich?

Vasa-Museum, Stockholm: 18.076 Bewertungen und 6.519 Fotos von Reisenden. Vasa-Museum ist auf Platz 1 von 282 Stockholm Aktvititäten bei TripAdvisor.
Read more

University of Vaasa

University of Vaasa P.O. Box 700 FI-65101 Vaasa FINLAND Street Address: Wolffintie 34 65200 Vaasa Tel +358 29 449 8000. Registrar Contact Information.
Read more