The Paragraph

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Information about The Paragraph
Education

Published on March 4, 2014

Author: allofyeah

Source: slideshare.net

Description

This SlideShare describes the elements of the paragraph.

The Paragraph Topic Sentence, Supporting Details, and Closing Sentence

What is a paragraph? A paragraph is a series of sentences developing 1 topic

The paragraph A topic sentence Supporting details Closing or transition sentence

We don’t want a paragraph that looks like this...

or this...

It should have: A topic sentence Supporting details Closing or transition sentence

indent Through the centuries, rats have managed to survive our efforts to destroy them. Rats are very resilient. It is really difficult to get rid of them. Some of them even survived the atomic bomb tests Entwetok Atoll in the Pacific after World War II. In addition to nuclear testing, they have been poisoned and trapped. They have been fumigated, drowned, and burned. In spite of all of our efforts, the rats continue to do well.

Topic Sentence Through the centuries, rats have managed to survive our efforts to destroy them. Rats are very resilient. It is really difficult to get rid of them. Some of them even survived the atomic bomb tests Entwetok Atoll in the Pacific after World War II. In addition to nuclear testing, they have been poisoned and trapped. They have been fumigated, drowned, and burned. In spite of all of our efforts, the rats continue to do well. Conclusion Supporting Details

New Idea = New Paragraph

Topic Sentence This is the controlling idea of the sentence

Topic Sentence = topic + controlling idea

Topic = The subject of your paragraph. It is what you are writing about. It is usually a noun or a noun phrase.

What is the topic of this presentation? NO! Paragraphs Hamburgers!

Underline the topic: 1. Bread is an important part of our everyday food. 2. Potatoes are good for you. 3. The hamburger is a popular food in the United States. 4. People all around the world drink tea. 5. Bread is the poor man’s food.

Find the Topic Let’s talk about rice… Rice plays an important part in some ceremonies. Rice is a nutritious part of our diet. White rice is not healthy for you.

Controlling Idea The controlling idea limits or controls your topic to one aspect, or thing, you want to write about.

topic + controlling idea topic = rice What we say about rice will change based on our controlling idea.

Where are the controlling ideas? Rice plays an important part in some ceremonies. Rice is a nutritious part of our diet. White rice is not healthy for you.

Underline the controlling idea: 1. Bread is an important part of our diet. 2. Bread plays an important role in our region. 3. Potatoes are easy to grow. 4. Potatoes are a staple food in Ireland. 5. French fries are popular all over the world.

Good Topic Sentences Fact vs. Opinion

Good Topic Sentences Good topic sentences are often opinions. A fact is not a good topic sentence because there is nothing more you can say about it.

Fact or Opinion? In some countries, people eat too much rice. Opinion

Fact or Opinion? Rice is a cereal. Fact

Fact or Opinion? Potatoes are good for you. Opinion

Fact or Opinion? The potato is a vegetable. Fact

Fact or Opinion? Alliya is the best teacher in the world. Just Kidding Opinion Fact

Good Topic Sentences Dividing into Parts

Good Topic Sentences Another topic sentence divides the topic into parts.

Good Topic Sentences Potatoes are good for you in three ways. There are 4 basic methods of eating French fries. Potato eaters fall into different groups.

Dividing the Topic If you use this type of topic sentence, your paragraph should explain the parts. For example…

Dividing the Topic Potatoes are good for you in three ways. Supporting Details = 3 ways potatoes are good for you

Dividing the Topic Potatoes are good for you in three ways. Supporting Details = 3 ways potatoes are good for you

Supporting Details Tell more about the topic sentence. Facts Description Examples Explanation

Start General (Topic Sentence) Then add specific details. Facts Description Examples Explanation

I like American food. Then add specific details. I like to eat steak. I like to eat French Fries. I like to eat apple pie.

Add adjectives To make it more interesting I like to eat thick, juicy steak. I like to eat cripsy French Fries on the side. After dinner, I like to eat delicious apple pie.

Add explanations To make it more reflective I like to eat thick, juicy steak because we don’t eat a lot of beef in my country.

All supporting details support the topic sentence. Ex na la p D s e on ti ip cr Fact n tio Example Topic Sentence

Choose the sentence that doesn’t belong Ex na la p D s e on ti ip cr Fact n tio Example Topic Sentence

(1) To control a nosebleed, sit down and lean forward. (2) Put pressure on the lower part of the side that is bleeding for about five minutes. (3) Consult a doctor if the bleeding does not stop within 15 minutes. (4) It’s sometimes difficult to see a doctor without an appointment.

1) Your attitude about your job may affect your chances of becoming sick. (2) A cold and a viral infection are common illnesses. (3) A university study indicated that employees with good attitudes were sick less often. (4) On the other hand, those that were unhappy used their sick days.

(1) Carpentry is rewarding in many ways (2) Working with wood can be relaxing and creative. (3) Carpenters enjoy working with their hands. (4) My father, a carpenter, opened a woodworking shop.

Supporting Details Tell more about the topic sentence. Facts Description Examples Explanation

Closing Sentence Restates the topic sentence Summarizes the main points in the paragraph Tells us ‘so what’

Closing Sentence Topic Sentence: Through the centuries, rats have managed to survive our efforts to destroy them. Closing Sentence: In spite of all of our efforts, the rats continue to do well.

Closing Sentence Topic Sentence: There is no day without kimchi on the table in my country Korea. Closing Sentence: Kimchi is an indispensable side dish at meals in Korea.

The paragraph A topic sentence Supporting details Closing or transition sentence

So remember…

Stay away from...

or this...

But we do want this...

Let’s Eat Write!

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