The State of Transportation–Maintaining What We Have, Investing in Washington's Future

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Published on January 13, 2009

Author: wsdot

Source: slideshare.net

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Paula Hammond's presentation on the State of Transportation in Washington (The State of Transportation–Maintaining What We Have, Investing in Washington's Future) to the Legislative Transportation Committee on January 2009

The State of Transportation Maintaining What We Have, Investing in Washington’s Future Olympia, Washington January 2009 Paula Hammond, P.E. Secretary of Transportation Washington State Department of Transportation Hon. Chris Gregoire Governor

Paula Hammond, P.E. – 30 Years Secretary of Transportation Washington State Department of Transportation Dave Dye – 30 Years COO,Deputy Secretary Steve Reinmuth – 21 Years Chief of Staff David Mosely – 32 Years Assistant Secretary Washington State Ferries Jerry Lenzi – 40 Years Chief Engineer Engineering & Regional Operations Bill Ford – 26 Years Assistant Secretary Administration Amy Arnis – 20 Years CFO Strategic Planning & Finance 199 Years of Professional Experience

Washington State Department of Transportation Profile WSDOT owns, manages and maintains: 20,000 state highway lane miles (carry 86 million vehicle miles/day) More than 3,000 bridges and structures 22 ferry vessels and 20 terminals (carry 23 million passengers) Partner in Amtrak Cascades state passenger rail (carries over 700,000 passengers/year) Commute programs support more than 810,000 commuters statewide (170 million vehicle miles traveled reduced annually) Vanpool program purchased more than 300 vans (Washington has the largest public vanpool fleet in the nation) 16 general aviation airports Grain Train (runs 89 grain cars) 1,432 miles of short-line rail Total 2007-09 Biennial Budget of $5.83 billion $4.45 billion (07-09) Capital Budget, over 1,000 active projects, currently delivering the largest infrastructure program in the state’s history $1.38 billion (07-09) Operating Budget

Washington State Department

of Transportation Profile

WSDOT owns, manages and maintains:

20,000 state highway lane miles (carry 86 million vehicle miles/day)

More than 3,000 bridges and structures

22 ferry vessels and 20 terminals (carry 23 million passengers)

Partner in Amtrak Cascades state passenger rail (carries over 700,000 passengers/year)

Commute programs support more than 810,000 commuters statewide (170 million vehicle miles traveled reduced annually)

Vanpool program purchased more than 300 vans (Washington has the largest public vanpool fleet in the nation)

16 general aviation airports

Grain Train (runs 89 grain cars)

1,432 miles of short-line rail

Total 2007-09 Biennial Budget of $5.83 billion

$4.45 billion (07-09) Capital Budget, over 1,000 active projects, currently delivering the largest infrastructure program in the state’s history

$1.38 billion (07-09) Operating Budget

Our Vision: The Transportation System of the Future Must Be … Reliable Improved travel times for drivers Better reliability and choices for commuters and increased intercity service More efficient freight movement across state and in and out of our ports Responsible Safer roads, and fewer fatalities and serious injuries Cost effective asset maintenance and preservation Highways, transit and ferries provide users integrated travel options Increased special needs transportation to provide access for jobs and lifeline services Sustainable Cleaner air and water Strategic and balanced approach to climate change Predictable funding and affordable improvements and operations

Reliable

Improved travel times for drivers

Better reliability and choices for commuters and increased intercity service

More efficient freight movement across state and in and out of our ports

Responsible

Safer roads, and fewer fatalities and serious injuries

Cost effective asset maintenance and preservation

Highways, transit and ferries provide users integrated travel options

Increased special needs transportation to provide access for jobs and lifeline services

Sustainable

Cleaner air and water

Strategic and balanced approach to climate change

Predictable funding and affordable improvements and operations

Washington’s Businesses and Jobs Depend on Safe, Reliable and Efficient Transportation Transportation projects yield about 10,000 jobs for every $1B invested Washington’s highways, rail, ferries and transit support jobs and businesses in many sectors of the economy: Retail and wholesale businesses-1 million jobs in 2007 Agriculture -70,000 jobs, mostly in Eastern Washington Tourism-140,000 jobs Manufacturing and aerospace and technology- $100B annual business A talented work force looks for quality of life, including access to goods, services, education, recreation and safe, reliable transportation

Washington’s Businesses and Jobs Depend on Safe, Reliable and Efficient Transportation

Transportation projects yield about 10,000 jobs for every $1B invested

Washington’s highways, rail, ferries and transit support jobs and businesses in many sectors of the economy:

Retail and wholesale businesses-1 million jobs in 2007

Agriculture -70,000 jobs, mostly in Eastern Washington

Tourism-140,000 jobs

Manufacturing and aerospace and technology- $100B annual business

A talented work force looks for quality of life, including access to goods, services, education, recreation and safe, reliable transportation

The Ups and Downs of Transportation The transportation system needs are increasing , and existing funding forecasts are not keeping pace . Inflation is driving up the cost of construction materials. New environmental regulations and engineering standards contribute to higher project costs. Integrated transportation solutions need to reflect the values of our communities , and meet the needs of our state. One size does not fit all, the state’s unique transportation problems require unique solutions . We must balance investments by adding capacity, managing demand, utilizing technology and increasing efficiency.

The transportation system needs are increasing , and existing funding forecasts are not keeping pace .

Inflation is driving up the cost of construction materials.

New environmental regulations and engineering standards contribute to higher project costs.

Integrated transportation solutions need to reflect the values of our communities , and meet the needs of our state.

One size does not fit all, the state’s unique transportation problems require unique solutions .

We must balance investments by adding capacity, managing demand, utilizing technology and increasing efficiency.

WSDOT Depends on Many Fund Sources (2007-09) 70% of transportation funding is generated through gas tax * State Gas tax reflects the net amount after distributions to cities and counties, refunds, and debt service have been made. State Gas Tax*, 19% Federal Funds (Gas Tax), 21% Bond Sales, 30% Licenses, Permits and Fees, 11% Ferry Fares, 5% Other, 12% NOTE: Based on the June 2008 Transportation Revenue Forecast Non-Gas Tax Bonds, 2% 2% 144.5 Non-Gas Tax Bonds 100% $5,827.4 Total 12% 678.8 Other 5% 302 Ferry Fares 11% 612.8 Licenses, Permits and Fees 30% 1,763.1 Bond Sales 21% 1,210.9 Federal Funds (Gas Tax) 19% $1,115.5 State Gas Tax*

Driving Behaviors Change With the Price of Fuel

Since 2003 Inflation Skyrocketed

Gas Tax Revenues are Losing Steam Growth Rates Compared: Gas Tax Revenue, and Gas Tax Rate in 1991 dollars Data Source: Based on the November 2008 Transportation Revenue Forecast

Highway Construction Program, All Funds, with Workforce Projection 2009 Governor Proposed Budget - January 2009 Includes Preservation and Improvement Programs with two exceptions Excludes expenditures for the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and expenditures in the Improvement Program reimbursed by Sound Transit $12 million in strategic-reduction savings for administration in 09-11 Additional strategic-reduction savings in highway projects for 09-11 Agency wide organizational review savings

$12 million in strategic-reduction savings for administration in 09-11

Additional strategic-reduction savings in highway projects for 09-11

Agency wide organizational review savings

How are We Performing? Transportation is vital to our economy The system is working, but it is stressed by increasing demands, and it needs maintenance and rehabilitation The Nickel and TPA projects are making a difference, but alone will not meet future needs for people and freight movement Safety is improving, but how safe is “enough”- we can do more to reduce fatal and disabling accidents Future investments must integrate highways, transit, ferries and non-motorized travel, and focus on managing demand, getting the most performance from our past investments, and strategically adding capacity

Transportation is vital to our economy

The system is working, but it is stressed by increasing demands, and it needs maintenance and rehabilitation

The Nickel and TPA projects are making a difference, but alone will not meet future needs for people and freight movement

Safety is improving, but how safe is “enough”- we can do more to reduce fatal and disabling accidents

Future investments must integrate highways, transit, ferries and non-motorized travel, and focus on managing demand, getting the most performance from our past investments, and strategically adding capacity

Highway Maintenance Program Performance: Proactively maintain our system to prolong life and respond to emerging needs To maintain and/or operate… • 20,173 lane miles of highway • 25,000 miles of stripe • 75,000 roadside acres • 42 rest areas • More than 3,000 bridges and structures • 50,000 culverts • 1,100 traffic signals • 149,000 signs Requires: 1,250 highly trained field maintenance employees Approximately 4,000 pieces of equipment Approximately $60 million per biennium to rent, operate and maintain our fleet 121 maintenance facilities • Various materials (biennial use) 150,000 tons of de-icer 800,000 gallons of paint $13.6 million in utility bills Ongoing Program Challenges Added infrastructure from gas tax projects to maintain and operate Inflationary cost increases erode program buying power Additional environmental requirements and related cost increases Backlog of essential maintenance has continued to grow

To maintain and/or operate…

• 20,173 lane miles of highway

• 25,000 miles of stripe

• 75,000 roadside acres

• 42 rest areas

• More than 3,000 bridges and structures

• 50,000 culverts

• 1,100 traffic signals

• 149,000 signs

Requires:

1,250 highly trained field maintenance employees

Approximately 4,000 pieces of equipment

Approximately $60 million per biennium to rent, operate and maintain our fleet 121 maintenance facilities

• Various materials (biennial use)

150,000 tons of de-icer

800,000 gallons of paint

$13.6 million in utility bills

Ongoing Program Challenges

Added infrastructure from gas tax projects to maintain and operate

Inflationary cost increases erode program buying power

Additional environmental requirements and related cost increases

Backlog of essential maintenance has continued to grow

2009-11 MAP Level of Service Projections Identification of maintenance backlog and related costs will guide future program investment. Next steps are: Determine reactive and preventive maintenance requirement for all activities. Develop feature inventory information Refine maintenance cost information. Determine type of maintenance management system required to track information. Use this information to base future funding requests to catch up and keep up with maintenance backlog. Stormwater permit requirements for catch basin and detention basin maintenance are significant, estimated to cost an additional $12.7 million in 2009 -11. WSDOT and Ecology are exploring compliance timeline options in light of limitations in the availability of funds.

Identification of maintenance backlog and related costs will guide future program investment. Next steps are:

Determine reactive and preventive maintenance requirement for all activities.

Develop feature inventory information

Refine maintenance cost information.

Determine type of maintenance management system required to track information.

Use this information to base future funding requests to catch up and keep up with maintenance backlog.

Stormwater permit requirements for catch basin and detention basin maintenance are significant, estimated to cost an additional $12.7 million in 2009 -11. WSDOT and Ecology are exploring compliance timeline options in light of limitations in the availability of funds.

Highway Preservation Performance: 2007 Pavement Condition State pavements: 18,373 lane miles - 93% in fair or better condition County pavements: 10,394 lane miles - 93% in fair or better condition* City pavements: 3,175 lane miles - 78% in fair or better condition* Concrete Challenges: Washington’s concrete pavement is old and needs to be replaced. Concrete accounts for 13% of the state’s total lane miles and supports 27.8% of vehicle miles traveled. Though it was originally designed for a 20-year life, most of Washington’s concrete pavement is over 30 years old. An estimated 400 lane miles should be replaced in the next 20 years ($2.5 million per lane mile), while another 1,000 lane miles should be dowel bar retrofitted in the next 12 years ($600,000 per lane mile). 37 lane miles are funded to be rehabilitated by the end of the current biennium, while $61 million is planned to be invested in retrofitting and replacing pavement panels in 2009-11. * WSDOT does not analyze or interpret city/county pavement data. Data collection systems vary which may skew results, and indices used between municipalities may not be consistent

State pavements: 18,373 lane miles - 93% in fair or better condition

County pavements: 10,394 lane miles - 93% in fair or better condition*

City pavements: 3,175 lane miles - 78% in fair or better condition*

Concrete Challenges: Washington’s concrete pavement is old and needs to be replaced.

Concrete accounts for 13% of the state’s total lane miles and supports 27.8% of vehicle miles traveled.

Though it was originally designed for a 20-year life, most of Washington’s concrete pavement is over 30 years old.

An estimated 400 lane miles should be replaced in the next 20 years ($2.5 million per lane mile), while another 1,000 lane miles should be dowel bar retrofitted in the next 12 years ($600,000 per lane mile).

37 lane miles are funded to be rehabilitated by the end of the current biennium, while $61 million is planned to be invested in retrofitting and replacing pavement panels in 2009-11.

The 2003 and 2005 programs did not contain funding for black pavement 1 preservation. Paving projects in Governor’s 2009-2011 budget request 1,635 centerline miles Remaining paving needs 539 centerline miles Highway Preservation Performance: Black Pavement Challenges Increased preservation needs in 2009-2011 1 Black pavement is hot mix asphalt and chip seal

Bridge Preservation Performance: 2007 Bridge Conditions Challenges: More than half of Washington’s bridges were built between 1956 and 1976, the peak of the interstate highway program. Bridges are generally designed for a life-expectancy of 75 years. The average age of state and local bridges is about 40 years. Seismic: Assuring our bridges’ resiliency in the event of an earthquake is key to citizens’ safety and a strong economy: FEMA ranked Washington as the 2nd highest risk for economic loss in the nation due to earthquakes. Retrofit costs have escalated due to enhanced criteria established by FHWA and AASHTO in 2008.  Bridge Painting: Applying protective paint to steel prevents corrosion, which reduces a bridge’s capacity to carry truck loads. Five of the seven border bridges will require repainting over the next 10 years at an estimated cost of $90 million. Scour Mitigation: Scour, the eroding of stream bed material beneath bridge foundations, is the leading cause of bridges collapsing in both Washington and the nation. 50 bridges should be retrofitted in the next six years, but only six can be addressed per biennium due to the costs and timelines associated with the retrofits. *City and County Bridges Under 20 ft - 1,000, Full condition assessments are not available, replacement of these structures is not eligible from the Federal Bridge Replacement Program State Bridges: 3,607 bridges – 97% in fair or better condition County Bridges: 3,201 bridges - 96% in fair or better condition * City Bridges: 652 bridges - 93% in fair or better condition *

Challenges: More than half of Washington’s bridges were built between 1956 and 1976, the peak of the interstate highway program. Bridges are generally designed for a life-expectancy of 75 years. The average age of state and local bridges is about 40 years.

Seismic: Assuring our bridges’ resiliency in the event of an earthquake is key to citizens’ safety and a strong economy: FEMA ranked Washington as the 2nd highest risk for economic loss in the nation due to earthquakes. Retrofit costs have escalated due to enhanced criteria established by FHWA and AASHTO in 2008. 

Bridge Painting: Applying protective paint to steel prevents corrosion, which reduces a bridge’s capacity to carry truck loads. Five of the seven border bridges will require repainting over the next 10 years at an estimated cost of $90 million.

Scour Mitigation: Scour, the eroding of stream bed material beneath bridge foundations, is the leading cause of bridges collapsing in both Washington and the nation. 50 bridges should be retrofitted in the next six years, but only six can be addressed per biennium due to the costs and timelines associated with the retrofits.

Ferries Preservation Performance: WSF carries more than 23 million riders annually. WSF currently has a draft long-range plan (2008-2030) with two options, out for public review and comment. Option A: Current level of service remains  with operational strategies implemented over time and several new vessels  coming online. The State will continue in its current role as owner, operator, and supply principal funding of ferry services. Option B: The State takes responsibility for the core marine highway system and a locally-funded entity or entities would take responsibility for a new marine transit system or passenger-only ferry service. Assumes WSF would implement operational strategies over time. Investments over the 22-year horizon: Terminals 1 : Option A $1.932 billion; Option B $1.845  billion (for both options, the amount   includes $1.412 billion in preservation  work) Vessels 2 : Option A $3.43 billion ($1.543 billion of  which is preservation work); Option B $2.064 billion ($1.223 billion is  preservation work) Challenges: WSF's fleet is among the oldest of any major ferry operator, with four vessels recently retired on an emergency basis and eight additional vessels to be retired over the next 22 years. Many of the current terminal facilities were built in the 1940s and 50s and have had few improvements beyond basic maintenance and preservation since they were constructed. 1 Admin and program costs in support of this work amount to $174.8 million 2 Admin and program costs in support of this work amount to $245.2 million

WSF carries more than 23 million riders annually.

WSF currently has a draft long-range plan (2008-2030) with two options, out for public review and comment.

Option A: Current level of service remains  with operational strategies implemented over time and several new vessels  coming online. The State will continue in its current role as owner, operator, and supply principal funding of ferry services.

Option B: The State takes responsibility for the core marine highway system and a locally-funded entity or entities would take responsibility for a new marine transit system or passenger-only ferry service. Assumes WSF would implement operational strategies over time.

Investments over the 22-year horizon:

Terminals 1 : Option A $1.932 billion; Option B $1.845  billion (for both options, the amount   includes $1.412 billion in preservation  work)

Vessels 2 : Option A $3.43 billion ($1.543 billion of  which is preservation work); Option B $2.064 billion ($1.223 billion is  preservation work)

Challenges: WSF's fleet is among the oldest of any major ferry operator, with four vessels recently retired on an emergency basis and eight additional vessels to be retired over the next 22 years. Many of the current terminal facilities were built in the 1940s and 50s and have had few improvements beyond basic maintenance and preservation since they were constructed.

1 Admin and program costs in support of this work amount to $174.8 million

2 Admin and program costs in support of this work amount to $245.2 million

Safety Performance: We’re making progress toward our goal of “Target Zero” In 2007, fatalities on state highways decreased 10.6% from 2006 , and met the national target of 1.00 fatality per 100 million vehicle miles travelled. These reductions are due in part to: New state laws, including making seat belts a primary enforcement law, tougher impaired-driving laws, increased law enforcement (including speed and DUI patrols.) WSDOT has delivered 115 of 152 safety improvement projects worth $692 million from the 2003 and 2005 revenue packages. Low cost safety improvements, such as rumble strips, cable median barriers, and intersection improvements have proven effective solutions. Traffic fatality rates in Washington compared to the national average Fatalities per 100 million VMT: 1980-2007 Provided by: WSDOT Transportation Data Office (TDO). Data Sources: U.S. Fatalities/VMT: NHTSA Traffic Safety Facts; WA Fatalities: FARS; State Highway Fatalities: WSDOT-TDO; WA VMT: WSDOT-TDO.

In 2007, fatalities on state highways decreased 10.6% from 2006 , and met the national target of 1.00 fatality per 100 million vehicle miles travelled. These reductions are due in part to:

New state laws, including making seat belts a primary enforcement law, tougher impaired-driving laws, increased law enforcement (including speed and DUI patrols.)

WSDOT has delivered 115 of 152 safety improvement projects worth $692 million from the 2003 and 2005 revenue packages.

Low cost safety improvements, such as rumble strips, cable median barriers, and intersection improvements have proven effective solutions.

Traffic fatality rates in Washington compared to the national average

Fatalities per 100 million VMT: 1980-2007

Mobility Performance: Moving People, Goods and Services State Highways While most statewide roadways do not experience routine, capacity induced (recurring) congestion, key routes in primarily urban areas present challenges for mobility. Travel Times: Statewide, there has been a 3% increase in delays between 2005 and 2007 Average travel times improved (from 1 to 2 minutes) or stayed the same on 24 of 52 tracked Puget Sound commutes in 2007 compared to 2005, and increased on 28 (from 1 to 4 minutes). In the first half of 2008, preliminary data shows average travel times improved (from 1 to 4 minutes) or remained the same for 6 of 7 sample Puget Sound commutes when compared to the same period of 2007. Transit Boardings: in the central Puget Sound increased between 2005 and 2007 Weekday boardings on Sounder train routes increased 76%, Sound Transit bus ridership increased 26%, King County Metro ridership increased 12% Vanpools: Washington has the nation’s largest program, with 2,701 vanpools operating (as of August 2008), an increase of 18% compared to 2,291 vanpools in August 2007. Challenges: Demand on the System Continues to Increase Washington’s growth, reflected in more families, jobs and trade, is increasing the volume of traffic and associated travel demand on state highways and will continue to stretch the capacity of our transportation infrastructure. High gas prices earlier in 2008 increased demand for commuting options, carpool, vanpool and public transportation boosting the need for additional vehicles and service expansions

State Highways

While most statewide roadways do not experience routine, capacity induced (recurring) congestion, key routes in primarily urban areas present challenges for mobility.

Travel Times: Statewide, there has been a 3% increase in delays between 2005 and 2007

Average travel times improved (from 1 to 2 minutes) or stayed the same on 24 of 52 tracked Puget Sound commutes in 2007 compared to 2005, and increased on 28 (from 1 to 4 minutes).

In the first half of 2008, preliminary data shows average travel times improved (from 1 to 4 minutes) or remained the same for 6 of 7 sample Puget Sound commutes when compared to the same period of 2007.

Transit Boardings: in the central Puget Sound increased between 2005 and 2007

Weekday boardings on Sounder train routes increased 76%, Sound Transit bus ridership increased 26%, King County Metro ridership increased 12%

Vanpools: Washington has the nation’s largest program, with 2,701 vanpools operating (as of August 2008), an increase of 18% compared to 2,291 vanpools in August 2007.

Challenges: Demand on the System Continues to Increase

Washington’s growth, reflected in more families, jobs and trade, is increasing the volume of traffic and associated travel demand on state highways and will continue to stretch the capacity of our transportation infrastructure.

High gas prices earlier in 2008 increased demand for commuting options, carpool, vanpool and public transportation boosting the need for additional vehicles and service expansions

Mobility Performance: Ferries and Amtrak Cascades State Ferries Ridership: 23 million passengers in FY08. Our ability to predict the impact of population and economic growth on the demands of the ferry system is limited. On-Time Performance: Over the past five years, on-time trip departures have consistently averaged about 92% (ranging from 86% to 95% by quarter and season). Challenges: Ferries carries a large number of tourist passengers annually and a decline in discretionary travel is contributing to a reduction in ridership. Passenger Rail Amtrak Cascades Ridership: Ridership on state-supported routes exceeded 457,000 in FY07 (a 7% increase from 2006). Ridership is up 16% in the third quarter of 2008 over the same period in 2007. On-Time Performance: Amtrak Cascades’ on-time performance target is 80%. On-time performance increased from 60% for all of 2007 to 79% through November in 2008. The November 2008 on-time performance of 82% was the best ever. Challenges: Trains can be delayed for a number of reasons, including freight train interference due to limited rail line capacity (the main cause of delay), landslides, slower train speeds through railroad construction areas, delays at the international border crossing with Canada and mechanical equipment problems.

State Ferries

Ridership: 23 million passengers in FY08. Our ability to predict the impact of population and economic growth on the demands of the ferry system is limited.

On-Time Performance: Over the past five years, on-time trip departures have consistently averaged about 92% (ranging from 86% to 95% by quarter and season).

Challenges: Ferries carries a large number of tourist passengers annually and a decline in discretionary travel is contributing to a reduction in ridership.

Passenger Rail Amtrak Cascades

Ridership: Ridership on state-supported routes exceeded 457,000 in FY07 (a 7% increase from 2006). Ridership is up 16% in the third quarter of 2008 over the same period in 2007.

On-Time Performance: Amtrak Cascades’ on-time performance target is 80%. On-time performance increased from 60% for all of 2007 to 79% through November in 2008. The November 2008 on-time performance of 82% was the best ever.

Challenges: Trains can be delayed for a number of reasons, including freight train interference due to limited rail line capacity (the main cause of delay), landslides, slower train speeds through railroad construction areas, delays at the international border crossing with Canada and mechanical equipment problems.

Mobility Performance: Freight Systems Truck volumes on Washington highways show steady increases, as much as 14% on some key routes between 2005 and 2006. Challenges: Freight systems support our state and national economy, international trade, and deliver goods to our citizens. Freight deficiencies reduce Washington’s economy and job base: Bottlenecks on the state’s major truck corridors Eastern Washington lacks year-round access to markets Columbia-Snake River waterway lacks funded strategic maintenance Rail system reaching capacity Port Access Improvement Program Rail: Vancouver Bypass, Tacoma Rail and PS&P, Kelso to Martin's Bluff Connectors such as Highway 509/I-5 interchange, Highway 167 connection to I-5, S. Spokane St., E. Marginal Way and Lincoln Ave. grade separations Preserve Maritime Capacity Columbia-Snake River system and coastal port channel improvements

Challenges: Freight systems support our state and national economy, international trade, and deliver goods to our citizens. Freight deficiencies reduce Washington’s economy and job base:

Bottlenecks on the state’s major truck corridors

Eastern Washington lacks year-round access to markets

Columbia-Snake River waterway lacks funded strategic maintenance

Rail system reaching capacity

Port Access Improvement Program

Rail: Vancouver Bypass, Tacoma Rail and PS&P, Kelso to Martin's Bluff

Connectors such as Highway 509/I-5 interchange, Highway 167 connection to I-5, S. Spokane St., E. Marginal Way and Lincoln Ave. grade separations

Preserve Maritime Capacity

Columbia-Snake River system and coastal port channel improvements

2006 Average Mainline Train Counts and Capacities; HDR. By 2012, the Rail System in Washington will Reach its Capacity Limits

Here are the Results: WSDOT continues to deliver projects and programs that reduce congestion and make our roadways safer As of 11/30/08, we’ve delivered 182 projects funded by the 2003 and 2005 gas tax transportation funding programs, valued at $1.9 billion. WSDOT is delivering projects on time and on budget: 90% of the completed projects were delivered on-time, 88% were on-budget 60 projects valued at $3 billion are in the construction phase 40 more projects valued at $1.5 billion will be under construction in six months Nine rail projects—valued at $31 million—have all been delivered on time and on budget These projects are improving conditions for Washington drivers: A sample review of 21 projects showed a 10% improvement in travel times, saving drivers 6,400 hours of travel a day. 49 safety projects have reduced collisions by 6% and fatal collisions by 14%.

As of 11/30/08, we’ve delivered 182 projects funded by the 2003 and 2005 gas tax transportation funding programs, valued at $1.9 billion.

WSDOT is delivering projects on time and on budget:

90% of the completed projects were delivered on-time, 88% were on-budget

60 projects valued at $3 billion are in the construction phase

40 more projects valued at $1.5 billion will be under construction in six months

Nine rail projects—valued at $31 million—have all been delivered on time and on budget

These projects are improving conditions for Washington drivers:

A sample review of 21 projects showed a 10% improvement in travel times, saving drivers 6,400 hours of travel a day.

49 safety projects have reduced collisions by 6% and fatal collisions by 14%.

Results: Providing Options for Washington Commuters Overall, commute programs support more than 810,000 commuters statewide resulting in a reduction of 170 million vehicle miles traveled annually. Daily ridership in vanpools has increased from 12,900 in 2003 to 22,900 as of December 2008. Other Improvements Traffic Operations such as signal retiming, ramp meters, and incident response are also improving safety and reducing congestion. For example: A signal retiming project on SR 522 decreased the average travel time of the afternoon peak by over 2 minutes, and as much as 3.5 minutes between 4 -5 pm. Low Cost Safety Enhancements Rumble strips, cable median barriers, and intersection improvements have proven to be effective solutions. Cable median barriers reduced serious injury and fatal collisions by 62% (24.8/year to 9.5/year after installation) on 177 miles of Washington highways. A preliminary analysis of centerline rumble strips shows a 28% reduction in fatal and serious injury collisions after installation

Providing Options for Washington Commuters

Overall, commute programs support more than 810,000 commuters statewide resulting in a reduction of 170 million vehicle miles traveled annually.

Daily ridership in vanpools has increased from 12,900 in 2003 to 22,900 as of December 2008.

Other Improvements

Traffic Operations such as signal retiming, ramp meters, and incident response are also improving safety and reducing congestion.

For example: A signal retiming project on SR 522 decreased the average travel time of the afternoon peak by over 2 minutes, and as much as 3.5 minutes between 4 -5 pm.

Low Cost Safety Enhancements

Rumble strips, cable median barriers, and intersection improvements have proven to be effective solutions.

Cable median barriers reduced serious injury and fatal collisions by 62% (24.8/year to 9.5/year after installation) on 177 miles of Washington highways.

A preliminary analysis of centerline rumble strips shows a 28% reduction in fatal and serious injury collisions after installation

Improving the performance of our state’s transportation corridors by Moving Washington Adding Capacity Strategically Adding new capacity to our currently over-stressed transportation system. TM Operating Roadways Efficiently Improve the system’s performance to maximize existing investments and system capacity using traffic management tools. TM Managing Demand Providing more travel choices and options for people and freight to improve system efficiencies. TM

Moving Washington Strategies with a 21 st Century Pay-off Moving Washington has the potential to: Improve travel times on urban corridors by 10% Reduce collisions by 25% Improve Trip Reliability by 10% Reduce green House Gas emissions from transportation by smoothing traffic flow and supporting integrated transportation planning and land development decisions that can reduce unnecessary travel and VMT TM

Moving Washington has the potential to:

Improve travel times on urban corridors by 10%

Reduce collisions by 25%

Improve Trip Reliability by 10%

Reduce green House Gas emissions from transportation by smoothing traffic flow and supporting integrated transportation planning and land development decisions that can reduce unnecessary travel and VMT

TPA Completing critical bridges SR 520 across Lake Washington • Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle • Columbia River Crossing in Vancouver Completing corridor gaps I-405 in east King County • SR 167 in King and Pierce counties • US 395 North Spokane Corridor • I-90 across Snoqualmie Pass • SR 509 Sea-Tac Airport South Access Reducing bottlenecks I-5/SR 18 flyover ramp in Federal Way SR 167 HOT Lanes extension to SR 410 Additional lanes on I-205 in Vancouver Add lanes to I-5 in the Centralia vicinity New interchange at the junction of US 12 and SR 124 Partner with local, regional and special needs transit providers to expand and coordinate public transportation systems Adding Capacity Strategically … builds on current efforts and adds the next critical parts of the solution TM I-5 Everett HOV US 12 Walla Walla I-405 Kirkland US 395 North Spokane 520 Bridge Replacement Columbia River Crossing

Completing critical bridges

SR 520 across Lake Washington

• Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle

• Columbia River Crossing in Vancouver

Completing corridor gaps

I-405 in east King County

• SR 167 in King and Pierce counties

• US 395 North Spokane Corridor

• I-90 across Snoqualmie Pass

• SR 509 Sea-Tac Airport South Access

Reducing bottlenecks

I-5/SR 18 flyover ramp in Federal Way

SR 167 HOT Lanes extension to SR 410

Additional lanes on I-205 in Vancouver

Add lanes to I-5 in the Centralia vicinity

New interchange at the junction of US 12 and SR 124

Partner with local, regional and special needs transit providers to expand and coordinate public transportation systems

Operating Efficiently … improves the performance of our system Advanced Technologies Incident Response Team Traffic Management Center Providing real-time traveler information Let people know travel times and traffic conditions before and during their trips – on-line, 511, instant messages Actively manage traffic Manage flow on freeways using ramp metering, and other active traffic management strategies Using Incident Response Teams (IRT) Clear disabled vehicles and accident scenes more quickly to reduce traffic back-ups Re-timing traffic signals Coordinate and adjust signal timing to improve traffic flow Implementing express lanes Provide options for improved and more reliable travel times using High Occupancy Toll (HOT)/Express Lanes Appling advanced technologies Pilot innovative technology to keep traffic moving smoothly and significantly reducing accidents SR 167 HOT lanes Express Lanes TM

Providing real-time traveler information

Let people know travel times and traffic conditions before and during their trips – on-line, 511, instant messages

Actively manage traffic

Manage flow on freeways using ramp metering, and other active traffic management strategies

Using Incident Response Teams (IRT)

Clear disabled vehicles and accident scenes more quickly to reduce traffic back-ups

Re-timing traffic signals

Coordinate and adjust signal timing to improve traffic flow

Implementing express lanes

Provide options for improved and more reliable travel times using High Occupancy Toll (HOT)/Express Lanes

Appling advanced technologies

Pilot innovative technology to keep traffic moving smoothly and significantly reducing accidents

Managing Demand … provides more people with more choices Working with local and regional transit providers Improve coordination between highway, ferry, rail and transit improvements and services Expand local and regional bus and vanpool service Working with local and regional jurisdictions Expand park and ride lots, add bike lanes and improve pedestrian access To carefully integrate land use and transportation planning Leading demand management programs Commute trip reduction programs Construction management ReInvent Your Commute Partnership TM

Working with local and regional transit providers

Improve coordination between highway, ferry, rail and transit improvements and services

Expand local and regional bus and vanpool service

Working with local and regional jurisdictions

Expand park and ride lots, add bike lanes and improve pedestrian access

To carefully integrate land use and transportation planning

Leading demand management programs

Commute trip reduction programs

Construction management

ReInvent Your Commute Partnership

Conclusion: We Need to Continue to Invest in Our Transportation Infrastructure Transportation is vital to our economy The system is working, but it is stressed by increasing demands, and it needs maintenance and rehabilitation The Nickel and TPA projects are making a difference, but alone will not meet future needs for people and freight movement Safety is improving, but how safe is “enough”- we can do more to reduce fatal and disabling accidents Future investments must integrate highways, transit, ferries and non-motorized travel, and focus on managing demand, getting the most performance from our past investments, and strategically adding capacity

Transportation is vital to our economy

The system is working, but it is stressed by increasing demands, and it needs maintenance and rehabilitation

The Nickel and TPA projects are making a difference, but alone will not meet future needs for people and freight movement

Safety is improving, but how safe is “enough”- we can do more to reduce fatal and disabling accidents

Future investments must integrate highways, transit, ferries and non-motorized travel, and focus on managing demand, getting the most performance from our past investments, and strategically adding capacity

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