Unit Plan - Year 10 - Big Ideas of Science

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Information about Unit Plan - Year 10 - Big Ideas of Science
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Published on March 1, 2014

Author: littlevagabond

Source: slideshare.net

Description

A unit plan currently being implemented in a school on the north side of Brisbane. The unit sticks closely to the curriculum, with lessons to give students experience in a variety of research and presentation modes, culminating in a presentation as the formal assessment. The presentation must follow the progression of one of the big ideas of science through history,from its inception to our current understanding.

Unit Plan - Year 10 Big Ideas of Science EDUC6735 Science – Curriculum Foundations 2013 By Andrew Smith Adam Morrison Clancy Johsoncash Audrey Nourse

Contents Unit Plan - Year 10 Unit Outline 3 Identify Curriculum: Content Descriptions to be Taught 4 General Capabilities and Cross-Curriculum Priorities 5 Unit Vocabulary 6 Unit lesson sequence – Suggested learning activities 8 Unit organised with 5E’s 15 BIG IDEA – Timeline Presentation - Assessment Task Sheet 21 BIG IDEA – Timeline Presentation - Criteria Sheet 23 Resources List 25 2

Unit Plan – Year 10 Unit title Duration of unit Year level Big Ideas of Science 10 weeks 10 Unit outline Unit focus / description This unit focuses on the need to understand the dynamic nature of the earth and its place in the universe. It considers the relationship between technological advances, scientific discoveries and the corresponding social implications. Questions that shape the inquiry ▪ What is the scientific basis for currently accepted theory ▪ How did the sequence of scientific discoveries affect the construction of the current theory ▪ What are the implications of the currently accepted theory (short term, long term, biological, social etc...) Assessment Students choose and research a currently accepted scientific theory. Students may choose the following: ① The theory of evolution and the role of Darwin in its development ② The field of genetics and the roles of Mendel, Watson, Crick and Franklin in its development ③ The periodic table and the role of Mendeleev in its development ④ Modern cosmology and the role of scientists, such as Hubble, Hawking and Hoyle, in its development ⑤ Newtonian physics and the role Galileo played in overthrowing Aristotelian physics ⑥ Geosciences and the scientific evidence for past and present climate change. ⑦ Other theory (The appropriateness of this theory needs to be evaluated by the teacher). Students use the information researched to plan and present a timeline in a multimodal format, with explanations of the significant evidence and summaries of the key people involved in the historical development of the theory. 3

Identify Curriculum: Content Descriptions to be Taught Science Understanding Science as a Human Endeavour Biological sciences ▪ The transmission of heritable characteristics from one generation to the next involves DNA and genes. Nature and development of science ▪ Scientific understanding, including models and theories, are contestable and are refined over time through a process of review by the scientific. ▪ The theory of evolution by natural selection explains the diversity of living things and is supported by a range of scientific evidences. ▪ Advances in scientific understanding often rely on developments in technology and technological advances are often linked to scientific discoveries. Chemical sciences ▪ The atomic structure and properties of elements are used to organise them in the Periodic Table. ▪ Different types of chemical reactions are used to produce a range of products and can occur at different rates. Use and influence of science ▪ People can use scientific knowledge to evaluate whether they should accept claims, explanations or predictions. ▪ The values and needs of contemporary society can influence the focus of scientific research. Earth and space sciences ▪ The universe contains features including galaxies, stars and solar systems and the Big Bang theory can be used to explain the origin of the universe. ▪ Global systems, including the carbon cycle, rely on interactions involving the biosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. Science Inquiry Skills Literacy Planning and conducting ▪ Select and use appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to systematically and accurately collect and record data. Processing and analysing data and information ▪ Analyse patterns and trends in data, including describing relationships between variables and identifying inconsistencies. ▪ Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence. Evaluating ▪ Evaluate conclusions, including identifying sources of uncertainty and possible alternative explanations, and describe specific ways to improve the quality of the data. ▪ Critically analyse the validity of information in secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems. Communicating ▪ Communicate scientific ideas and information for a particular purpose, including constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions and representations. Physical sciences ▪ Energy conservation in a system can be explained by describing energy transfers and transformations. ▪ The motion of objects can be described and predicted using the law of physics. 4

General Capabilities and Cross-Curriculum Priorities Literacy Use scientific language and vocabulary to explain concepts of the origins of the universe and earth, its apparent expansion, global systems and the human impact considering relationships between technological advances and scientific discoveries. Numeracy Evaluate and present second hand data and information on aspects of the origins of the universe, its apparent expansion, global systems and the human impact while considering the relationships between technological advances and scientific discoveries. ICT Competence Utilise simulations to aid understanding of the relative magnitude of planetary bodies in relation to the size of the universe. Computer research to explore concepts. Critical / Creative Thinking Analyse and evaluate others’ work and summarise information. Ethical Behaviour To be considered during debating activities and discussion. Personal / Social Competence Working together to conduct research, discuss ideas and complete assessment. Provide evidence for the claims of your theory. Aboriginal / Torres Strait Investigate Indigenous history, cultural ideas and stories about their land practices and its effect on Australia’s climate and ecosystems. Islander histories and cultures Sustainability Analysing global systems to evaluate human impacts and their relevance to sustainability practices. 5

Unit Vocabulary: Specialist terms related to the following concepts Unit Vocabulary Cosmos expansion, electromagnetic radiation, telescopes, galaxies, Hubble, Doppler Effect Earth system cycles Climate Change/Ocean current atmosphere, condensation, consumer, coriolis effect, evaporation, habitat, hydrosphere, lithosphere, percolation, precipitation, producers, groundwater Sea level and biodiversity Human activity biodiversity, climate refugee, database, decomposers, fauna, flora, food chain, food web, glacier, scavengers, sea level, search engine specific heat, thermal conductivity abiotic, biotic, acidification, biodiversity, biosphere, biotic, carbon sinks, ecosystem, emissions, eutrophication services, half-life, interdependence, niche, ozone, run off, wild harvest, transpiration, photosynthesis 6

Week Lesson focus Assessment opportunities 1 ▪Identify our place in the Universe ▪Describe our interact and detection methods with the electromagnetic spectrum and instrument we use to detect ▪Describe formation of galaxies and stars 2 ▪Describing the Big Bang Theory ▪Identify evidence to support the Big Bang Theory and the age of the Universe. 3 Earth System Cycles 4 Issues on Earth – ocean current regulating global climate and causes of the greenhouse effect. 5 Issues on Earth – climate change effect on sea level and biodiversity 6 Issues on Earth – human activity affect 7 Assessment instrument 8 9 & 10 Assessment instrument ▪ Use of ICT and research skills ▪ Ability to create a concept map ▪ Ability at note-taking and visual representation ▪ Ability to describe our place in the Universe ▪ Participation in group and class discussion ▪ Ability to explain the formation of galaxies and stars ▪ Constructing a timeline ▪ Participate in practical activity ▪ Competence in numeracy graphing/interpretation ▪ Participate in concept mapping and class discussion ▪ Ability to identify components of the atmosphere/ lithosphere/ biosphere/ hydrosphere ▪ Ability to summarise carbon cycle information in a visual form ▪ Participation in group explanation of a section of the carbon cycle summary ▪ Ability to write a concise paragraph on the journey of nitrogen ▪ Ability to simply explain greenhouse effect with a diagram ▪ Ability to record data in a table and construct a graph ▪ Ability to explain movement of water in oceans ▪ Participation in group debate, explaining point of view in own words ▪ Participation in classroom discussions ▪ Answers to questions ▪ Participation in discussion on researched topic issue ▪ participation in class discussions ▪ answers to direct questioning ▪ Use of ICT and research skills ▪ formative assessment of group presentations ▪ Discussion about direction of the draft /proposal ▪ Draft and proposal proof-reading ▪ Summative assessment Assessment instrument ▪ Summative assessment 7

Unit lesson sequence – Suggested learning activities Week 1 Lesson 1-2 Focus: Engage and explore our perspectives, observation and our place in the universe By Completion of lesson: ▪ Discuss the instruments used to observe the universe in the electromagnetic spectrum ▪Understand our interactions with the electromagnetic spectrum ▪ Define the scale of the universe ▪Define Earth within the universe Suggested activities – Not all activities need to be completed 1. Perspectives of our view of the world - images/video/questions Introduce and challenge students’ perspectives of the universe through images and text. 2. Scale of the Universe 2 - interactive ICT On computers students can interactively engage and explore the scale of objects in the Universe 5. The known Universe - video/note taking/label diagrams View the video “The Known Universe.” Teacher prepares a presentation of images (all can be obtained from APOD) in ascending scale of order for the sections Earth>Sun>Milky Way>Local Group>Virgo Clusters > Galaxy Clusters. Students are to take notes and draw a labelled diagram for each section. At the end of each sections students can come to board to discuss and draw their diagram to check for understand. 3. Interacting with the Universe - ICT investigation /PowerPoint /discussion 6. Types of Galaxies and stars – brainstorm /video Teacher prepares a power point with images and short videos of Students brainstorm different types of galaxies and watch a video on the observatory telescopes in use across the world (all can be obtained from comparison of star sizes. APOD) Students are encouraged to investigate and discuss the current large observation endeavours going on right now, such as the Kepler 7. Formation of Stars and Galaxies project, Large Satellite Array etc, and relate them to the electromagnetic Students form pairs and construct a flow diagram of either star spectrum they detect. formation or galaxy formation. A star pair and galaxy pair form and explain to each other their flow concepts. 4. Electromagnetic radiation -video/concept map Brainstorm students’ concepts and understanding of light and electromagnetic radiation. View video and ICT information and refine the concept map and understanding. 8

Week 2 Lesson 3-4 Focus: Explore and Explain The Big Bang Theory and the age of the Universe By Completion of lesson: ▪Explain the evidence to support the Big Bang Theory ▪Discuss the assumptions/deductions scientist made to support the theory ▪Create a timeline of Big Bang Theory ▪ Explain the evidence to support the age of the universe Suggested activities – Not all activities need to be completed 1. Big Bang Timeline - activity Students cooperative discover the Big Bang Theory by constructing a timeline with an explanation from handouts. 2. Video Big Bang Theory – video/discussion View video with students, pausing after each section. Discuss with students each process of the Big Bang in conjunction with their timeline. Students can demonstrate understanding and explanation in their own words and ask questions about terms and phrases that need elaboration and further explaining. 3. Concept map - activity Class will create a concept-map on the board detailing the flow of evidence to support the Big-Bang and the age of universe including assumptions and deductions made by scientists. 4. Doppler Effect - Activity A large space is made and students animate the Doppler Effect. Students are assigned roles such as: constant medium- rate light pulses, slow moving objects and timer. Timer records the time it takes for a light pulse to meet an object. Students should observe the time it takes for each light pulse to reach the moving objects is longer. 5. Define the Doppler Effect - video View videos explain the Doppler effect and electromagnetic spectrum 6. Hubble’s Law - activity Students graph the distance vs. velocity of galaxies (their ‘red-shift’). They observe galaxies nearer to us display a smaller red-shift than galaxies more distant away. Students draw a gradient line and rearrange the equation to solve for time. Students learn a key evident supporting an expanding universe. 7. Conclusions –video View video of a discovery of the most distance galaxy found to date to reengage exploration of the universe. 9

Week 3 Lesson 5 - 6 Focus: Earth System Cycles By Completion of lesson: ▪ Define the 4 spheres: atmosphere, lithosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere and show how they interact ▪ Explain the water cycle and its importance to the spheres ▪ Create a concise visual representation of the carbon cycle ▪ Define an ecosystem, using terms such as biotic, abiotic and explaining the journey of nitrogen Suggested activities – Not all activities need to be completed 1. 2. Discuss ‘The Spheres’ - define Define the atmosphere, lithosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere. Link each with idea of interactions between spheres with sphere identification task. Water Cycle - practical Students build a model of the water cycle in a bottle, left in the sun, to be observed over 2 Lessons. The results are explained during the beginning of the second lesson. 3. Define Terms – Discuss/define Discussion and definition of terms of water cycle: evaporation, condensation, precipitation, percolation, and examples of each. 4. 5. ‘Ecosystem Ecology: Links In The Chain’ - video Explanation of the ecosystem interconnections between cycles 6. Ecosystem Card sort - activity Students in pairs sort organisms into producers, the various levels of consumer, and the habitat that each system is found. 7. ‘Travelling Nitrogen’ - activity Students take on the role of nitrogen travelling through the cycle to learn the different pathways taken and the relevance of nitrogen to all living things ‘Carbon Cycle Summary’ - poster activity Students work in groups to summarise information cards into a poster clearly displaying the key connections of the carbon cycle. This skill will be useful as a possible means of representation for the assignment. 10

Week 4 Lesson 7 - 8 Focus: Issues on Earth – Ocean Current Regulating Global Climate and Causes of the Greenhouse By Completion of lesson: ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ Explain the Coriolis effect is and how it is important for the formation of gyres Discuss how ocean gyres are important for the continuation of a dynamic local climate Define the greenhouse effect, both natural and enhanced Discuss the causes of enhanced greenhouse effect and the means to curb the changes Suggested activities – Not all activities need to be completed 1. ‘Fresh Water In The Arctic’ - video Students task is to write down descriptions of the water in the North Pole, as well as each of the ocean basins, paying special attention to the temperature and how it moves; students encouraged to share their descriptions 2. ‘Ocean Gyres’ - Prac Students model and investigate the surface currents within ocean gyres (using a directed worksheet, a tray of water, red and blue sequins and straws) and what happens if a gyre was to slow down. 3. ‘Gyre Mapping’ - activity Given a table describing the gyres in various locations on the earth, students complete the table and use red and blue coloured pencils to map warm and cool currents. They then use this knowledge after viewing the Beaufort Gyre animation to map what is happening to warm and cold currents 4. ‘Arctic Oscillation’ -discussion Directed class discussion on how ocean currents and the atmosphere are connected to the global climate system 5. ‘Greenhouse Effect Prac’ – activity Students set up two physical models investigating the results of the greenhouse effect with beakers, cling wrap and thermometers (one beaker sealed, the other open) 6. Greenhouse effect loop game – group activity Group activity matching the definitions of vocabulary involved in global warming as well as connected content and examples of global warming effects 7. Alt Greenhouse effect results: ‘Earth The Power Of The Planet -video / worksheet Students investigate effects of greenhouse effect not commonly known (Methane release) via worksheet questions. 8. ‘Global Warming Conference’ - group debate Groups of 2-3 use scenario cards to argue their particular case, culminating in a class vote. This gives students experience in oral explanation, which may be useful for the assignment. 11

Week 5 Lesson 9 - 10 Focus: Issues on Earth – Climate Change effect on sea level and biodiversity By Completion of lesson: ▪ Understand how specific heat and thermal conductivity affects the sea levels due to climate change. ▪ Understand the effect climate change is having on sea levels through: ice caps melting and water expansion ▪ Discussed the results of rising sea-levels on islander communities - Focussing on Tuvalu, Kiribati and Torres Strait Islands ▪ Researched an ocean biodiversity problem caused by climate change. ▪ Reflected on whether they feel a greater responsibility for the world’s biodiversity. Suggested activities – Not all activities need to be completed 1. Discrepant event: Displaying the distinctiveness of water What happens when a balloon of air and a balloon of water are heated Students learn about the effects of specific heat and thermal conductivity. Other liquids specific heats and thermal conductivities are viewed. Students can discuss the scenarios if the world wasn’t filled with water. 5. Learning research skills Through a current climate change ocean biodiversity example students learn how to research on the internet. Explanations on how to use search engines, knowing what information is important and explaining how to enter internet sites into a bibliography will be covered. 2. Climate change affecting sea levels – News Clip / discussion Students view a news clip displaying sea levels rising due to ice caps melting. Further discussion will be on another affect climate change is having on sea level through water expansion. 6. Biodiversity issues caused by climate change -researching a topic Students research an ocean biodiversity problem caused by climate change. Some suggestions are: Bleaching of Great Barrier Reef, Salination of Kakadu Ocean acidification from excess carbon dioxide 3. Increased sea-level consequences on islander communities. –Short documentaries / News Clip The significance of this for the Torres Strait Islands will be discussed and a short documentary will be viewed. Discussion questions will be: -What is a climate refugee? a. How is climate change a national security issue? -How does the issue of complete affected nations affect climate refugees? 4. Review notes on’ Biodiversity’ Upon taking notes students reflect on what biodiversity is. Students will discuss the importance of diversity within the environment. 7. Biodiversity issues caused by climate change group discussion / classroom discussion Students make groups with students who researched the same topic and discuss the problem. One person from each group talks about their topic to the whole class. Class then talks about what they have learnt. Teacher shows a short YouTube clip for each topic. (if possible) 8. Individual reflection questions Individually students reflect on whether they feel a greater responsibility for the world’s biodiversity and what they can do to help out. 12

Week 6 Lesson 11-12 Focus: Explore and Elaborate on the effect of human activity on global systems By Completion of lessons: ▪Explore relationships between biotic and abiotic factors in Biosphere ▪Explore the Gaia hypothesis as proposed by Lovelock ▪Explain and elaborate in their own words on one of five case studies of human impact in a group, presenting a concise summary of some implications for the biosphere. Suggested activities – Not all activities need to be completed 1. Scale of the Universe animation/Present Gaia Hypothesis - ICT demonstration/direct instruction Engage the students with an animation showing the scale of the universe, from subatomic particles up to galaxy clusters. Focus in on the scale that humans operate at (global to molecular) and introduce Lovelock’s Gaia Hypothesis. 2. Tug Of Truth - activity Students will be presented with a contentious question. They will then have to place a post-it note on a continuum from Strongly Agree to Strongly disagree with a justification of why they have taken this position. 3. Mind Map - activity Teacher directed activity where class puts forwards ideas regarding human impacts on global systems, and a mind map is created on the board. Build on ideas and promote discussion about links between impacts. 4. Class Discussion A class discussion directed by the following questions. Which of these issues has the most impact? Which is most relevant to you? How can we change our behaviour to stop or minimise this impact? Do you even care? Why should you care? Why is it important to understand the impact we have on our environment? This activity has a focus on ethical considerations. 5. An Australian Perspective - revise research/summarising skills This activity will scaffold the students’ task. The teacher will demonstrate researching, summarising and presenting to the class a particular aspect of the broad human impacts on the Australian environment with a focus on scientific literacy. For example Indigenous land use practices and their impact on the Australian environment, and how this changed with colonisation by Europeans. 6. Present Case Studies – groups activity Students will form groups of 5 or 6 and pick one of the following five topics; Overfishing, Air pollution, Land Clearing, Waste Disposal, Extinction. They will then be presented with one source relating to this topic as a starting point. 7. Student Research - ICT I pads booked for class to conduct research in their groups on the issue they have chosen. Teacher will float around and assist where required. 8. Student Group Presentations - Formative assessment Students will present their findings on the aspect of the Case Study they have chosen to investigate. They will have 5 minutes per group to present these to the class. 9. Summary and Reflection As a class reflect on and evaluate the presentations and the process. 13

Week 7 Lesson 13-14 Focus: Research By Completion of lesson: ▪ Draft / proposal of research for a timeline on a current scientific theory, explaining significant evidence for the theory and noting the key people involved in its development through history. The proposal / draft must show brainstorming / concept mapping, websites and videos or books used for research. Assessment options 1. The theory of evolution and the role of Darwin in its development 2. The field of genetics and the roles of Mendel, Watson, Crick and Franklin in its development 3. The periodic table and the role of Mendeleev in its development 4. Modern cosmology and the role of scientists, such as Hubble, Hawking and Hoyle, in its development 5. Newtonian physics and the role Galileo played in overthrowing Aristotelian physics 6. Geosciences and the scientific evidence for past and present climate change. 7. Other theory (The appropriateness of this theory needs to be evaluated by the teacher). Week 8 Lesson 15 – 15 Focus: Research and Planning By Completion of lesson: ▪A completed comprehensive timeline using research obtained during week 7. Must contain a bibliography. Assessment options 1. 2. 3. 4. Annotations on PowerPoint A timeline with labelled diagrams An Essay A report 5. 6. 7. 8. A method or procedure The script of a drama / skit. Song lyrics Pre-approved other Week 9 – 10 Lesson 17 – 20 Focus: Class Presentations By Completion of lesson: ▪ A multimodal presentation in front of the class that contains the main points of the written component due in week 8. Assessment options 1. 2. 3. 4. PowerPoint presentation / Micro lesson Play / Skit Homemade video Demonstration 5. 6. 7. 8. News report Song Poster Pre-approved other 14

Unit organised with 5E’s Week Single Lesson Focus Suggested Activities Identify the scale of objects in the Universe 1 Lesson ENGAGE Students challenge their perspective of the Universe. They will interact with ICT to gain a perspective of the scale of objects. Define our interaction with electromagnetic radiation and instruments used Understand the electromagnetic radiation EXPLORE Class activity of interacting with our universe. Students are stimulated with instruments we use to observe the universe and are encouraged to discuss and explore current and past projects through the use of ICT. EXPLORE/EXPLAIN Students in groups create a concept map, outlining their understanding of the electromagnetic spectrum. A video and ICT are used to refine their understanding and use of the electromagnetic radiation. Define our Place in the Universe EXPLORE Using worksheets and a power point presentation of images obtained from APOD students take notes and draw diagrams of our place in the universe. Double 2 Single Double Describe the formation of galaxies and stars Understand the Big Bang Theory and age of the universe Explain the evidence to support the Big Bang Define the concepts of the Big Bang , age of the universe and assumptions Define the Doppler Effect EXPLAIN Students create flow diagrams on the formation of star and galaxies EXPLORE Students’ in groups construct a timeline of the Big Bang Theory Assessment Opportunities ▪ Use of ICT and research skills ▪ Participation in discussion ▪ Ability to create a concept map ▪ Ability to explain our place in the Universe ▪ Ability at note-taking and visual representation ▪ Ability to explain the formation of galaxies and stars ▪ Constructing a timeline EXPLAIN View video of the Big Bang timeline pausing to discuss and explain key terms and hard to understand concepts EXPLORE Class constructs a concept map on the board of the Big Bang Theory explores the flow of evidence to support it, and the assumption and deductions made about the universe. ▪ Participate in concept mapping and discussion EXPLAIN Students will perform an activating outlining the workings of the Doppler Effect and its association with the red-shift of objects observed in space. ▪ Participate in practical activity ▪ Participate in discussion ▪ Ability in numeracy 15

Evaluate the Hubble’s Law Describing the 4 spheres on earth 3 Single Modelling the water cycle Defining the water cycle Double Summarising the carbon cycle ELABORATE Students will graph the red-shifts of galaxies and identify Hubble’s evidence to support the expanding and age Universe. EXPLAIN Using information displayed on a power point, students define the terms atmosphere, lithosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere, and suggest which spheres are interacting in various stimulus images ENGAGE/EXPLORE Students build a model of the water cycle in a plastic bottles, to be observed and explained at the beginning of the next lesson EXPLORE Students observe their model of the water cycle and make notes of the features they observe EXPLAIN/ELABORATE The observation the students make in their model leads to discussion and definition of 4 terms important to the water cycle: evaporation, precipitation, condensation and percolation. EXPLORE Using cards detailing parts of the carbon cycle, students construct a poster summarising the whole cycle, and each group sharing a section of the cycle with the class EXPLAIN/ELABORATE View the video ‘Ecosystem Ecology: Links In The Chain’ which explains the interconnectivity between earth cycles and introduces the components of the nitrogen cycle Defining an ecosystem and explaining the interconnectivity of the systems EXPLORE/EXPLAIN/ELABORATE After a brief discussion about what nitrogen is and why it is important, students play the role of nitrogen molecules through the nitrogen cycle filling out a worksheet as they go; they gain understanding of the varied pathways through the cycle and the relevance of nitrogen to living things. graphing/interpretation ▪ Self-reflection worksheet* ▪ Ability to define key terms ▪ Ability to identify components of the atmosphere/ lithosphere/ biosphere/ hydrosphere ▪ Answers to questions ▪ Answers to sphere identification visual stimuli ▪ Ability to identify components of the atmosphere/ lithosphere/ biosphere/ hydrosphere ▪ Ability to define key terms ▪ Participation in discussion ▪ Participation in construction of carbon cycle summary poster ▪ Ability to summarise carbon cycle information in a visual form ▪ Ability to explain a section of the carbon cycle summary (a useful form of presentation) ▪ Participation in group discussion ▪ Participation in the small group activity ▪ Answers to worksheet ▪ Ability to write a concise paragraph on the journey of nitrogen 16

Defining the greenhouse effect 4 ENGAGE/EXPLORE Students model the temperature difference between natural greenhouse effect and the enhanced greenhouse effect, recording and graphing results, and writing a sentence to describe the pattern of the graph EXPLAIN With the visual model in mind, students try to come up with an explanation in pairs, which leads to discussion about the processes involved in the greenhouse effect Single ELABORATE Using their understanding of the prac results, students are asked to come up with an outcome of the models being left for 2 hours; given that conclusion, what will happen on earth if the greenhouse effect continues. ENGAGE View video ‘Fresh Water in the Arctic’. Students’ task is to write down descriptions of the water in the North Pole, as well as each of the ocean basins, paying special attention to the temperature and how it moves. Students are then encouraged to share their answers with the class. EXPLAIN Read ‘The Great Nike Shoe Spill - Seattle Times Article’ and discuss the how water moves from one place to another by surface winds, and the circulation of the atmosphere (including briefly touching on the Coriolis effect Double Exploring the effect of ocean currents on climate EXPLORE Students explore the movement of water in gyres using trays of water, red and blue sequins and straws to observe circular motion, being guided by a worksheet, and answering application questions. Given a table of ocean surface currents, students plot various currents on a blank map, using red and blue pencils to denote warm and cold water. ▪ Participation in group activity ▪ Ability to record data in a table ▪ Ability to construct a graph ▪ Answer to description question ▪ Participation in group discussion ▪ Ability to simply explain greenhouse effect ▪Participation in discussion ▪ Ability to define the coriolis effect ▪ Ability to explain movement of water in oceans ▪ Participation in small group activity ▪ Answering worksheet questions ▪ Ability to plot currents from data in table ▪ Participation in discussion ▪ Participation in group debate ▪ Ability to explain point of view in 17

Evaluating climate changes and the means to curb those changes Climate change affecting sea-level height and the effects this has on island communities 5 Single ELABORATE Students view Beaufort Gyre animation and use their results to write an explanation for what is happening. own words (a useful form of presentation) Discuss the connection between the ocean currents and how they can effect changes in local climates. ▪ Self-reflection worksheet* Groups of 2-3 are given scenario cards, defining the role they are to play in the group activity. Each group is given a chance to argue their case in a Global Warming Conference, reliant on the information they have on their card. Once all the views have been heard, a class vote is taken as to whether or not to make attempts to curb climate change. ENGAGE / EXPLORE Students perform the discrepant event which clearly illustrates the uniqueness of waters specific heat and thermal conductivity. ▪ Participation in class room discussion ▪ Answers to questions ELABORATE After students view the sea-level rising news clip students discuss the implications this would have on small island communities. More news clips will be watched enabling further questions showing the problems these nations have. EVALUATION Students will be evaluated through a question game. Double Ocean biodiversity and the devastating effects of climate change Present Gaia Hypothesis 6 Single Relationships between Biotic and Abiotic EXPLORE Students choose a ocean biodiversity problem caused by climate change and investigate what is happening, why it is happening and solutions to the problem. ▪ Participation in discussion on researched topic issue. EXPLAIN Small group sharing and whole class sharing about the importance of biodiversity and seriousness of climate change. ENGAGE/EXPLORE Students observe scale of the universe animation to engage and contextualise topics with reference to earlier lessons. They are then are presented with direct instruction on the Gaia Hypothesis. Students participate in building a mind map as a class which leads into class discussion. ▪ Participation in class discussions/mind mapping ▪ Answers to direct questioning 18

factors (human impact) Revise research and summarising skills through Australian Example Group research on case studies EXPLORE/EXPLAIN Teacher scaffolds the group presentation by demonstrating researching and summarising using land use in Australia as an example. Revision for students of research and summarising skills. EXPLORE/ELABORATE In groups students research one of five case studies, with focus on a particular aspect of their choice. ▪ Self-reflection worksheet* ▪ Use of ICT and research skills Double Group presentations Class reflection and Summary 7 Single Double 8 Single Research and planning Research and planning Research and planning Write up EXPLAIN Students report back to class their findings in a short presentation EVALUATE As a class reflect on the process of group work and presentations. Summarise lesson topics. EVALUATE Students prepare a draft / proposal of research for a timeline on a current scientific theory, explaining significant evidence for the theory and noting the key people involved in its development through history. The proposal / draft must show brainstorming / concept mapping, websites and videos or books used for research. EVALUATE Students prepare a draft / proposal of research for a timeline on a current scientific theory, explaining significant evidence for the theory and noting the key people involved in its development through history. The proposal / draft must show brainstorming / concept mapping, websites and videos or books used for research. Explain / Elaborate Students prepare a completed comprehensive timeline using research obtained during week 7. Must contain a bibliography. ▪ Formative assessment of group presentations ▪Discussion about direction of the draft /proposal ▪Draft and proposal proof-reading ▪ Discussion about direction of the draft /proposal ▪ Draft and proposal proof-reading ▪ Summative assessment 19

Double Single 9 & 10 Double Research and planning Write up ELABORATE/EVALUATE Students prepare a completed comprehensive timeline using research obtained during week 7. Must contain a bibliography. ▪ Summative assessment Class Presentations EVALUATE Students show presentation to the class. EVALUATION Students show presentation to the class. ▪ Summative assessment Class Presentations ▪ Summative assessment *See reference list for details 20

BIG IDEA – Timeline Presentation Assessment Task Sheet Assignment Task: Creatively present a timeline on a current scientific theory, explaining significant evidence for the theory and noting the key people involved in its development through history. Students choose and research a currently accepted scientific theory. Students may choose the following: ① The theory of evolution and the role of Darwin in its development ② The field of genetics and the roles of Mendel, Watson, Crick and Franklin in its development ③ The periodic table and the role of Mendeleev in its development ④ Modern cosmology and the role of scientists, such as Hubble, Hawking and Hoyle, in its development ⑤ Newtonian physics and the role Galileo played in overthrowing Aristotelian physics ⑥ Geosciences and the scientific evidence for past and present climate change. ⑦ Other Theory (The appropriateness of this theory needs to be evaluated by the teacher). This assignment consists of 2 components (A) a Written Component and (B) an Oral Presentation. (A) The Written Component must be comprehensive and must take some form of a timeline explaining the significant evidence, people and events involved in the development of your scientific theory. The written component must include a bibliography/references and must address Part 1 and Part 2 Depending on the mode of presentation, your written timeline outline can be in the form of:  Annotations on PowerPoint  A Timeline with labelled diagrams  An Essay  A Report  A Method or Procedure  The Script of a Drama/Skit  Song Lyrics Note: You need to provide a clear demonstration and justification of how your written component will address the progression and development of your theory through time. This will be presented with your proposal. (B) The Presentation is to be multimodal meaning you have flexibility in how you present it. It does not need to include your entire written component; however, it must focus on a major aspect of Part 1 or Part 2. Ideas for your presentation:  PowerPoint Presentation seminar/ lecture / interactive  Play/Skit  Make a Video  Demonstration 21

     News-report Song Micro-lesson Poster Other: as long as it pre-approved by teacher and provides a valuable learning experience for the class. Your timeline needs to consist of two parts: Part 1 - A description of the current accepted theory Should include the following:     What is the current theory? Why is it important? Future development and social implications Brief comparison with other working theories Part 2 - Progression/building the Theory The follow questions could be included:  What was the idea and the evidence proposed to support this theory?  How did this theory challenge or integrate with the scientific understanding of the time?  What industrial or technological advancements at the time supported the discovery of this theory?  What industrial or technological advancements resulted from the discovery of this theory?  What obstructions or opposition (social, religious, scientific etc.) had to be overcome for this theory to be accepted? Assignment Schedule Week 5 Start of Week 5 hand out assessment task sheet Week 6 Approved Proposal due end of week 6 Must be submitted to the teacher at the end of class (or an appointment booked during lunch) in the form of flow-chart, short paragraph, dot points, etc Week 7 Research week. Draft/Plan due end of week 7 You will hand in a draft or have a meeting in week 7 to discuss your presentation and your written component for submission. must be submitted to the teacher for feedback Week 8 Research and Planning week. All written component due end of week 8 (must be submitted end of week 8 prior to commence of presentation in Week 9 and 10) Week 9 &10 Presentations 22

Criteria Sheet Australian Curriculum Year 10 Science | Task-specific standards — matrix Big Ideas Time-line Presentation Name Purpose of assessment: To develop an understanding of scientific theories, the development of these theories and their implications socially, technologically and scientifically, through excellent communication and research skills. A B C D E Science Understanding Science as a Human Endeavour Understanding Dimension The folio of student work has the following characteristics: Critical analysis and application of science knowledge to generate a timeline: Analysis and application of science knowledge to generate a timeline: Application of science knowledge to generate a timeline: • detailing an explanation of your theory and why it’s important • an detailed explanation of your theory and why it’s important • an explanation of your theory and why it is important • clearly and concise explaining the development of your theory though time. • a clear explanation of the development of the your theory through time • an explanation of your theory through the construction of a timeline Critical analysis and justified descriptions of the: Analysis and description of the: •The potential for future development of your theory and factors promoting the review of models of your theories Description of the: Statements about the: • Factors prompting the review • review of your scientific model •The potential for further development of your theory and factors prompting the review of models of your theories •The social, technological and scientific implications following the development of your theory of choice. •The social, technological and scientific implications following the development of your theory of choice. of scientific models and theories Application of science knowledge to generate: Statements of isolated science facts • minimal explanation and some development of your theory through a timeline. Isolated statements about scientific models and theories • One social, technological or scientific implication following the development of your theory of choice. • Some social, technological and scientific implications following the development of your theory of choice. 23

A B C D Evaluating Communication Skill dimension Conducting Planning and Planning and Design of appropriate presentation and timeline that: Design of appropriate presentation and timeline that: Design of presentation and timeline that: Design of Presentation and timeline that: • Meets all submission due dates • Meets most submission due dates • Meets some submission due dates • Meets no submission due dates • Shows excellent use of consultation and time management •Shows good use of consultation and time management Critical evaluation, of scientific sources of information outlining and explaining the evidence supporting the theory Evaluation of scientific sources of information outlining the evidence supporting the theory Analysis of: sources of information outlining evidence supporting your theory All relevant references in APA format Mostly relevant references in APA format References in APA format Clear and purposeful use of appropriate scientific language and representations to communicate findings and ideas though: E Coherent, concise and purposeful use of appropriate scientific language and representations to communicate findings and ideas related to your scientific theory of choice through: • Written timeline • Oral presentation • Written timeline • Oral presentation • Shows some use of consultation and time management Isolated instances of planning or consultation • Shows limited use of consultation and time management Statement of: Simple outline of resources gathered. With limited evidence supporting your theory Statement of information References No references Use of appropriate scientific language, conventions and representations to communicate findings and ideas related to your scientific theory of choice through: Use of some aspects of scientific language, conventions and representations to communicate some findings and ideas related to your scientific theory of choice through: Use of everyday language to communicate minimal findings and ideas though: • Written Timeline • Written Timeline • Oral Presentation • Oral Presentation • Witten timeline • Oral presentation 24

Resources List Week 1 – Suggested Activities 1. Perspective of our view of the world Munroe, R. (2013). Sky. XKCD. Retrieved 1 July 2013, from http://xkcd.com/1115/. 2. Scale of the Universe 2 Huang, R. (2012). Scale of the Universe 2. Retrieved 1 July 2013, from http://htwins.net/scale2/. Nemiroff, R. and Bonell, J. (2011). Powers of Ten. Astronomy Picture of the Day. Retrieved 1 July 2013, from http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110201.html. 3. Interacting with the Universe Nemiroff, R. and Bonell, J. (n.d.) Astronomy Picture of the Day Archive. Retrieved 5 July 2013, from http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html. 4. Electromagnetic Radiation Newman, Phi. (2013). The Electromagnetic Spectrum. Retrieved 5 July 2013, from http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/science/know_l2/emspectrum.html. 5. The known Universe a. Nemiroff, R. and Bonell, J. (2010) The known Universe. Astronomy Picture of the Day. Retrieved 1 July 2013, from http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100120.html. b. Nemiroff, R. and Bonell, J. (n.d.) Astronomy Picture of the Day Archive. Retrieved 5 July 2013, from http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html. 6. Types of Galaxies and Stars LumpyChiPmunk. (2010, 2 September). Largest star ever discovered, compared to our Sun. Retrieved 5 July 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4iD-9GSW-0 7. Formation of stars and galaxies a. Gabour Henyel (2011, 13 February). How stars are formed and born. Retrieved 5 July 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80eMTnnLjhs. b. Barratj (2010, 3 March). Spiral galaxy formation. Retrieved 5 July 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVNuwAtnKeg. Week 2 – Suggested Activities 1. Big Bang Timeline a. Wesley, A. (n.d.) Timeline and major events since the Big Bang. Retrieved 2 July 013, from http://www.physicsoftheuniverse.com/photo.html?images/bigbang_timeline.jpg&Timeline%20an d%20major%20events%20since%20the%20Big%20Bang b. Cosmic Timeline (2008). NCSA. Retrieved 1 July 2013, from http://archive.ncsa.illinois.edu/Cyberia/Cosmos/Images/CosmicTimeline_gr.jpg. 25

c. Grant, P. (n.d.). Big Bang timeline. Retrieved 1 July 2013, from http://patrickgrant.com/BBTL.htm. d. Mastin, L. (2009). Timeline of the Big Bang. The Physics of the Universe. Retrieved 1 July 2013, from http://www.physicsoftheuniverse.com/topics_bigbang_timeline.html. 2. Video Big Bang Theory a. Sentiencetv (2010, 8 February). The Beginning of the universe ..the big bang. Retrieved 1 July 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VOz4PkdY7aA. b. WeareStarTuff51 (2011, 14 July). Stephen Hawking – The Big Bang. Retrieved 1 July 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gs-yWMuBNr4 5. The Doppler Effect BYUIS (2008, 2 June). The Doppler Effect. Retrieved 1 July 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kg9F5pN5tlI. 7. Conclusion – video spaceRip. (2010 21 October). The Most Distant Galaxy in the Universe So Far. Retrieved 5 July 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRoDGii9Zxw Week 3 – Suggested Activities 2. a) Brooke, C. (2010). Water Cycle Lesson Plan. Retrieved fromhttp://j.mp/articgyres b) StopMoGo. (2010 May 9). ‘Water Cycle Stop Motion’ [Video file].Retrieved fromhttp://vimeo.com/11590751 5. crashcourse. (2012 Dec 18).‘Ecosystem Ecology: Links in the Chain - Crash Course Ecology #7’ [Video file].Retrieved from http://youtu.be/v6ubvEJ3KGM 7. Gardiner, L. (2005, October 19). ‘Travelling Nitrogen’. Retrieved from http://eo.ucar.edu/educators/ClimateDiscovery/ESS_lesson2_10.19.05.pdf Week 4 – Suggested Activities 1. a) Mckie, R. (1992, November 22). Oceanographers Find Lessons In The Great Nike Shoe Spill. Seattle Times. Retrieved from http://j.mp/TheGreatNikeShoeSpillST. b. VideosatNSF. (2011 April 7). ‘Fresh Water in the Arctic -- Changing Planet’ [Video file].Retrieved fromhttp://youtu.be/FxXaT7yO4TQ 2 and 3. Johnson, R. (2011). Changing Planet: The Case of the Leaky Gyre. Retrieved from http://j.mp/articgyres 26

7. roughneckghost. (2011 Sept 17). ‘Earth The Power Of The Planet - Atmosphere’ [Video file].Retrieved from http://youtu.be/J5ViCNJAkHg Week 5 – Suggested Activities 1. Nasa, (2011, September 16). Global warming – oceans of climate change [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53VdCnPAIZE 2. a) Daly. J.L. (1989). The Greenhouse Trap. Moorebank: Bantam Books b) NBC nightly news, (2012, December 5). Alert! Sea levels rising 60% faster than expected [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcTxNJGfILc 3. a) Green Cross Australia, (2008, August 19). Green Cross Australia on Channel 10 [Video file]. Video posted to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQAh48mO48U b) United Nations, (2012, March 27). Tuvalu: Sea Level Rise in the Pacific, Loss of Land and Culture [Video file]. Video posted to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-gpHgebunY c) World Council of Churches, (2011, October 12). Climate change, faith and hope in Tuvalu [Video file]. Video posted to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXxX6FeBh2c 4. a) Biodiversity (n.d). Retrieved July 2, 2013, from http://education.nationalgeographic.com.au/education/encyclopedia/biodiversity/?ar_a=1 b) Good Planet Foundation, (2012, October 18). Amazing biodiversity – Planet Ocean [Video file]. Video posted to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2WVg9OxXIU 5. a) Finding Background Information (n.d). Retrieved July 2, 2013 from http://library.buffalo.edu/help/research-tips/background/ b)Schwartz, K. L. (n.d) Learning to research on the web. Retrieved from http://www.ipl.org/div/aplus/internet.htm 8. a) GBR climate change, (2009, November 04). Coral Bleaching [Video file]. Video posted to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEdoizgeNJk 9. b) 100 places to remember, (2009, May 20). 23. Kakadu Wetlands Australia [Video file]. Video posted to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOLIMdfXZdY Week 6 – Suggested Activities 27

Lesson 11-12 Focus: Explore and Elaborate on the effect of human activity on global systems. http://www.gaiatheory.org/ Self Refection Worksheet – Suggested Activities Example of a lesson reflection worksheet. Lesson Reflection Date: _____________________________________ Name: _______________________________________________________ Class: _______________________________ 1. What are the two most important things that you have learnt? 2. What down at least one problem you have continued to struggle with? 3. What would you most like help with? 4. How do you feel in the class at the moment? Please shade in the box at the front. Interested Relaxed Worried Successful Happy Bored Rused Confused Clever Other : _______________________________ 5. What is the biggest class worry affecting your work at the moment? 6. How could we improve the classes? 28

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