Thurs1415.Grey.McMahon

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Information about Thurs1415.Grey.McMahon

Published on July 10, 2008

Author: TCC08

Source: slideshare.net

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From Grey to Green: Rethinking Cities Built for Cars
* Greening an Old City: The Baltimore Experience - Patrick McMahon, Kittelson & Associates, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Greening the Old City: Baltimore’s Sustainability Program Introduction Background on Baltimore Overview of Baltimore’s Sustainability Program Transportation Initiatives prior to the Sustainability Program Crafting a “Vision” Goals, Strategies, & Indicators

Introduction

Background on Baltimore

Overview of Baltimore’s Sustainability Program

Transportation Initiatives prior to the Sustainability Program

Crafting a “Vision”

Goals, Strategies, & Indicators

Introduction Patrick J. McMahon, AICP Professional Background Master’s in City & Regional Planning, UNC-Chapel Hill 4 years at Kittelson & Associates, Inc. Prior work with non-profits Advocacy Greater Baltimore Sierra Club Transportation Chair Bike & bus commuter MPO Citizen Advisory Committee

Patrick J. McMahon, AICP

Professional Background

Master’s in City & Regional Planning, UNC-Chapel Hill

4 years at Kittelson & Associates, Inc.

Prior work with non-profits

Advocacy

Greater Baltimore Sierra Club Transportation Chair

Bike & bus commuter

MPO Citizen Advisory Committee

Baltimore History First settled in 1729 Early settlements merged in 1745, City incorporated in 1796 Significant growth between Civil & World Wars Dense rowhomes Over ½ of current City housing stock, roughly 30 units/acre) Extensive streetcar network (300+ miles of track in the ’40s) Post-War decline Loss of manufacturing jobs Drugs, crime, jobs, & schools all contribute to population loss Loss of 1/3 of population in City between 1950 & 2000 Waterfront “renaissance” Stopped freeways, removed docks, built tourist attractions New political leadership Cleaner, Greener, Healthier, & Safer

First settled in 1729

Early settlements merged in 1745, City incorporated in 1796

Significant growth between Civil & World Wars

Dense rowhomes

Over ½ of current City housing stock, roughly 30 units/acre)

Extensive streetcar network (300+ miles of track in the ’40s)

Post-War decline

Loss of manufacturing jobs

Drugs, crime, jobs, & schools all contribute to population loss

Loss of 1/3 of population in City between 1950 & 2000

Waterfront “renaissance”

Stopped freeways, removed docks, built tourist attractions

New political leadership

Cleaner, Greener, Healthier, & Safer

Existing Transportation Conditions Proximity of Jobs to Downtown Density 43.54% 56.46% 17.60% 890,673 Baltimore, MD PMSA Share outside 10 mile Within 10 miles of CBD Within 3 miles of CBD Total employment Metro Region +/-0.9 28.2 Mean travel time to work (minutes) 2% +/-983 5,946 Worked at home 2% +/-1,172 4,645 Other means 8% +/-2,475 20,549 Walked 20% +/-4,270 50,519 Public transportation (excluding taxicab) 10% +/-2,680 27,017 Car, truck, or van -- carpooled 58% +/-5,834 149,697 Car, truck, or van -- drove alone +/-6,056 258,373 Workers 16 years and over Baltimore Commuting Patterns (2006 American Community Survey) Density City 7,054/mi² Oakland, California 25 7,217/mi² Buffalo, New York 24 7,693/mi² Baltimore, Maryland 23 7,972/mi² Los Angeles, California 22 9,070/mi² Washington, District of Columbia 21 10,780/mi² Yonkers, New York 20 10,852/mi² Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19 11,534/mi² Miami, Florida 18 11,548/mi² Newark, New Jersey 17 11,750/mi² Hamtramck, Michigan 16 11,768/mi² Hialeah, Florida 15 12,166/mi² Boston, Massachusetts 14 12,306/mi² Santa Ana, California 13 12,502/mi² Miami Beach, Florida 12 12,603/mi² Chicago, Illinois 11 15,471/mi² [3] Central Falls, Rhode Island 10 15,852/mi² Jersey City, New Jersey 9 16,086/mi² Chelsea, Massachusetts 8 16,443/mi² San Francisco, California 7 17,675.4/mi² Paterson, New Jersey 6 18,633/mi² [1] [2] Somerville, Massachusetts 5 26,348/mi² New York, New York 4 30,239/mi² Hoboken, New Jersey 3 44,352/mi² West New York, New Jersey 2 52,978/mi² Union City, New Jersey 1

Major US Cities Non-Auto Commuting & Carless Households 27.32% 14.05% 1.19% 20.59% 5.35% 484,674 New Orleans city, Louisiana 11 26.71% 11.60% 0.56% 15.91% 3.75% 362,563 Miami city, Florida 12 25.17% 10.90% 0.35% 15.36% 4.11% 348,189 St. Louis city, Missouri 13 24.57% 12.20% 0.22% 16.52% 4.10% 478,393 Cleveland city, Ohio 14 28.56% 44.54% 32.64% 9.82% 2.08% 776,733 San Francisco city, California 10 2000 Census % Households w/o a car % Total Non-Car Commuters % Public Transit Commuters % Pedestrian Commuters % Bike Commuters Population Place Rank 23.58% 15.61% 0.33% 19.58% 3.64% 416,629 Atlanta city, Georgia 15 28.85% 33.02% 26.71% 5.80% 0.51% 2,895,964 Chicago city, Illinois 9 29.44% 16.65% 11.11% 5.30% 0.23% 334,563 Pittsburgh city, Pennsylvania 8 31.42% 18.39% 12.52% 5.43% 0.44% 292,648 Buffalo city, New York 7 34.91% 47.42% 33.07% 13.36% 0.99% 589,141 Boston city, Massachusetts 6 35.73% 19.04% 13.70% 4.87% 0.46% 1,517,550 Philadelphia city, Pennsylvania 5 35.89% 27.56% 19.94% 7.28% 0.34% 651,154 Baltimore City, Maryland 4 36.93% 47.95% 34.47% 12.27% 1.21% 572,059 Washington city, DC 3 44.17% 35.06% 26.81% 8.03% 0.22% 273,546 Newark city, New Jersey 2 55.70% 65.55% 54.35% 10.72% 0.48% 8,008,278 New York city, New York 1

Economic Sustainability A study by the Center for Housing Policy found that the average annual transportation cost for low- to moderate-income residents in Baltimore was $9,506, or 29% of their income.

A study by the Center for Housing Policy found that the average annual transportation cost for low- to moderate-income residents in Baltimore was $9,506, or 29% of their income.

Past Missteps Extensive transit network proposed in 1968 has had limited implementation Light rail line built fast and cheap Shortcuts have had lasting negative impact on service & perception of transit Poor management of traffic signals in past Extensive construction of downtown parking garages Targeted towards commuter use to maintain office tenants Limited coordination between City and (State) Transit Agency Weak regional planning organization that has avoided land use

Extensive transit network proposed in 1968 has had limited implementation

Light rail line built fast and cheap

Shortcuts have had lasting negative impact on service & perception of transit

Poor management of traffic signals in past

Extensive construction of downtown parking garages

Targeted towards commuter use to maintain office tenants

Limited coordination between City and (State) Transit Agency

Weak regional planning organization that has avoided land use

Baltimore Sustainability Program Office of Sustainability Purpose: Coordinate City, non-governmental organizations, and private efforts toward sustainability goals. Advise and support the Sustainability Commission’s efforts. Lead programs of the Environmental Sub-Cabinet. Sustainability Commission Purpose: Create and implement a City-wide Sustainability Plan. Develop partnerships with government, NGO’s, businesses, and citizens to implement City-wide sustainability programs. Commission must report to City Council annually. Environmental Sub-Cabinet Purpose: Integrate elements of sustainability into all facets of City operations. Develop and coordinate City policies and programs that will improve environmental performance of City operations within a sustainable framework.

Office of Sustainability

Purpose: Coordinate City, non-governmental organizations, and private efforts toward sustainability goals. Advise and support the Sustainability Commission’s efforts. Lead programs of the Environmental Sub-Cabinet.

Sustainability Commission

Purpose: Create and implement a City-wide Sustainability Plan. Develop partnerships with government, NGO’s, businesses, and citizens to implement City-wide sustainability programs. Commission must report to City Council annually.

Environmental Sub-Cabinet

Purpose: Integrate elements of sustainability into all facets of City operations. Develop and coordinate City policies and programs that will improve environmental performance of City operations within a sustainable framework.

Office of Sustainability Work with the Sustainability Commission to develop and implement the Sustainability Plan Complete a Baltimore Green House Gas Inventory Identify and understand latest sustainability initiatives, programs and legislation Develop working relationships with other groups performing related work

Work with the Sustainability Commission to develop and implement the Sustainability Plan

Complete a Baltimore Green House Gas Inventory

Identify and understand latest sustainability initiatives, programs and legislation

Develop working relationships with other groups performing related work

Sustainability Commission Comprised of 21 Members Representing: Community Organizations Environmental Groups & Interests Labor Unions Public Health Environmental Justice Private Industry Mayor’s Office City Agencies

Comprised of 21 Members Representing:

Community Organizations

Environmental Groups & Interests

Labor Unions

Public Health

Environmental Justice

Private Industry

Mayor’s Office

City Agencies

Environmental Sub-Cabinet Develop and coordinate City policies and programs that will improve environmental performance of City operations within a sustainable framework Report to the Mayor’s Cabinet on sustainability issues important to the City, initiatives, policies and programs

Develop and coordinate City policies and programs that will improve environmental performance of City operations within a sustainable framework

Report to the Mayor’s Cabinet on sustainability issues important to the City, initiatives, policies and programs

Meeting the environmental, social, and economic needs of Baltimore without compromising the ability of future generations to meet these needs. Working Definition of Sustainability Economic Prosperity Social Equity Environmental Protection

Guiding Principles of Sustainability Commission & Plan Inclusiveness – Adopt a broad definition of “environment” as issues are explored Engagement – Engage a wide range of the public, including those not normally connected to a traditional environmental agenda Translation – Communicate issues, ideas, and goals in ways that are meaningful to all citizens

Inclusiveness – Adopt a broad definition of “environment” as issues are explored

Engagement – Engage a wide range of the public, including those not normally connected to a traditional environmental agenda

Translation – Communicate issues, ideas, and goals in ways that are meaningful to all citizens

Sustainability Plan - Purpose Engage the Baltimore community in a comprehensive discussion on sustainability Inventory existing programs, organizations, and resources Articulate and prioritize sustainability goals for the Baltimore community Serve as roadmap for future legislation, public/private partnerships, programs, educational campaigns, etc.

Engage the Baltimore community in a comprehensive discussion on sustainability

Inventory existing programs, organizations, and resources

Articulate and prioritize sustainability goals for the Baltimore community

Serve as roadmap for future legislation, public/private partnerships, programs, educational campaigns, etc.

Sustainability Plan - Content Plan will include: Baseline information on community sustainability Vision statements for what a Sustainable Baltimore would look like Clear goals to move us towards this vision Indicators and targets to measure progress towards these goals Priority initiatives to meet these goals

Plan will include:

Baseline information on community sustainability

Vision statements for what a Sustainable Baltimore would look like

Clear goals to move us towards this vision

Indicators and targets to measure progress towards these goals

Priority initiatives to meet these goals

Sustainability Plan Plan goals: Engage the Baltimore community in a comprehensive discussion on sustainability Inventory existing programs, organizations, and resources Articulate and prioritize sustainability goals for the Baltimore community Serve as roadmap for future legislation, public/private partnerships, programs, educational campaigns, etc. Plan content: Baseline information on community sustainability Vision statements for what a Sustainable Baltimore would look like Clear goals to move us towards this vision Indicators and targets to measure progress towards these goals Priority initiatives to meet these goals

Plan goals:

Engage the Baltimore community in a comprehensive discussion on sustainability

Inventory existing programs, organizations, and resources

Articulate and prioritize sustainability goals for the Baltimore community

Serve as roadmap for future legislation, public/private partnerships, programs, educational campaigns, etc.

Plan content:

Baseline information on community sustainability

Vision statements for what a Sustainable Baltimore would look like

Clear goals to move us towards this vision

Indicators and targets to measure progress towards these goals

Priority initiatives to meet these goals

Working Groups Energy & Air Water Waste Green Infrastructure Built Environment Transportation

Energy & Air

Water

Waste

Green Infrastructure

Built Environment

Transportation

 

Transportation Working Group Gathering public input on plan content 3 public “listening” meetings over this summer Diverse group City Staff DOT & Health Dept. Transit agency staff Regional transportation advocacy groups H.S. student Bike collective University Transportation Director Local transit riders & advocates Environmental justice researcher

Gathering public input on plan content

3 public “listening” meetings over this summer

Diverse group

City Staff

DOT & Health Dept.

Transit agency staff

Regional transportation advocacy groups

H.S. student

Bike collective

University Transportation Director

Local transit riders & advocates

Environmental justice researcher

Sustainability Plan Timeline April Commission Members Sworn-in May 27 Sustainability Plan Kick-off Meeting June - Sept. Working Group “Listening Sessions” October 28 Next Public Presentation Meeting Fall 2008 Draft of Sustainability Plan Early 2009 Plan will be sent to City Council for approval

April Commission Members Sworn-in

May 27 Sustainability Plan Kick-off Meeting

June - Sept. Working Group “Listening Sessions”

October 28 Next Public Presentation Meeting

Fall 2008 Draft of Sustainability Plan

Early 2009 Plan will be sent to City Council for approval

Existing Transportation Initiatives Transit Trip planning on Google Maps On-going planning for Red Line, Charles St. Trolley, & Green Line Red Line Summit Transit signal priority on Howard Street Free City Shuttle System (Summer ’09) Bicycling Bike Master Plan Collegetown Bike Network (bike lanes, sharrows, floating bike lanes) Bike parking to be added to a downtown City garage Velocipede (non-profit bike repair / build your own bike) Car-sharing Flexcar (now Zipcar on JHU campus) City planning creation of Maryland CarShare City Master Plan (Live - Earn - Play - Learn) Live Near Your Work

Transit

Trip planning on Google Maps

On-going planning for Red Line, Charles St. Trolley, & Green Line

Red Line Summit

Transit signal priority on Howard Street

Free City Shuttle System (Summer ’09)

Bicycling

Bike Master Plan

Collegetown Bike Network (bike lanes, sharrows, floating bike lanes)

Bike parking to be added to a downtown City garage

Velocipede (non-profit bike repair / build your own bike)

Car-sharing

Flexcar (now Zipcar on JHU campus)

City planning creation of Maryland CarShare

City Master Plan (Live - Earn - Play - Learn)

Live Near Your Work

Sustainable Transportation European Council of Ministers of Transport (2004) Allows the basic access and development needs of individuals, companies and society to be met safely and in a manner consistent with human and ecosystem health, and promotes equity within and between successive generations. Is affordable, operates fairly and efficiently, offers a choice of transport mode and supports a competitive economy, as well as balanced regional development Limits emissions and waste within the planet’s ability to absorb them, uses renewable resources at or below their rates of generation, and uses non-renewable resources at or below the rates of development of renewable substitutes, while minimizing the impact on the use of land and the generation of noise.

Allows the basic access and development needs of individuals, companies and society to be met safely and in a manner consistent with human and ecosystem health, and promotes equity within and between successive generations.

Is affordable, operates fairly and efficiently, offers a choice of transport mode and supports a competitive economy, as well as balanced regional development

Limits emissions and waste within the planet’s ability to absorb them, uses renewable resources at or below their rates of generation, and uses non-renewable resources at or below the rates of development of renewable substitutes, while minimizing the impact on the use of land and the generation of noise.

Crafting a Transportation Vision A diverse, accessible, efficient, integrated, safe, and environmentally-responsible transportation system that promotes ease of movement, access to opportunity, and public health. First draft for discussion

Possible Transportation Goals Bicycling Education about new facilities for drivers & cyclists Bike Boulevards (in Bike Master Plan) Shift in cultural perception of bicycling Car-Sharing Car sharing affordable and readily available in low-income neighborhoods Transit Real-time information for customers Redesigned routes & better monitoring to reduce bus bunching Streetcar network linking neighborhoods w/in 3-4 miles of downtown Enhanced bus routes in major radial corridors Citywide transit signal priority Better coordination between City & State Transit agency Land Use Dense, affordable development around rail stations & bus transfer points Policy Regional transportation planning involving coordinated planning of land use goals City advocacy against highway capacity expansion Parking Parking maximums in areas well served by transit No new garages downtown

Bicycling

Education about new facilities for drivers & cyclists

Bike Boulevards (in Bike Master Plan)

Shift in cultural perception of bicycling

Car-Sharing

Car sharing affordable and readily available in low-income neighborhoods

Transit

Real-time information for customers

Redesigned routes & better monitoring to reduce bus bunching

Streetcar network linking neighborhoods w/in 3-4 miles of downtown

Enhanced bus routes in major radial corridors

Citywide transit signal priority

Better coordination between City & State Transit agency

Land Use

Dense, affordable development around rail stations & bus transfer points

Policy

Regional transportation planning involving coordinated planning of land use goals

City advocacy against highway capacity expansion

Parking

Parking maximums in areas well served by transit

No new garages downtown

Sustainable Transp. Indicators (Litman 2008) Up User survey results. Up Comprehensive and neutral planning Up Degree to which individual planning decisions support strategic goals Up Cost-based pricing Transport Policy and Planning Up Quality of accessibility for people with disabilities Up Affordable housing accessibility Down Portion of household budgets needed to provide adequate transport. Equity Down Habitat and cultural sites degraded by transportation facilities Down Land devoted to transport facilities Down Per capita impervious surface area Land Use Impacts Up Internet access and delivery service quality Up Quality of land use accessibility Up Quality of walking, cycling, public transit, driving, taxi, etc. Overall Accessibility Up Freight transport efficiency Down per unit of travel (cost efficiency) Expenditures on roads, public transit, parking, ports, etc. Down Per capita congestion costs Down Access to employment Down Consumer expenditures on transport Economic Productivity Down Traffic crash economic costs Down Police-reported crashes Down Crash deaths and injuries Traffic Risk Down People exposed to aircraft noise above 57 LAeq,T Down People exposed to traffic noise above 55 LAeq,T Noise Pollution Down Emissions from vehicle and facility construction Down Climate change emissions (CO2, CH4) Down Ambient air quality Down Total vehicle emissions Air Pollution Emissions Reduced automobile share Portion of trips by auto, public transit, and non-motorized modes Up for low-income, down for high-income Motor vehicle travel Up for low-income, down for high-income Motor vehicle ownership Travel Activity Desired Direction Indicator Category

Conclusion Baltimore just starting down this path Strong political support Good built environment bones Need to translate to average residents Transportation affordability will be a key driver Many residents using transit but need to improve conditions

Baltimore just starting down this path

Strong political support

Good built environment bones

Need to translate to average residents

Transportation affordability will be a key driver

Many residents using transit but need to improve conditions

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