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The Perseids2008

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Information about The Perseids2008

Published on August 11, 2008

Author: askyfullofstars

Source: slideshare.net

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Though spectacular-looking as intense streaks of light shooting across a darkened sky, meteors are really little more than tiny bits of interplanetary dust and debris, or meteoroids , burning up as they collide with the Earth’s atmosphere. With meteor showers, our planet is passing through an entire stream of debris, often times left by passing comets and asteroids as they orbit the sun.

Depending upon the size and trajectory of a particular debris stream, as well as our own planet’s orbit, the journey through can last anywhere from a couple of days to several weeks, producing sporadic meteors at each end of the trip, and peak nights of many meteors, or storms, as we pass through the thickest regions of the stream. Comets’ debris trails can extend many millions of miles and remain prevalent for many hundreds of years. Each time that a comet passes, that stream becomes thickened with new debris to temporarily produce more prolific showers, but not necessarily in the years immediately following. Again, it all depends upon the respective orbits of the comet and our planet. For instance, with the Perseids, our planet currently passes through a general debris field estimated at one-thousand years old; but in 2028, we’ll pass directly through thicker debris left in 1492, thus more prolific showers are predicted for that year.

Depending upon the size and trajectory of a particular debris stream, as well as

our own planet’s orbit, the journey through can last anywhere from a couple of

days to several weeks, producing sporadic meteors at each end of the trip, and

peak nights of many meteors, or storms, as we pass through the thickest regions

of the stream.

Comets’ debris trails can extend many millions of miles and remain prevalent

for many hundreds of years. Each time that a comet passes, that stream becomes

thickened with new debris to temporarily produce more prolific showers, but

not necessarily in the years immediately following.

Again, it all depends upon the respective orbits of the comet and our planet.

For instance, with the Perseids, our planet currently passes through a

general debris field estimated at one-thousand years old; but in 2028, we’ll

pass directly through thicker debris left in 1492, thus more prolific showers

are predicted for that year.

The Perseids , the first shower positively identified with a comet, are associated with comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle . This comet is a periodic comet of 129 years and its debris field is known as the Perseus Cloud. Swift-Tuttle last passed our planet in 1992, producing peak rates of 200-500 streaks in 1993 and 2004. We’ll next see this comet pass our way in 2121 and likely experience better showers in the year or two following. Comet Swift-Tuttle 1992

The Perseids , the first shower positively identified with a comet, are

associated with comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle . This comet is a periodic comet of

129 years and its debris field is known as the Perseus Cloud. Swift-Tuttle

last passed our planet in 1992, producing peak rates of 200-500 streaks in

1993 and 2004. We’ll next see this comet pass our way in 2121 and likely

experience better showers in the year or two following.

Comet Swift-Tuttle 1992

Because meteor showers have been observed since long before their Relationship to comets was known, meteor showers are named for the constellation from which they appear to originate. Their specific origin point, from within the constellation itself, is known as the “radiant.“ Knowing a meteor’s radiant is important to providing accurate counts of a particular shower. For example, not every meteor you see this month will be a Perseids. Not only is our planet nearly always passing through one debris Trail or another, resulting in several showers each month, but we also Regularly encounter random bits of interplanetary debris. The Perseids’ radiant is complex, with the two most prolific origin points appearing to be from around Eta Persei and the famous Double Cluster, NGC 869 and NGC 884.

Because meteor showers have been observed since long before their

Relationship to comets was known, meteor showers are named for the

constellation from which they appear to originate. Their specific origin point,

from within the constellation itself, is known as the “radiant.“

Knowing a meteor’s radiant is important to providing accurate counts of a

particular shower. For example, not every meteor you see this month will be

a Perseids. Not only is our planet nearly always passing through one debris

Trail or another, resulting in several showers each month, but we also

Regularly encounter random bits of interplanetary debris.

The Perseids’ radiant is complex, with the two most prolific origin points

appearing to be from around Eta Persei and the famous Double Cluster,

NGC 869 and NGC 884.

 

The Double Cluster in Perseids – NGC 869 and NGC 884 one of two primary radiants of the Perseids Meteor Shower

The Double Cluster in Perseids – NGC 869 and NGC 884

one of two primary radiants of the Perseids Meteor Shower

The Perseids’ duration, that time when our planet is passing through Comet Swift-Tuttle’s stream, is from July 23 through August 22, with this year’s peak, or maximum, predicted to occur on August 12 from 1130 UTC through 1400 UTC. Typically, the Perseids produces fifty to eighty streaks per hour on peak night, but there have been some surprise years with hourly peak rates as high as 200. This year’s maximum hourly rate is predicted to be 100. The best time to observe the Perseids is in the hours before dawn, after the moon has set. You’ll find the constellation Perseus high on your NNE horizon, just east of the Pleiades star cluster.

The Perseids’ duration, that time when our planet is passing through

Comet Swift-Tuttle’s stream, is from July 23 through August 22, with

this year’s peak, or maximum, predicted to occur on August 12 from

1130 UTC through 1400 UTC. Typically, the Perseids produces fifty to

eighty streaks per hour on peak night, but there have been some

surprise years with hourly peak rates as high as 200. This year’s

maximum hourly rate is predicted to be 100.

The best time to observe the Perseids is in the hours before dawn,

after the moon has set. You’ll find the constellation Perseus high on

your NNE horizon, just east of the Pleiades star cluster.

 

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