The Foundations of Body Language

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Information about The Foundations of Body Language
Self Improvement

Published on September 27, 2014

Author: aoweiyang

Source: slideshare.net

Description

An introduction to, and overview of the topic on Body Language.

BODY LANGUAGE — THE F@U[r‘~{J ©AT[I©NS —

  • WHAT’S INSIDE 0 9 6:3 6 Whylearn Appreciating Body Cultural Nuts&Bo| ts Kegegmfsof flemst language? Differences WW
  • EARLY CONTRIBUTORS or-' BODY LANGUAGE llbarles Danvin concluded that humans‘ ability to express ""3 “'51 WW" WW3" WM 3X“'"3lV9'll emotionsfeelings, and attitudestbrougb posture and 3|1|1T°55l"E'1°l1ll'3"E"32°Moll" 3"'W9T'5 gesture, stems from prehistoric apesthat most resemble c"m“w“'A3 “THE NATURAL LANGUABE “F today’s chimpanzees in his published findings -THE THE "RN11 EXPRESSIUN or THE EMUTIUNS IN MAN AND ANIMALS. 1644 1372 E 1700 1800 1605 English philosopher, politician and scientist, Sir Francis Bacon, wrote and published his work -UFTHE PRUFIEIENBE AND AlIllANlIElllENT [IF LEARNIN[: .lJIllINEllNl1 HUMAN. In it, Bacon mentioned about gestures of the body when discussing the concept of knowledge of ourselves. He was arguably the first person to consider body language from an empirical perspective.
  • EARLY CONTRIBUTORS OF BODY LANGUAGE When SILENEE MUVIES were interpretations of human first iauaaaaaa, mi iaamaa behaviour, based on ethological research, were | mw[1isp| ayfee| ing3,attitu|1e published in THE NAKED APE. Further publications and and status by mimicking the media presentations continueto reveal how much our my iaagaaga aniaa aiaaaaataa non-verbal behaviour is based on our animal nature. they played. ' 1 O 5 Paul Ekman and W V Friesen developed the FAEIALAIITIUN 1 9 505 l3lll]| Nll SYSTEM (FAl2S)to measure, describe, and interpret Amman anthropologist R-8! facial behaviourslhis instrument is designed to measure mwmsten mum“ KINESIES eventhe slightest facial muscle contractionsand determine _ _ _ what category or categories each facial action fits into. It as “'3” "A '"A""A 3"“ mam“ can detect whatthe naked eye can't and is used by law A" """“’e"”' heha‘"°"" enforcement agencies, film animators, and researches of human behaviour.
  • Why Learn Body language?
  • fsodtg language 3 . l p i, ,» ---4-L SWMAS Ci’ Is; /'2'. I” won orig words i «gov can ever i — ~ l vitcr. l (I A i; ¢:%j v‘ : ‘;s” "s. ,r—$”"fi2""*+>: _,'Vi7/ sll «
  • speech is a reiaiiveig new introduction to the communication process and is mainig used to conveg information. including facts and data.
  • eodg language, on the other hand, has been around forever. without relging on the spoken word for confirmation, the mags movements conveig feelings, attitudes, and emotions.
  • eodg language, on the other hand, has been around forever. without relging on the spoken word for confirmation, the bodg's movements conveg moods, attitudes, and emotions. Like it or not, gour bodg language, or non-verbal behaviour, sags more about gou, gour emotions, moods, and attitudes than gou mag want to reveal X , . T . ' ‘t . —= ‘:LL‘»‘~ ‘. 1/ ~
  • t<u, Al“filre ftI§! L'l’/ .we. ll»*'l’Jll’Al' tih, sriaill~Ieirrosl A, 'i‘l. t,V. -*‘. -"‘ fit . e;iei: tl, i.ii-iielitl " I4l'i~'i, l'. ‘l, l"f', r; i,; «_ii; ;'. «Lfii : l"(’)! l§'Efi’(z‘ vs. -vIii'(i: ‘.l: ‘, in gcniiil any ‘iii/ Jlli lfi'. ;"‘i%: i'~: ’f_I. 'l. ,/at/ z', ,,. iiliialii '1/, Alio'ic. 'l iiiil "11“i7J1]" t-iriela/2?‘, iiiil ci, ri"i'. .ii‘i'. .-iriztlimb; W1
  • 33‘1'0W C0.)/ ¢*dW@11@1(S d1SO0V¢Wd V0W 1'0 d¢C1P1’@Y . an/ n1'S and 1'0 Cmllffi WOVdS 1'0 COHVM m¢SSag¢. 1'V0lg Y0ll0d Oil 1'V0lY b0dl0S 1'0 00WltVlUfll00.1'0. F. W. I: 5 0 ; V— — . . theg instinctivelg knew that fear, annogance, surprise and love were different attitudes reauiring different gestures. .. E 3-. » 4“ V I ‘W , ‘§_
  • For over centuries, psgchologists. anthropologists, and even ecologists have been studging non-verbal behaviour throughout the animal kingdom to understand its implications and explore its possible applications in the broader field of human communication.
  • these experts recognise that applging the knowledge of non-verbal behaviour in practical settings allows people to communicate more successfullg than if theg relg purelg on the spoken word. ii iii
  • . _ I ¢ . V f 1 *2” r w . . . , _. /, -' ,1 I (‘L . P ~~ ~ . . “ . .J_ '1‘ ' Q 0 . - 1-X, - . ‘ , “ _ . I ' a : ‘ 5:. ‘ 4 1 I5‘: (. . ' 4, ""¢ ‘ . 5 ‘ ‘ :4 i , ., K‘, A 4:’. I V ‘A . A _ , :-rigs _ . 5' ~ 1 x -- l r-- 5- M / '- -' T‘ , _ I As‘ '-. -s ‘:1: t . x' A " 4- ~ C . 'x‘- - .1 ~ , ;.—'_ a‘ , .'_ _ t : _., - ‘ ‘Qt? 1‘ 3 ‘ “ ' J "4? , /or : ~ * ~ » 1 5i. ;‘: : » 1 ”‘*' K ’ ‘v"- <2 . . 4:. » . E at ‘ . ~_'; i ‘ to 1.. .. 4.1;’ '~_ ‘ s . ' . . , L. Research into primate behaviour concludes that non-verbal behaviour, including gestures and facial expressions, is a reliable source for conveging messages.
  • Wi0TV0Y lg0U like 1'0 1'iit'iiL 01’ lg0UYSOi‘i’ as an Milli/ i0J OY li01', the 1Tl}1'i iS, lg0ll are.

    And like all animals, the wag gou gesture, move, and position gour bodg tells an observer a lot more about gou than the words gou sag.

    '. '~r ‘throughout the animal kingdom, bad language is a constant and reliable form of communication.

    ' J1 ! .r . .,~‘- throughout the animal kingdom, bad language is a constant and reliable form of communication. whether on two, four, or more legs, homo sapiens and the rest of the animal kingdom are constantt stein one another up as “ theg prepare or a riendlg, or unfriendig, « encounter. -"in ,

    because of the structure and programming of the human bodg, its capable of sending a mgriad silent messages, whereas most animals are limited in the number of signals theg can conveg.

    Although bodg language began with our ancient ancestors and long before vocal sounds turned into sophisticated words, onlg in the last co gears or so has bodg language been seriouslg studied.

    During that time, people have come to appreciate the value of bodg language as a tool for enhancing interpersonal communication. J I

    ._ ‘t | ' . .. ,‘. ‘I Politicians, actors, and high-profile individuals recognise the part that their bodies plag in conveging their messages.

    tag performing specific actions and gestures, gou can create corresponding mental states.

    tag performing specific actions and gestures, gou can create corresponding mental states. eg practising the gestures, gou experience the positive / ~ impact of bodg language A ‘ 1 . . and discover how to , pp create the image -- %i. i‘‘, ‘ gou want.

    eg improving gour reading of bodg language,

    6g improving gour reading of bodg language, understanding how gour bodg convegs messages, H‘?

    6g improving gour reading of bodg language, understanding how gour bodg convegs messages, and recognising how mood and attitude are reflected “ in gour gestures and expressions,

    tog improving gour reading of bodg language, understanding how gour bodg convegs messages, and recognising how mood and attitude are reflected . in gour gestures and expressions, gou have the upper hand in gour v r interpersonal communications. W, I

    , s 6g recognising and responding to bodg signals gou can direct the flow of the conversation and facilitate meetings easilg and effectivelg. AA . -r é' jj

    ‘-~ It’! ‘ "; —. I : -r‘ A _“ ‘x ‘“"; *': "i-~ __ i. ' ‘ . ‘; Sfa. '__ - ~ _ . ‘Tl —~- I p _‘ I‘, I i - ‘ ' l . _ 4' ( the point of knovvlng bodg language is for gou to become conscious of the non-verbal communication, ‘i both gour own and other people's. l E” - . ‘ ‘I‘ we I . " t _ r" l , - l

    ‘-~ 21/ - -'; —. I If . .-‘ 0 - __ __ . ' ‘“““': "t-- A, I f - g __ . ;-Aa. __ . - ~ — i *l I»: <~Q— _ I . ' ‘- . / A ‘I ' _x' _ p f , . ‘''-~ I’ _‘ 7 * If t i‘ 1- ( pp. ’ the point of knowing bodg language is for gou to become conscious of the non-verbal communication, l both gour own and other people's. that wag, ittl aid gou in correctig interpreting gestures, movements, and expressions, so as to _. x’ i’ enhance gour communication. I ‘I

    Appreciating Cultural Differences

    How much more exciting, interesting stimulating it is to live in a world with difference and diversitg, . rather than one in which evergthing B

    even though gou appreciate the differences between cultures and nationalities, gou mag sometimes find gourself confused, scared, or even repelled bg displags of bodg language that are verg . different from what goure used to.

    For example, lets take a look at this "okag" gesture in which one make a circle with his index finger and thumb while the other fingers raised slighttg=

    For example, lets take a look at this "okag" gesture in which one make a circle with his index finger and thumb while the other fingers raised slighttg: North Americans use this to indicate UK or approval.

    For example, lets take a look at this "okag" gesture in which one make a circle with his index finger and thumb while the other fingers raised slighttg: North Americans use this to indicate UK or approval. / ‘$5.; You're regarded as vulgar if you make this sign in Brazil.

    For exarhple, let's take a look at this "okag" gesture in which one make a circle with his index finger and thumb while the other fingers raised slighttg= North Americans use this to indicate fill or approval. For the French, the gesture stands for zero or nothing. You're regarded as vulgar if you make this sign in Brazil.

    For example, lets take a look at this "okag" gesture in which one make a circle with his index finger and thumb while the other fingers raised slighttg: North Americans use this F to indicate UK or approval. a , ’ Forthe French, the gesture stands for zero or nothing. _ / ‘$5.; ’ Wm regarded as vulgar if When the Japanese make this you make this sign in Brazil. Sign them sig"am"gm°"eA'

    Different nationalities and cultures use their bodies differenttg.

    Dii’ 1’ 0T0fi1' l‘iMi0t'l(Lii1i0S Mid 00i1'WOS V30 1'V0iY b0di0S di‘i’f0Y0fi1'ilg. An acceptable gesture in one countrg mag land gou in some kind of trouble in another. @ try ‘ I ,0 '0 0 x

    before visiting or moving to another countrg, do gour homework and find I out whats suitable and whats not.

    before visiting or moving to another countrg, do gour homework and find I out whats suitable and whats not. l g """""""" ’/ I , .,. A , before making a gesture, think at whether its appropriate and 9*“ , . acceptable before doing so.

    Nuts 8. Bolts

    KINESIBS: THE CATEGORIES [IF GESTURE the American anthropologist, Rag birdwhistell, was a pioneer in the studg of non-verbal behaviour.

    i : iiiii: li: ::'; Ill : :li'i«: ilTl: ii£. %. ii +l~. s:: iiiil: A the American anthropologist, R015 3iYdWi/ iS1'0ii, W05 0 PTOMZY in the studg of non-verbal behaviour. He labelled this form of communication 'kinesics' as it relates to movement of individual bodg parts, or the bodg as a whole.

    i<inesics conveg specific meanings that are open to cultural interpretation.

    l<inesics conveg specific meanings that are open to cultural interpretation. the movements can be misinterpreted when communicating across cultures as most of them are carried out with littte, if ang, awareness.

    Kinesics conveg specific meanings that are open to cultural interpretation. the movements can be misinterpreted when communicating across cultures as most of them are carried out with littte, if ang, awareness. in todags global environment, awareness of the meanings of different kinesic movements is important in order to avoid sending the wrong message.

    eoiiding on fiirdwinisrelrs work. Professor Paul aiaman and his coiieagve waiiowe V Friesen classified kinesics info five categories: v .0 '0 O 0

    F/ MDIZMS M6 non—veriooi SIQYIMS ‘Ni11’ 0. Vflfbal 6Q/ iV(. U€fl1'. ‘o n 9 '0 9

    6Wib| (&WS OX2 H071-VZYDOJ signous MM 0. VZYDOJ £QViVOJ@n1'. ifw «. ‘ ff, ‘ iii}? / [ ~i ‘ W 5‘ ‘WW4 are easilg idfiflfififid DMQUSZ ’meg're f regveniig l/ SM in SWOWIC OOHWXTS.

    F/ MDIZMS M6 non—veriooi SIQYIMS ‘Ni11’ 0. Vflfbal 6Q/ iV(. U€fl1'. ‘WW5 M6 easilg ideniified because 1'V6lg’Y¢ freg/ enng (ISM in SP¢0H’i0 00n1'£X1'S. ‘WW PWSOH receiving 1'V@ g6STW¢ immediareig EMBLEMS . . Vfld@YS1'(1fldS WV0.1' I1’ M60.flS.

    ‘3{': ;’}. ‘- examples of I ; i -_a, ‘ emblems inclvde f-'-A ; a_ d 19%, .. THE V-SHAPED SIGN Winston Churchill made the victory sign popular. The palm of the hand laces forwards with the middle and forefingers held 0 0.. n

    . «- /1). . . .r‘ THE RAISED ARM AND TIDHTIY CIDSED FIST lienerally the fist is used as an expression of solidarity or defiance. In 1990 Nelson Mandela walked free of prison holding this position. Amongst black rights activists in the United States the raised fist is known as the black power salute.

    THE FINDER Americans hold the middle finger of the hand in an upright position, with the hack of the hand lacing out. In Britian it's more common to hold up your index and middle fingers with the hack of your hand lacing out. Both gestures mean the I same thing and the meanings quite II rude. I EMBIEMS

    -- EMBIEMS ‘A THE SIDN DE THE BIJDIIDID Your index and little fingers are extended pointing forward with your palm facing down, making ‘horns’. Your thumb crosses over yourtwo middle fingers. You're telling an Italian that his partners been unfaithful. In Texas, this gesture is the sign for fans of the University of Texas Longhorns football team and has nothing to do with infidelity.

    Illustrators create a visual image and support the spoken message. Theg tend to be subconscious movements occurring more regularlg than emblematic kinesic movements. '0 '0 9 : o. I. .IE. ‘§III: 'vI| IiI-‘ ‘ ‘ U

    ~ : Ii‘f‘. fitIII'I£-i. |IIsYl’I. :'!3 i »: at .4 § ~ _I I ‘*1.’ ‘J : 5% V La’ » , (‘ ' E’ , /, I v , . »-/ If / I -. ..; .‘ ‘mi. . . . . T ‘flu. ____ _. /r ~"‘ —~. 4 ""‘ T / I: 2) Q lg 7‘ 1'' ‘bf; I: in If A a. .‘ o . ’ . . 1 ~ ll I‘ - 4 L. i. . I ‘J v p I , T. g . L. I ‘. J [ 'z'- _ : :": *': . V‘”‘. *‘-_"": ‘ J. '21:? ” __ _ Téj. ” " / s as . r~. I____‘‘ /1. p __ Q / N, / ,__f l»- «I l: -: l l, _ ', :I_- la. : I: 1 A > ' ofi. - ' . _/ A ‘ J p ‘ ’ V K _; ¥ I , . i ‘ 1 . ,. I -/ ' D t I—- - . .-.4a. . 4.. .. 32:91}. ,; I‘ _ . ... _¥ Affective displags tend to be movements, usuallg facial gestures, displaging specific emotions.

    ihegre less conscious than illustrators and occur less freauentlg. Atthough theg conveg universal emotions and can be understood fairlg easilg, the degree and freopencg with which theg occur is determined bg cultural mores. ~ : Ii‘f‘. f‘. tIII'I. r’-i. |II~Yl’I. :'!3

    Regulators — bodg movements that control, adjust, and sustain the flow of a conversation — are freopenttg relied on to feedback how much of the message the listener has understood NUH-UH TO YOUR UH-HUI‘)

    examples of regulators: Head nodding Eye movements

    Adapters serve to make us more comfortable. release excess energg. pacifg nervousness or shift weight to change posture. : l|l; l"'I "I3

    l/ tang adaptor movements, such as shifting position while seated or scratching the bodg, mag be simplg a wag of resolving a specific phgsical situation, such as being uncomfortable or itchg rather than revealing emotions and attitudes. .

    INBDRN RESPDNSES A I'I2Wb0Yl'I babg SYYTII2S, ‘TTOWYIS, and CYI2S and TI’2S2 reactions (LY2I'I‘I' I'OllgVI'. ITIDOYTI Y2SPOI'IS2S 1'0 SP20I‘f’I0 SITYYIVII O8 SUCH Y2qUIY2 H0 PYOOITO2 DY I<I'IOWI2dg2 Mid OX2 P2Y‘T’0YYVI2d I/ YIOOYISOIOUSM, VHPYOMPT 2d, (Mid f‘flTV0llI' S2I‘T’-O! IO. IIgSIS.

    lriftgiihl an i'fTflIli"}'l I; l.. f’iIlII't‘l if. like ‘ileii: ;

    think of gour brain as being L. programmed A, i like a computer. ;. A ‘E e

    IT'S encoded to connect precise reactions with particular stimuli involving inputs and outputs. / .; . . V‘. -‘ii: think of gour »_. W“ “3 WWI . ’.. ;fE: .-. .». - . . programmed is 3%. ; ; >{fip. , / ’ like a computer.

    IT'S encoded to connect precise reactions with particular stimuli involving inputs and outputs. pa W. “ “T D? ” a if the stimuli. or brainasbeing la. .3 I J v , in ut, tri ers ‘. PV06V0Lm3/ifed I) fésé apreactioggor

    IT'S encoded to connect precise reactions with particular stimuli involving inputs and outputs. / .; . . V‘. -‘ii: bmfikgbgfxr L g /9‘ (iv the stimuli. or 0 '~ 2 ,3? . , a i , » input, triggers . i’"W“"‘"‘“d ' 4:_‘ ) fir a reaction. or like a computer. ~ gr - Q/ fl g: y, .,‘§: ._? p,. ./< OVWW '‘ 1’_/ /)4; E> ) / A the process is straightforward and simple, reg/ iring no prior experience or learned behaviour.

    4 “ "vi l xi r I" I I I I II J V . ~— < V; I I . ' ‘. . flilsil-wéxsziiiIzlgxguaxqgxcfiavpihxixggv. -_. u.__-'1. I A A’ J . . - .1 An example of inborn behaviour is the rapid raising and lowering of the egebrows as a sign of greeting, a gesture that can be seen around the world

    stamping feet in anger and baring teeth when enraged also seem to be inborn behaviours.

    stamping feet in anger . ’ and baring teeth when T‘ *. enraged also seem to be inborn behaviours. ‘ ~ ~ a it seems that no matter how far humans evolve from their prehistoric relatives, the basic urges and actions remain the same. ‘I l , /-xx-4 ll

    - g LEARNED GESTIIRES Héad i/ lost people around the world are born with similar hands. arms. and legs. and move and gesture with them in prettg much the same wag.

    LEARNED GESTIIRES I-A031’ people around the world are born with similar hands, arms, and legs, and move and gesture with them in prettg much the same wag. An African warrior, a wall street trader. and a Japanese farmer with their similar arms. all discover, at some point in their lives. how to fold them across their chests.

    No one taught them how to take that pose. During the growing up process, as theg became familiar with their bodies, theg unconsciouslg discovered theg were able to do this. ,, (-. i ,2 ix _/ /f . »~ -~. . _ J’ -/ ;- . " ‘i I v I ' ‘I TTT '41 I‘ ‘I ‘Y ‘I '/ '2 ~‘‘ p I‘. ,2‘: if‘ '5» *3‘ l " " II I I‘ - it i . i v ,6 «" til it i ‘It. i’ / p I nil l‘ 4 ti .9 . . , :-7? l E T i I if I l I . ..r : ;.: p e » . -; M - « I. <5 :5 I it‘) 6/ ‘WE

    vlost of the time gou don't even know how gou perform the gesture.

    vlost of the time gou don't even know how gou perform the gesture. when gou cross gour arms over gour chest, which ones on top?

    vlost of the time gou don't even know how gou perform the gesture. when gou cross gour arms over gour chest, which ones on top? S22 VWOT I YVi2Mi?

    A . the anglish eoologist, human behavioural scientist, and pi author, Desmond i/ lorris, believes that human beings have an abundant varietg of actions that, in addition to being geneticallg inherited, are learned behaviours. . LI '7‘

    Q some of these behaviours are discovered, others are absorbed. some are taught, and still others are acquired in a combination of wags. A 5,

    Key Types (if Gestures

    l lllliltl-Illlllllhl tie: :iii: ie: : ”“W“I‘I”‘. “I ‘3“3“”“.3.m m"W“"”3 that inhibit gour abilitg to act.

    l tiiiiitt-zltiitiiiii tie: :iii: ie: : ”“W“I‘I”‘. “I ‘3“3I"”.3.m "”"‘“‘/ ‘om that inhibit gour abilitg to act. theg are gestures implging that gou have no intention of moving from where gou are.

    l iiiiiitt-zltiiiiiiii tie: :iii: ie: : ”“W“I‘I”‘. ‘“ ‘3“3I"”.3.‘m "’¢”‘W“""3 that inhibit gour abilitg to act. theg are gestures implging that gou have no intention of moving from where gou are. theg hold gou back, wont let gou go, and p ‘ . - gour bodg sags that gou're not budging.

    l iiiiiitt-zltiiiiiiii tie: :iii: ie: : ”“W“I‘I”‘. ‘“ ‘3“3I"”.3.‘m "’¢”‘W“""3 that inhibit gour abilitg to act theg are gestures implging that gou have no intention of moving from where gou are. theg hold gou back, wont let gou go, and p ‘ . - gour bodg sags that gou're not budging. I l i And no amount of outside influence to I get gou to move is going to succeed V N; l

    £XMYiPI23 0‘I’ llTiIYiT2Y'iTTOYiOI g23TW23 OX2: l lips pressed together A hand or finger in front of the mouth qé Folded Arms crossed legs

    3/‘ K x I A. / / 2. TV232 O2TTOYi3 OII K22? Ig0ll Ifi PIO22.

    these actions all keep gou in place. You cant speak with gour hand in front of gour mouth.

    these actions all keep gou in place. You cant speak with gour hand in front of gour mouth. crossed arms sag that goure holding back.

    Ii id). ' ' T 4 ‘ / C _ (of. . - A ‘xi "T ‘T’ ‘ K / __ : .. I A. / /1. _’ ’ these actions all keep gou in place. You cant speak with gour hand in front of gour mouth. crossed arms sag that gou're holding back. You cant walk when gour legs are crossed

    SIGNATIIRE GESTURES A SIQYIOTVY2 g23Ti/ Y2 I3 OYI2 TI’OT ig0l) b200Wi2 KYTOWYI Dig. O. 00WiYVi0Yi g23TUT2 TI’OT Ig0U P2Y‘T’OTYVi in O POXTTOVIOX wag.

    _ . I/ I signature gestures set one / , , _ , , I , /I apart from all others and ii * “ mag give clues about the . , >. I i ' personts personalitg, I / ti /

    cg recognising signature gestures, gou can tell what kind of person gou're dealing with

    eg recognising signature gestures, gou can tell what kind of person goure dealing with "‘. O2YTOIfi g23TiJY23. IIK2 OIOPPIYIO TI2 IMid3 T0@2TI’i2Y 0f'i02. SI’i0W O Wiifid TIOT'3 0YgOI'iI32d

    cg recognising signature gestures, gou can tell what kind of person gou're dealing with O2YTOII'i g2STUY2S. IiI<2 GIOPPIITO TVi2 ViMid3 T0@2TV2Y 0fiO2. 3IfiOW O Wiifid TTOI"3 0YgM'iI32d 2= " ‘The hair twirling gesture indicates that ; i TV2 P2Y30Yi YiliOig b2 O dOJg dY2OYVi2Y. , ‘I ‘

    cg recognising signature gestures, gou can tell what kind of person gou're dealing with O2YTOII'i g2STUY2S. IiI<2 GIOPPIITO TVi2 ViMid3 T0@2TV2Y 0fiO2. 3IfiOW O Wiifid TTOI"3 0YgM'iI32d ‘Ie. ;5. 2% ‘The hair twirling gesture indicates that ; i the person mag be a dag dreamer. , : pf when gou successfullg read the , .; :‘5=: :" signs gou can figure out how best to manage the person.

    l -‘till l'i? fltt| Ili~ff} Fake gestures are designed to camouflage, conceal, and foot

    m Fake gestures are theg deliberatelg point gou in designed to camouflage, one direction to make gou believe conceal, and foot something that isnt so.

    SOYYT2 @2311/V23 TIfOT OY2 00YYiYYi0TiIig ‘T'OIL2d OY2= . / ‘I . il * M“ — 4'11)‘ if I E ‘V I- 3 Rushing ’ .1 . " ~ Crying / V 2‘ l / N ‘F < , ‘ RITA ‘V I f‘ t . ‘ ‘ ' _ Trolvning

    one is able to tell a fake gesture from a real one because some of the real gestures parts are usuallg missing.

    one is able to tell a fake gesture from a real one because some of the real gestures parts are usuallg missing. Alwogs look for the signs. For example, to spot a fake smile, check the eges and which direction the mouth moves. Whenthe orbicularisoculi muscle contracts, it narrows Majority of smiles push the the eyesanywherefromjusta Iittletocompletelyshut. The same muscle causes _ crow'steettotormatthe --' corners of the eyes. face upward, meaningfuller cheeks, and a N-shaped smile. — — — The lower set of teeth should usually not be visible unless a person opens his/ her mouth to smile or laugh. A FaileSmih

    MICRU GESTURES Micro gesrvres are flashes of emoiion fnaf flicker ewross gour face in at frewiion of on second, reveeuing feelings that gov mag prefer fo keep fo govrself. Micro expression indicating contempt

    These gesfvres give a brief hinf of whafs going on inside. I ‘’ ,2"/ .. , Q - / /1 - / 1' ' , :' (C. .{ , . s . r f ‘ I '1'}? p. l —. ~ ' ": Y': », o x K . I I

    These gesfures give a brief hinf of whafs going on inside. ‘Wig arenf ones that gou purposelg choose. You choose to smile, wave. and rise from a chair. You donf choose to have a micro gesrure flicker across gour face and no one is immune ro them.

    GOWlYYl0fl| ig KYIOWH Wli0Y0 QZSTVYZS 000W Wl(Llr'l| lg around The ¢igZS (Md Wl0l/11/l area. lr , f__. ,,, _9_$ anger { 5; . .2»; disgust P . :j‘“’ . ‘. ..: ~. 1 fear 1 4}) . ,-mo. -. dru-n ’ v. ! n. u---m 1' :1 7 Jlxj happiness 5?’ ’43>~ sadness surprise , r. en. —-n ««.4.. ‘f l l~; _.. l ‘ »: I’ moo: ax» arm 4 . ... . cl _ . wound up (nu-I; ’ , I I. -_ vudcnea . . “'1 'o<u in nu l -‘ no-omnnl min I J I moglh open mule lhal , an Wll, -3 mm "___, .‘ 3.. .. . ___. . __ _ _ ~ '_ ma we -r- __‘ v, 9! cam. .. . _ ~ 17 V ‘ A ‘ :1 / V V _. 1 . _., - . ‘<) , .', L. -fl 5 41, pprV| rul. In~. r<! . / lfyrlfi m ‘/ 1 «’ llI‘1 . .,. .. ' A - rurrcwnnq olme lip} 7 , __ _'_ . ..— M. »-. . 5 lr-¢J . .-. ., ..: . "V ' - p l ' "4 . u4 V , l--. u>: .- '. ., . l a V . . ‘V. .. . -_. . J ~. F’ F7 ‘ ,4‘? -.

    Ilffi" . :i! }»§l'l| ¥'Ii“ii Hvfiiillllifi when goure feeling conflicling emolions, gou mag engage in gestures that have no relalion fo gour immediafe goals.

    These behaviours are moslig self—dlrec’red and serve to release excess energg and gain a feeling of comforf. even if onlg femporarg.

    These behaviours are moslig self—direc’red and serve to release excess energg and gain a feeling of comforf. even if onlg femporarg. Drumming fingers, H g flicking feef, going if i’ ’ for a glass of wafer ‘ip i when goure nor even ; p:_, L . ihirslig - these are The l ’ behaviours of someone i who's looking To burn some penr up energg, 3-. or at least, refocus i .

    called displacemenf aclivilies lhegire a conduit for excess energg fhars looking for a place 0 go. I / /T, » }' ‘ . ‘ iL; = ‘- ‘X * , . 7‘ . » i ““‘. ~3._ ‘i 5 1“ ~ ‘ ‘i‘ . ‘ . I ‘ I KC 1 i « ‘/ ‘ ; ’ ' / . — . X: lg i / ~ ii , , 1 g ’ , 7 . / A1; «/ i i

    examples of displacement gestures are: Shifting/ Twistingthe ring Fiddling with objects Running iingersthroughthe hair

    UNIVERSAL GESTURES universal gestures. such as blushing. smiling, and the wide—eged expression of fear, mean the same thing across world cultures.

    UNIVERSAL GESTURES universal gestures, such as blushing, smiling, and the wide—eged expression of fear, mean the same thing across world cultures. These gestures stem from human biological make—up, which is whg gou can recognise them spanning the globe.

    Get The Most llut til it

    successful people know .5. how to use their bodies for greatest effect.

    successful people know :5, how to use their bodies for greatest effect. Theg stand tall, with their chests opened like a well loved book, smiles on their faces, and when theg move, theg move with purpose.

    successful people know :5, how to use their bodies for greatest effect. Theg stand tall, with their chests opened like a well loved book, smiles on their faces, and when theg move, theg move with purpose. Their moderate Mid carefullg / ~« “ chosen gestures reflect their sense , of what theg want to project and ’ how theg want to be perceived I

    BECOME SPAT| AllY AWARE understanding how to position themselves in relation to other people is a skill that some people just dont seem to have. .

    either thegre so up close and personal that gou can smell their morning coffee breath. or theg stand just that bit awag that makes them appear uninterested, unengaged, or slightig removed

    others, however, know just how to get it right. Theg understand and respect the different territories and parameters that people have around themselves, and being with them is comfortable.

    -. “~. . , . - * €; c2’§: ‘;§f fix; . You have a personal, individual space bubble that gou stand, sit, and move around in, and it expands and contracts depending on circumstances.

    The studg of PRHXEMIBS, how people use and relate to the space around them to communicate, was pioneered bg edward T Hall, an American anthropologist in the | ‘l(o0S. lnthnate Space . / ‘Ch; 2 Sodal T Pubfic leg; g Space E Space 12ftE 3.7m- N on 3., ’ . ._ .

    His findings revealed the different amounts of personal space that people feel theg need depending on their social situation. . T’ "'lZVl7."’. ‘ _— _ 4 '. ‘.‘: .'r *3. 4 . _" , _/'I. ‘.‘;3‘, ‘I 'u'. ."y‘, f.’ . :: 5'-—''l$-‘! " ‘ - | 'I'-'5 ‘‘ '1': ' AA 9-911 , ‘l , '., ""; L'-': '~ n S‘. ' v ; . ~‘. , ‘.17': /.-. '- ' i’ I’. /I -- . r. ';'ea. y,«f-; ~./ ."/ .r'. ’.’. ,’ ‘J1’

    ANTICIPATE MOVEMENTS movement can be equated T0 dance. |T’S more than jl/ ST the gestures themselves, lT'S about the timing OT them as Well

    .-f -. "E: ‘ ‘ ‘. T / ‘ I ’. Anticipating an action and registering that its about to happen before it does, gives gou . -. e information that others mag not grasp. . --"e ' E. .‘‘r -

    Anticipating a movement can save gour life. it can keep gou from harm.

    it mag also bring gou great happiness, like a lover's first kiss which, had gou missed the movement. gou mag have lost.

    You gotta trust me. Bg anticipating gestures, gou gain the upper hand in knowing how to respond before the action is completed

    33! I. ':i""| IC" when gou talk about establishing rapport goure K S talking about accepting 2. and connecting with other _ people and treating one another with respect. / / ,

    33' T». A at, - 4 I II _ I . E E I . ,n fit ‘. ’~ ll’ . ‘-7 "*5 ” r Rapport assures that gour communications are effective and lead to results that satisfg both parties’ needs.

    A l . —_ " ~ ‘I’ . . ' " / . g A A 4 J‘ —: r ? ’ -——°‘' ~ ~‘ "-7” E’ E ' 4. : _ * . r _ V . - ’_. ,;~ p_/ - ~‘» _ ‘V l g , _ 5 - x V . jl’ _—. . * You have mang wags of creating rapport, ’ ” ‘ through T0ll0h. WOYd choice, and contact.

    Another wag is to reflect another person 's movements.

    Another wag is to reflect another person 's movements. tsg mirroring and matching the other person's gestures and behaviours goure demonstrating that gou know what it feels, sounds, and looks like to be in her shoes.

    if connecting with others and behaving respectfullg is important to gou, mirroring and matching their behaviour helps gou achieve that goal

    I A fine line exists between reflecting another person 's gestures and mimicking him.

    People who are being mimicked oiuicklg figure out what goure doing and recognise gour insinceritg. A fine line exists between reflecting another person 's gestures and mimicking him.

    BEIIIIMING VIHII VIIII WANT Tl] BE How gou present gourself, how gou move and gesture, how gou stand, sit, and walk all plag their part in creating the image gou present and in determining people's perceptions.

    R ’ . .p‘ . O o 6g adopting a cluster of postures, positions, and gestures known for the attitudes theg effect, gou can create ang attitude and make it gour own. I I 7'

    The behal/ IOW lg0l) adopt and the gestures that lg0U make leave an impression. . . --, , _, ‘.4.‘. ’.« I 3’. _ ‘ W-e: ~-“. All .3‘-1 , , , --; - . s . _, _. v » '-7« , -' ‘ ' . ,~. . . 1”", ~ . J4.’ _ . ‘ , , _ . - ‘

    The behaviour gou adopt and the gestures that gou make leave an impression. i/ lake sure that gour gestures reinforce the impression gou want to make.

    LET’S RECAP Nuts 8. Bolts - Kinesics Einhlenis Illustrators Affective Displays Regulators Adapters - lnhornResponses - Learnedflestures Vlhy leam Body language? Appreciating cultural Differences NNVN lley Types of Gestures Unintentional Signature Fake Micro Displacement Universal liet The Most out of It Become Spatially Aware Anticipate Movements Create Rapport Becoming Who You Want to he

    ideas adapted (mainlgl from ‘EODY LAll(ail)A(si£ For Dummies eg elieoebelln l<uhiike P‘ I’ . I { slides big Yang Ao wei

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