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Three cycles of action research

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Information about Three cycles of action research
Education

Published on September 23, 2014

Author: siewwoei

Source: slideshare.net

Description

Carried out three cycles of action research in context of an online activity, Asynchronous Discussion board.
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1. THREE ACTION RESEARCH CYCLES: REASONS ENCOURAGE OR INHIBIT ASYNCHRONOUS ONLINE DISCUSSION PARTICIPATION LING SIEW WOEI1*, KOO AH CHOO2, LIM YAN PENG3 123MULTIMEDIA UNIVERSITY, FACULTY OF CREATIVE MULTIMEDIA, 63000 CYBERJAYA, MALAYSIA

2. Who I am. lecturer at a private university in Malaysia conducted lectures larger classes of 200 students Learning Management Systems (LMS)

3. Asynchronous Online Discussion AOD) can promote critical thinking at higher education (Chiu, 2009). nurtures critical thinking mind because it is an added-value that will benefit them in the workplace (Duangjan, 2014).

4. Issue Emphasis of extrinsic motivation Evidence Lecturers worried participation would be low if none was rewarded (Graham & Scarborough, 2001). 3 to 5%, increased to 10% 20% (Graham & Scarborough, 2001; Nandi, Hamilton, Chang & Balbo, 2012).

5. Pondering : What if reward was removed? Graham and Scarborough (2001) addressed reported that some students were not even affected with the marks thus made no endeavour to participate at all.

6. Intrinsic value Spitzer (1996, p. 45) believed that motivation “should be viewed as a central element of the instruction itself. The truth is that no matter how excellent any instructional program is, learning will be no greater than the student’s level of motivation”. Deci and Ryan (1999) reward, especially mark can be damaging to a student self-willingness. Husen and Postlethwaite (1994) learners who are intrinsically motivated, but rewarded extrinsically has devalued their intrinsic interest in reading

7. Aim seeks some understanding of the reasons that has encouraged or inhibited our students to participate in an AOD as a learning activity. Graham and Scarborough (2001), using marks to reward participation may not be interest them.

8. Research methodology open-source online discussion software, Simple Machines Forum (SMF). supplement the traditional lecture classroom with 2-hours of lectures, 2- hours of hands-on activities.

9. Instrument

10. Cyclical process Action Research (AR) Spiral by Middlewood, Coleman and Lumby (1999) three aspects of self-determination dimension; structural, monitoring and involvement (Shroff & Vogel, 2009)

11. Respondents Purposeful sampling (n=198) 35 respondents in 2008, 29 respondents in 2009 134 respondents in 2010. Share commonality of area of study, age group and computer literacy.

12. Structural Dimension Learning environment and foundation will be set down to encourage the students to take part.

13. Autonomy Dimension Students will be encouraged to take charge of the environment.

14. Involvement Dimension Students will feel related and cared within the environment.

15. Structural Dimension Learning environment and foundation were set down to encourage the students to take part.

16. Factors encouraged participation: Structural

17. Reasons inhibited participation: Structural

18. Autonomy Dimension Students will be encouraged to take charge of the environment.

19. Factors encouraged participation: Autonomy

20. Reasons inhibited participation: Autonomy

21. Involvement Dimension Students will feel related and cared within the environment.

22. Factors encouraged participation: Involvment

23. Reasons inhibited participation: Involment

24. Reflection What have I observed from the experience and what does the data tells from the years.

25. Factors that encouraged and inhibited online participation from 2008 to 2010

26. Cycles provided rich data of respondents Revealed attitude and behavioural reasons such as busy and low confidence that prevented them from participating. Study in Autonomy dimension has revealed that some participants who had forgotten their account have participated in the AOD using their friends’ account.

27. Learning Motivation To provide extrinsic with caution, To begin with intrinsic, To boost with intrinsic, To rescue with extrinsic.

28. Inhibiting factors beyond motivation attitude, behaviour, choice, time, content and learning environment. Each of these factors addressed the motivation dimension highlighted by Shroff and Vogel (2009). Marks was only one of the minor reward busy schedule and priority in other courses Students who perceived they will gain benefit from the activity contributed in hope to gain in knowledge and information. Some students who liked to share their knowledge would also participate in the AOD.

29. Participatory Action Research may not be suitable to be adopted in this research context. The justification was PAR put equal responsibilities on both the participants and researcher because they contemplate the students as an expert due to their experience in the context of the study (Khanlou & Peter, 2005). Students as moderators failed Lack of skills and experience although knowledgeable Gained jealous and others remain quiet throughout the activity.

30. Summary marks does not ensure participation on AOD. contributing factor that had encouraged participation was the mainly due to their intrinsic reason of knowing the benefit and value of the task. attitude, behaviour, choice, time, content and learning environment are some inhibiting factors. highlight the benefits and caution factors to students

31. Concluding Action Research Longitudinal study Action learning Case study About us Reflective Passionate

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