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TSTCsurvival

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Published on January 22, 2008

Author: Semprone

Source: authorstream.com

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How to Survive and OSHA Inspection (and live to tell about it !):  How to Survive and OSHA Inspection (and live to tell about it !) TSTC September 2006 OSHA Fort Worth Area Office 817-581-7303 :  OSHA Fort Worth Area Office 817-581-7303 Area Director: Dean Wingo Assistant Area Directors: Mike Talmont-General Industry Team Rick Ranck – Construction Team Tremendous Resource- OSHA Webpage:  Tremendous Resource- OSHA Webpage www.osha.gov Topic-Specific Index Technical Links www.osha-slc.gov/SLTC/ OSHA Inspections A Survival Guide:  OSHA Inspections A Survival Guide Bottom Line… Be Prepared!:  Bottom Line… Be Prepared! Proactive hazard identification and abatement Slide6:  What triggers an OSHA inspection? What are the primary areas of concern? How can you participate in an inspection…and survive? OK… You’re Prepared but… You’re Still Nervous What triggers an OSHA inspection?:  What triggers an OSHA inspection? Why are you inspecting me and not the guy down the street? or Inspection Priorities:  Inspection Priorities Imminent Danger Fatality or Catastrophe 3 or more hospitalized in-patient Complaint or Referral Programmed Inspections Programmed Inspections:  Programmed Inspections Site Specific Targeting (SST):  Site Specific Targeting (SST) General Industry OSHA Data Initiative Collect OSHA 200 logs 80,000 employers 40 or more employees LWDCR High = 8.0 or higher Letter Inspect list = 14.0 or higher Supplemental inspection list 8.0 or higher www.osha-slc.gov/OshDoc/Directive_data/CPL_2-2001_01.html Mechanical Power Press - Amputations:  Mechanical Power Press - Amputations General Industry National Emphasis Program Mechanical Power Presses Amputations 4 S’s and a P Saws, Shears Slicers, Slitters Power Presses (All) SIC’s with highest number of violations www.osha-slc.gov/OshDoc/Directive_data/CPL_2-1_24.html Lead:  Lead National Emphasis Program Potential exposure to lead General Industry Complaints & referrals List of sites Construction Complaints & referrals List of sites www.osha-slc.gov/OshDoc/Directive_data/CPL_2-0_130.html Silicosis – Silica Exposure:  Silicosis – Silica Exposure Special Emphasis Program General Industry SIC’s with history of overexposure to Si Construction SIC’s with known Si hazard operations Observation Abrasive blasting Dry-cutting concrete www.osha-slc.gov/Silica/SpecialEmphasis.html Excavation & Trenching:  Excavation & Trenching Construction National Emphasis Program Hazards No shoring or other cave-in protection over 5’ No shoring or other protection if cave-in indicators Water accumulation Lack of safe egress (Ladder, 25’ travel) Spoil pile less than 2’ from the edge No inspection by a competent person Complaint/Referral Observation www.osha-slc.gov/OshDoc/Directive_data/CPL_2_69.html Fall Protection in Construction:  Fall Protection in Construction Regional Emphasis Program Fall Hazards Open-sided floors or floor openings Steel erection-iron workers Scaffolds or work platforms Commercial roofs Complaint or Referral Observation Construction Inspection System:  Construction Inspection System Programmed Inspection List University of Tennessee Construction Resource Analysis Group F.W. Dodge Reports Neutrally selected sites 30% to 60% complete Focused Construction Inspections:  Focused Construction Inspections Safety and Health Program Per 29 CFR 1926 Subpart C Designated person responsible for and capable of implementing Focus 4 leading hazards Any other serious hazards observed If S&H program not effectively implemented Comprehensive inspection www.osha-slc.gov/OshDoc/Interp_data/I19940822B.html Who Gets the Citations? Multi-Employer Worksite Policy:  Who Gets the Citations? Multi-Employer Worksite Policy Creating Employer who caused the hazard Exposing Employer whose employees were exposed to the hazard Correcting Employer who was responsible for correcting the hazard Controlling Employer with general supervisory authority over the worksite with the power to correct violations directly or indirectly http://www.osha-slc.gov/OshDoc/Directive_data/CPL_2-0_124.html What are the Primary Areas of Concern in Construction & General Industry?:  What are the Primary Areas of Concern in Construction & General Industry? 4 Leading Construction Hazards 90% of Injuries & Fatalities:  4 Leading Construction Hazards 90% of Injuries & Fatalities Falls floors, platforms, roofs, scaffolds Struck by falling objects, vehicles Caught in cave-ins, unguarded machinery/equipment Electrical overhead power lines, power tools/cords, outlets, temporary wiring Most Frequently Cited Serious Violations:  Most Frequently Cited Serious Violations Construction – FY 2005 Most Frequently Cited Serious Violations in Construction – FY 2005:  Most Frequently Cited Serious Violations in Construction – FY 2005 Fall hazards training program Head protection Scaffolds - Platform construction Employee training programs Aerial lifts – Body belt & lanyard Scaffolds - Fall protection Fall protection - Unprotected sides & edges Fall protection – Residential construction 6’ or more Portable ladders 3 feet above landing surface Scaffolds - Access Standard & Subpart - 1926. - - There were also 317 Section 5(a)(1) violations cited in construction SIC codes (1500 – 1799) during this period. Subpart C - General Safety & Health (1926.20 - 35):  Subpart C - General Safety & Health (1926.20 - 35) Employee training programs Inspections by competent person Initiate and maintain accident prevention programs Personal protective equipment – Employer responsibility Housekeeping Subpart D - Occupational Health & Environmental Controls (1926.50 - 66) :  Subpart D - Occupational Health & Environmental Controls (1926.50 - 66) Gases, vapors, fumes, dusts & mists - Employee exposure Lead - Exposure assessment First aid training Lead – Interim personal protective clothing & equipment Gases, vapors, etc. – Administrative/Engineering controls Subpart E - Personal Protective & Life Saving Equipment (1926.95 - 107):  Subpart E - Personal Protective & Life Saving Equipment (1926.95 - 107) Head protection Required eye & face protection – ANSI requirements PPE - Provided, used & maintained Eye & face protection Life jackets/vests Subpart F - Fire Protection & Prevention (1926.150 - 159):  Subpart F - Fire Protection & Prevention (1926.150 - 159) Extinguishers within 50 ft. of flammables/combustibles 2A fire extinguishers - Building area Fire protection program LP-Gas systems – Protection from vehicular traffic Flammable/combustible liquids dispensing units – Protection from damage Subpart G - Signs, Signals & Barricades (1926.200 - 203):  Subpart G - Signs, Signals & Barricades (1926.200 - 203) Traffic control signs/devices - Requirements Barricades - Requirements Flaggers – Proper signaling by & use of Traffic signs at points of hazard Visible signs & symbols Subpart H - Materials Handling, Storage, Use & Disposal (1926.250 - 252):  Subpart H - Materials Handling, Storage, Use & Disposal (1926.250 - 252) Rigging equipment inspection & removal from service Torn/cut synthetic web slings - Removal from service Alloy steel chain slings - Identification Exterior drop chutes Rigging equipment – Custom lifting accessories marked & proof-tested Subpart I - Tools: Hand & Power (1926.300 - 307):  Subpart I - Tools: Hand & Power (1926.300 - 307) Woodworking tools - ANSI requirements Guarding of rotating/moving parts Tools designed for guards - Guards in place Guarding of circular saws Guarding of circular crosscut table saws Subpart J - Welding & Cutting (1926.350 -354):  Subpart J - Welding & Cutting (1926.350 -354) Cylinders secured upright Fire extinguishing equipment in area Oxygen cylinder storage Valve protection caps Use of device to keep cylinders steady while in use Subpart K - Electrical (1926.400 - 449):  Subpart K - Electrical (1926.400 - 449) Ground fault protection Grounding path Equipment installation & use Ground-fault circuit interrupters Worn/frayed cords & cables Pull boxes, junction boxes & fittings - Covers Subpart L - Scaffolds (1926.450 - 454):  Subpart L - Scaffolds (1926.450 - 454) Scaffolds above 10 ft. - Fall protection Scaffold access Scaffold platform construction Aerial lifts - Body belt & lanyard Training for employees using scaffolds Subpart M - Fall Protection (1926.500 - 503):  Subpart M - Fall Protection (1926.500 - 503) Fall protection - Residential construction 6’ or more Fall hazards training program Fall protection - Unprotected sides & edges Fall protection - Roofing work on low-slope roofs Fall protection – Steep roofs Subpart N - Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Elevators & Conveyors (1926.550 - 556):  Subpart N - Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Elevators & Conveyors (1926.550 - 556) Cranes and derricks – Manufacturers’ specifications Competent person Clearances between power lines & equipment Swing radius at rear of crane barricaded Employees kept clear of loads Subpart O - Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, & Marine Operations (1926.600 - 606):  Subpart O - Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, & Marine Operations (1926.600 - 606) Earthmoving/compacting equipment - Reverse signal alarm Bi-directional machines - Horn Suspended heavy equipment blocked or cribbed Lifting/hauling equipment - Use of safety platform Industrial trucks - ANSI B56.1-1969 Slide36:  Subpart P - Excavations (1926.650 - 652) Employee protection in excavations - Protective system use Inspections by competent person Protection from falling/rolling materials/equipment Egress from trench excavations Competent person inspection - Employees removed from hazard Subpart Q - Concrete & Masonry Construction (1926.700 - 706):  Subpart Q - Concrete & Masonry Construction (1926.700 - 706) Reinforcing steel - Guarding Masonry walls - Bracing Masonry walls – Limited access zone prior to start Formwork – Capable of supporting loads Subpart R – Steel Erection (1926.750 - 761) :  Subpart R – Steel Erection (1926.750 - 761) Protection from fall hazards Perimeter safety cables Fall protection for connectors – 15’ to 30’ Fall hazard training Fall protection for connectors – More than 2 stories or 30’ Subpart T - Demolition (1926.850 - 860) :  Subpart T - Demolition (1926.850 - 860) Engineering survey - Prior to operations Inspections by competent person during demolition Floor openings covered Fire, flood, explosion damage – Shoring/bracing Debris dropped through holes without use of chutes - Barricades Chutes – No material dropped outside structure unless protected Subpart X - Ladders (1926.1050 - 1060):  Subpart X - Ladders (1926.1050 - 1060) Stairrails & handrails Portable ladders 3 feet above landing surface Stairway/ladder when 19” or more break in elevation Training program Appropriate use of ladders Subpart Z - Toxic & Hazardous Substances (1926.1100 - 1152):  Subpart Z - Toxic & Hazardous Substances (1926.1100 - 1152) Asbestos - Exposure assessment by competent person Asbestos - Class I, II, & III asbestos work in regulated areas Asbestos – Prompt clean-up & disposal Asbestos - Training program Asbestos - Identify ACM/PACM* before work *Asbestos-containing material/Presumed asbestos-containing material Respiratory Protection (1910.134) Cited in Construction SIC Codes:  Respiratory Protection (1910.134) Cited in Construction SIC Codes Medical evaluation to determine employee’s ability to use respirator Fit testing prior to initial use & annually Evaluation of respiratory hazards Qualitative or quantitative fit testing Written respiratory protection program Standard: 1910. Powered Industrial Truck Operator Training [1910.178(l)] Cited in Construction SIC Codes:  Powered Industrial Truck Operator Training [1910.178(l)] Cited in Construction SIC Codes Training prior to truck operation Training: Formal & operator performance evaluation Operator certification Standard: 1910. Operator competency Hazard Communication (1910.1200) Cited in Construction SIC Codes:  Hazard Communication (1910.1200) Cited in Construction SIC Codes Written program Information & training Material Safety Data Sheets readily accessible Training initially & for new hazards Material Safety Data Sheets Standard: 1910. Leading Hazards in General Industry:  Leading Hazards in General Industry Most frequently cited Manufacturing Haz Comm Lockout/tagout Machine guarding Respiratory Protection Electrical wiring Mechanical power press Mechanical power transmission equipment Electrical Systems Noise exposure PPE Guarding floor & wall openings & holes www.osha.gov/oshstats/std1.html OSHA Most Frequently Cited Serious Violations:  OSHA Most Frequently Cited Serious Violations General Industry - FY-2005 Most Frequently Cited Serious Violations in General Industry FY 2005:  Most Frequently Cited Serious Violations in General Industry FY 2005 Machine guards - General Eye & body flushing facilities Point of operation Open-sided floors Pulleys Lockout/Tagout - Program Grinders-Tongue guards Hazard Communication – Information & Training Note: There were also 1127 Section 5(a)(1) General Duty Clause violations cited for all inspections during this period. Lockout/Tagout -Procedures Hazard Communication – Written Program Subpart D - Walking/Working Surfaces (1910.21 - 30):  Subpart D - Walking/Working Surfaces (1910.21 - 30) Open-sided floors Housekeeping Wet floors Stair railings Floor holes Standard: 1910. Subpart E – Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, and Fire Prevention Plans (1910.33 - 39):  Subpart E – Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, and Fire Prevention Plans (1910.33 - 39) Exit route doors unlocked Exit marking Exit access signs Standard: 1910. “Not an Exit” signs Exit routes free & unobstructed Subpart F - Powered Platforms (1910.66 - 68):  Subpart F - Powered Platforms (1910.66 - 68) Standard: 1910. Body belt & lanyard when working from aerial lift Trained operators for aerial lift Secure work position for employees in basket Subpart G - Occupational Health (1910.94 - 98):  Subpart G - Occupational Health (1910.94 - 98) Hearing conservation program Administrative/Engineering controls Standard: 1910. Audiometric testing program Training program Monitoring program Subpart H - Hazardous Materials (1910.101 - 126):  Subpart H - Hazardous Materials (1910.101 - 126) Standard: 1910. Spray areas – Free from combustible residue Class I liquids - Dispensing Compressed gases - Handling, storage & use Spray areas – Approved wiring & equipment Sources of ignition - Precautions Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment (1910.132 - 139):  Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment (1910.132 - 139) Personal protective equipment Eye & face protection PPE hazard assessment Standard: 1910. Written respiratory protection program Medical evaluation to determine employee’s ability to use respirator Subpart J - General Environmental Controls (1910.141 - 147):  Subpart J - General Environmental Controls (1910.141 - 147) Lockout/Tagout - Program Lockout/Tagout - Training Lockout/Tagout - Procedures Lockout/Tagout - Content of energy control procedures Standard: 1910. Lockout/Tagout procedure - Periodic inspection Subpart K - Medical & First Aid (1910.151 - 152):  Subpart K - Medical & First Aid (1910.151 - 152) Eye & body flushing facilities First aid Standard: 1910. Subpart L - Fire Protection (1910.155 - 165):  Subpart L - Fire Protection (1910.155 - 165) Extinguishers - Training program Extinguishers - Initial & annual training Extinguishers - Provided & accessible Standard: 1910. Extinguishers - Annual checks Extinguishers – Charged & operable Subpart M - Compressed Gas & Air Equipment (1910.166 - 169):  Subpart M - Compressed Gas & Air Equipment (1910.166 - 169) Pressure gage/safety valve Safety valves tested Standard: 1910. Subpart N - Materials Handling & Storage (1910.176 - 184) :  Subpart N - Materials Handling & Storage (1910.176 - 184) Standard: 1910. Powered Industrial Trucks – Operator competency Powered Industrial Trucks – Safe operating condition Secure storage Powered Industrial Trucks – Operator certification Powered Industrial Trucks –Examination for defects Subpart O - Machinery & Machine Guarding (1910.211 - 219):  Subpart O - Machinery & Machine Guarding (1910.211 - 219) Machine guards - General Grinders - Tongue guards Pulleys Point of operation Grinders - Work rests Standard: 1910. Subpart P - Hand & Portable Powered Tools (1910.241 - 244):  Subpart P - Hand & Portable Powered Tools (1910.241 - 244) Compressed air for cleaning Portable grinders - Guards Standard: 1910. Condition of tools & equipment Portable grinders - General Subpart Q - Welding, Cutting & Brazing (1910.251 - 255):  Subpart Q - Welding, Cutting & Brazing (1910.251 - 255) Oxygen cylinder storage - Separation Cylinder storage - Inside of buildings Protection from arc welding rays Valve caps in place Arc welding/cutting - Maintenance of cables Standard: 1910. Subpart R - Special Industries (1910.261 - 272):  Subpart R - Special Industries (1910.261 - 272) Standard: 1910. Logging – Foot protection Logging - First aid training Logging – Written certification of training Logging – Face protection Logging – Employee training Subpart S - Electrical (1910.301 - 399):  Subpart S - Electrical (1910.301 - 399) Live parts Grounding path Electrical box covers Conductors entering cabinets/boxes/fittings protected from abrasion Standard: 1910. Proper installation & use of equipment Subpart Z - Toxic & Hazardous Substances (1910.1000 - 1450):  Subpart Z - Toxic & Hazardous Substances (1910.1000 - 1450) Hazard Communication - Written program Hazard Communication - Information & training Hazard Communication - Label identification Hazard Communication - Training initially & for new hazards Hazard Communication - Material Safety Data Sheets Standard: 1910. How can you participate in an OSHA inspection…and survive?:  How can you participate in an OSHA inspection…and survive? Words to the Wise:  Despite rumors to the contrary…the compliance officer is human too The compliance officer will be professional…you should be too The compliance officer is permitted to use quite a bit of professional discretion You catch more flies with honey Words to the Wise Greeting the Compliance Officer:  Greeting the Compliance Officer You usually set the tone for the inspection The Inspection Process:  The Inspection Process Opening Conference Walk Around Photographs and/or Videotape Sampling Interviews Closing Conference Informal Conference Contest Opening Conference:  Opening Conference Present Credentials Explain Purpose Scope Permitting the Inspection:  Permitting the Inspection To refuse or not to refuse---that is the question? Don’t prevaricate!:  Don’t prevaricate! The compliance officer will notice the slight elongation of your nose Consequences of Prevarication:  Consequences of Prevarication Construction…your activity may have been under surveillance for hours/days/weeks General Industry…will everyone else’s story match yours? Once you lose your credibility…the compliance officer is not going lend much credence to anything else you say You just lost the “benefit of the doubt” Walkaround Tip:  Walkaround Tip Take someone with you that can correct any deficiencies noted Photographs and/or Videotape:  Photographs and/or Videotape The compliance officer will document what he/she sees Warn the compliance officer if it is a Trade Secret Not everything is a Trade Secret You may also photograph or videotape Interviews:  Interviews Employees Private Without management present Employee may request union rep Management Compliance officer decides who participates Sampling:  Sampling Employee exposures Dosimeters Pumps Badges Other devices The Closing Conference:  The Closing Conference Take notes Violations and corrective actions Penalties OSHCon Contest rights Informal Conference Informal Conference:  Informal Conference AD or AAD Your side of the story Penalty reduction Offer something in return Not just abatement of the hazard…because you are already required to abate the hazard Think improvements to safety & health program and additional training The Contest:  The Contest Notice of contest must be in writing --15 working days after citation receipt You can contest violations, penalties or time to correct. Hearing before Review Commission Judge Survival Summary:  Survival Summary Be Prepared:  Be Prepared Proactive hazard identification and abatement Be Professional You set the tone for the inspection If you’re reading this… Thank you for your attention and please nudge the person next to you if they’re asleep… the next speaker is pretty good!:  If you’re reading this… Thank you for your attention and please nudge the person next to you if they’re asleep… the next speaker is pretty good!

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