Values based transformative learning

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Information about Values based transformative learning
Leadership & Management

Published on November 10, 2014

Author: JohnJSarno

Source: slideshare.net

Description

John's break through curricula on transformational leadership and sustainable enterprises

1. Values-Based Transformative Learning and the Sustainable Management Practicum 1 | P a g e John J. Sarno 2010 This material can be used with attribution Designed to liberate teaching from artificial didactic structures, post-industrial deconstructionist learning exacerbates the worst effects of bureaucratic education. Disconnected from context, content often lacks meaning for students. Information is processed in an endless stream of images and tweets, reinforced by disengaged teaching. Shorn of historical narrative, students consume information at the expense of gaining insight. Similarly, the abstract nature of information-intensive work fragments the ethical imperative of personal responsibility that is necessary to nurture personal freedom and democratic institutions. Based on the premise that human freedom and happiness are inseparable from autonomous learning and insight into self and nature, the object of Values-Based Transformative Learning is to design a curricula that is deeply personal to students but that is simultaneously connected to social life and institutions. Thus, content is chosen for its immediacy and historical narrative and the opportunities it affords students to exercise personal choices that have important social impacts. Ethics and Public Policy: 3 credits Topics include climate change, the pharmaceutical industry, the fast-food industry, electronic privacy, right to work and labor relations, business corruption, race and gender identity, and immigration.

2. Thematically, the topics are chosen to focus on individual responsibility and free will and the recognition that bureaucratic expertise within a free market, consumption economy often results in fostering a false sense of empowerment - that often the people who believe themselves most free are the most trapped. Curricula are co-taught by teacher and students within a structure that is both democratic and mediated by the teacher when necessary. At all times, the teacher embodies and models the engaged and democratic style. Authority is defused through the class as each student is required to own their own learning experience and take responsibility for creating new knowledge and nurturing a learning environment based on dignity and respect. The teacher reasserts authority to achieve equality of ownership, facilitate risk taking and to maintain a safe environment. To help students achieve personal autonomy and gain insight, students must learn from both sides of the brain. Emotional learning takes place from each students personal narrative. Inevitably, in a globalized institution, the journey is often an immigrant story of gain and loss. Individual exercises encourage subjective evaluation and self-reflection. The teacher encourages students to "feel" the subject matter and facilitates role playing. Factual learning takes place through small-group exercises that require research, rigorous analysis and objective reasoning. Students rely on newly acquired knowledge to become "experts," simulating the power dynamics of a modern institution. The teacher has modeled an open, participatory learning environment and as the groups take control and teach the class, they are expected to engage the class in a similar fashion. To guard against passivity, students are expected to engage in active listening and are evaluated on the substance of their questions. The teacher uses these group exercises as robust teaching opportunities using a traditional Socratic method. Values-Based Transformative Learning is a curricula designed to integrate personal choice with social ethics. This occurs through both subjective and objective modalities and incorporates both subjective, emotional reasoning with objective, scientific analysis. A feedback loop and post-class survey is used to measure outcomes. The Sustainable Management Practicum: 6 credits Over the last decade, dramatic changes in the financial, energy and renewable-energy markets – and the advent of– shifting political alliances, have unleashed unprecedented challenges for leaders in traditional and new businesses alike. This Practicum examines the cycle of social needs, political response and legal and regulatory enforcement with particular emphasis on the modern corporation. The Values-Based Transformative learning experience will apply Management 2 | P a g e

3. Among premium corporate brand companies, Wal-Mart announced a plan in 2007 to ask suppliers for data on their energy efficiency and is monitoring emissions on some suppliers. Since then, at least six of the world’s largest companies are banding together to press their suppliers to release data about carbon emissions and climate-change mitigation strategies. Dell, Inc. is also improving its energy efficiency, claiming carbon neutrality mostly by purchasing environmental credits. These are financial instruments that fund environmental improvements made by others, such as running wind turbines or planting forests. Dell reasons that these credits cancel out its carbon footprint, which includes carbon emissions associated with its suppliers and customers. Other companies pledging to become carbon neutral include Google and Yahoo, both of which are working to become more energy-efficient and are also buying offsets. Both companies include in their footprints such things as their facilities' electricity use and their employees' commuting and business air travel. Google also includes the emissions produced in the manufacturing of the servers that its data centers use. Indeed, a growing number of firms around the world are setting ambitious targets for performance in not only financial terms but also in environmental and social terms. According to a 2007 McKinsey report, ninety percent of companies said that they were doing more than they were five years ago to incorporate environmental, social and governance issues into their core strategies. Entrepreneurialism Venture capitalists and entrepreneurs have been driving growth at the intersection of business and the environment. Venture capital opportunities in the sector hit $5.18 billion in 2007, up 44 percent from the year before. Silicon Valley, is where a combination of California’s environmental policies, scientific talent and entrepreneurial culture has given birth to dozens of start ups. Finance Carbon emissions trading have been steadily increasing in recent years. A central authority (usually a government or international body) sets a limit or cap on the amount of a pollutant that can be emitted. Companies or other groups are issued emission permits and are required to hold an equivalent number of allowances (or credits) which represent the right to emit a specific amount. The total amount of allowances and credits cannot exceed the cap, limiting total emissions to that level. Companies that need to increase their emission allowance must buy credits from those who pollute less. The transfer of allowances is referred to as a trade. According to financial experts, carbon permits could quickly become the world’s largest commodities market, growing as much as $3 trillion by 2020 from over $100 billion in 2009. A national and global cap-and-trade market is emerging quickly. Although the London stock exchange is currently in the lead, the New York exchange has developed a carbon trading platform, including a “Green Exchange” with nearly 100 funds already focused on green investments. International Business and Trade 3 | P a g e

4. The Kyoto Protocol is a 1997 international treaty which came into force in 2005, which binds most developed nations to a cap and trade system for the six major greenhouse gases Emission quotas were agreed by each participating country, with the intention of reducing their overall emissions by 5.2% of their 1990 levels by the end of 2012. Under the treaty, for the 5-year compliance period from 2008 until 2012, nations that emit less than their quota will be able to sell emissions credits to nations that exceed their quota. It is also possible for developed countries within the trading scheme to sponsor carbon projects that provide a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in other countries, as a way of generating tradable carbon credits. The Protocol allows this through Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and Joint Implementation (JI) projects. Further, the U.S. is expected to re-engage with the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC) -- the main international forum dedicated to addressing the climate problem. The new administration may also create a Global Energy Forum of the world’s largest emitters to focus exclusively on global energy and environmental issues and has already engaged China and India in laying the foundation for such a forum. Marketing and Brand Management In today’s networked, global economy, a full two-thirds of the value of a modern corporation is based on intangible assets, such as patents, databases, and other intellectual property; employee know-how (human capital); and brand image. While Bierce’s comment about personal responsibility may still be technically correct, “social responsibility” has become a critical component of the modern corporation. For corporations, social responsibility has become a big business. Companies spend billions of dollars doing good works -- everything from boosting diversity in their ranks to developing eco-friendly technology -- and then marketing those efforts to the public with the goal those consumers will pay a premium for products made with higher ethical standards. Brand does matter. Corporations that build their brand and manage it successfully can profit mightily. Ninety percent of companies say they are doing more now than they were five years ago to incorporate environmental, social and governance issues into their core strategies, according to a recent survey from McKinsey & Co. This has required corporations to gone beyond traditional public relations strategies to adopt sophisticated campaigns to demonstrate social responsibility and to counter attacks on their image. Corporate Communications One of the biggest cases to date for corporate sustainability officers is Kasky v. Nike, which turned on the distinction between “political” speech and “commercial’ speech.” Nike launched a campaign to demonstrate that it had taken steps to improve conditions for overseas workers, and to reassure customers that it was a company that deserved continued trust and loyalty. The company was sued under California’s unfair competition and false advertising laws, alleging that the company’s claims were misleading. The California Supreme Court that Nike’s social accountability campaign could constitute unfair competition. 4 | P a g e

5. Kasky v. Nike means that corporations have reason to be more cautious about the public statements they make. The scrutiny applied to a company’s actions and words with regard to services and practices, including environmental and social performance, have risen. Companies must be more careful about the accuracy of their public statements given the sweeping definition of commercial speech. In addition to having substantial First Amendment and due process implications, this case has a direct impact on Directors and Officers Liability Insurance, considering that unfair competition and misleading commercial speech can violate federal law as well as the laws of all 50 states. Another big issue arising from this case is whistleblower protection for employees and other stakeholders that take issue with the bona fides of a sustainability report. Law and Regulation In 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Massachusetts v. EPA, that greenhouse gases are “air pollutants.” This has opened the door for vast new government powers and has resulted in new regulations to cut harmful pollutants from power plants and other generators. Utilities across the country have already spent hundreds of millions of dollars investing in either new technology or buying emission credits on the market to meet their pollution cap. New regulations will provide a boost to environmental markets, while delivering certainty to power companies deciding on pollution reduction projects. Career Transitions As the needs of business change, there will be an increasing professional role for corporate employees who can integrate “green” strategies into the firm’s finance, marketing, supply-chain, human resources and outsourcing plans. Pankaj Bhatia, a policy expert at the World Resources Institute, a Washington-based environmental group that is working with many corporations, estimates that thousands of corporate executive positions will be created over next text ten years. In turn, a market for MBA concentrations will be created. 5 | P a g e

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