Thurs1015.Streetcars.Smith

50 %
50 %
Information about Thurs1015.Streetcars.Smith

Published on July 3, 2008

Author: TCC08

Source: slideshare.net

Description

From Streetcars to the Bus Mall and Back Again: Portland’s Use of Rail Transit to Create Proximity
* Rebuilding Portland’s Streetcar Network - Chris Smith, Portland Streetcar, Inc

PORTLAND STREETCAR EXPERIENCE PLANNED DEVELOPMENT ACHIEVED DENSITY PEOPLE APPRECIATE GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTIONS PROXIMITY RE-CREATED

PORTLAND STREETCAR

EXPERIENCE

PLANNED DEVELOPMENT ACHIEVED

DENSITY PEOPLE APPRECIATE

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTIONS

PROXIMITY RE-CREATED

LINKS RIVER DISTRICT AND NEW SOUTH WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENT AREAS TWO BROWNFIELDS ADJACENT TO THE CENTRAL CITY CONCEPT PLAN

LINKS RIVER DISTRICT AND NEW SOUTH WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENT AREAS

TWO BROWNFIELDS ADJACENT TO THE CENTRAL CITY

PORTLAND STREETCAR 2.4 mile line opened in 2001. $56.9 million cost, no federal funds. Modern low floor cars. In-street operation.

2.4 mile line opened in 2001.

$56.9 million cost, no federal funds.

Modern low floor cars.

In-street operation.

PORTLAND STREETCAR EXTENSIONS Three extensions adding 1.6 miles. Property owners paid 20% of cost. Two additional major extensions under study for federal funds. 30% higher ridership than bus.

Three extensions adding 1.6 miles.

Property owners paid 20% of cost.

Two additional major extensions under study for federal funds.

30% higher ridership than bus.

OPERATING FUNDS TriMet $ 3.0 Million City of Portland $ 1.6 Mill i on Parking Meters Portland Streetcar, Inc. $ .3 Mill i on TOTAL $ 4.9 Million

CAPITAL FINANCING SOURCES 4.0 MILES DOUBLE TRACK City of Portland $ 34.1 Million State of Oregon $ 2.1 Mill i on Federal Funds $ 7.0 Mill i on Tax Increment Funds $ 21.5 Mill i on Local Improvement Districts $ 19.4 Mill i on System Development Charges $ 2.5 Million Regional Transportation Funds $ 10.0 Mill i on Misc. (City) $ 6.6 Million TOTAL $ 103.2 Million

PORTLAND STREETCAR RESULTS $3.5 billion in private investment. 12,000 riders per day. 10,000 new housing units. This housing in high density reduces by 70 million the annual vehicle miles traveled in the region.

$3.5 billion in private investment.

12,000 riders per day.

10,000 new housing units.

This housing in high density reduces by 70 million the annual vehicle miles traveled in the region.

CONSTRUCTION KEEP IT SIMPLE 1 2 3 4 5

PURCHASED INEKON-SKODA VEHICLE CZECH REPUBLIC

More Modern Appearance Driver Seat with Pneumatic or Electrical Actuation Bogie Redesign Active Suspension (Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension) Heated Windshield Protective Side Window Film Additional Floor Space

PROMOTE HIGH DENSITY Market uncertainty for condos Density required with streetcar investment

Market uncertainty for condos

Density required with streetcar investment

$3.5 Billion of Private Sector investment along alignment

PORTLAND STREETCAR Density of Development

PORTLAND STREETCAR Percent Development on Streetcar

 

RECENT VIEW OF SOUTH WATERFRONT

CURRENT VIEW OF SOUTH WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENT

STREETCAR LOOP

STREETCAR LOOP $147 million Capital Cost. Approved for Project Development through Federal Transit Administration. Local commitment of $72 million completed. Construction scheduled to start late 2008.

$147 million Capital Cost.

Approved for Project Development through Federal Transit Administration.

Local commitment of $72 million completed.

Construction scheduled to start late 2008.

CURRENT DEVELOPMENT Existing FAR Density & Portland Streetcar Loop Source: Planning Bureau, City of Portland PLANNED DENSITY FAR Development Potential with Portland Streetcar Loop

 

 

 

TRIP NOT TAKEN Higher density reduces vehicle miles traveled. (VMT) Current Streetcar - 70 million fewer VMT Streetcar Loop – 28 million fewer VMT

Higher density reduces vehicle miles traveled. (VMT)

Current Streetcar - 70 million fewer VMT

Streetcar Loop – 28 million fewer VMT

TRAVEL MODES IN PORTLAND BY AREA Good Transit, Good Mixed Use Poor Transit, No Mixed Use

REDUCE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS High Density / Suburban Carbon Footprint Comparisons Source: E. D. Hovee & Company, LLC.

High Density / Suburban Carbon Footprint Comparisons

RIDERSHIP/VMT GROWTH 1996-2006

PROPOSED METRICS FOR TRANSIT PROJECTS Zoned Development Capacity Compact Urban Form Land Availability Market Readiness Trip Reduction Reduced Carbon Footprint

Zoned Development Capacity

Compact Urban Form

Land Availability

Market Readiness

Trip Reduction

Reduced Carbon Footprint

Major Hospital States Largest Public University City’s Largest Employers Downtown Office Core Downtown Retail Core 2 Public Fountains 2 Full-service Grocery Stores (3 rd under construction) 4+ Pharmacies 4+ Banks Proximity – the Streetcar Neighborhood

Major Hospital

States Largest Public University

City’s Largest Employers

Downtown Office Core

Downtown Retail Core

2 Public Fountains

2 Full-service Grocery Stores (3 rd under construction)

4+ Pharmacies

4+ Banks

2 Independent Bookstores (including worlds largest) 15 Movie Screens Central Library 3 Farmers Markets (on 3 days of the week) Major and minor performing arts venues 4 Brewpubs 4 Gelato shops Dozens of restaurants and bars An infinite number of Coffee Shops Proximity – the Streetcar Neighborhood

2 Independent Bookstores (including worlds largest)

15 Movie Screens

Central Library

3 Farmers Markets (on 3 days of the week)

Major and minor performing arts venues

4 Brewpubs

4 Gelato shops

Dozens of restaurants and bars

An infinite number of Coffee Shops

 

 

Add a comment

Related presentations