advertisement

The Church and the Teacher

50 %
50 %
advertisement
Information about The Church and the Teacher
Spiritual-Inspirational

Published on September 25, 2017

Author: cgarland

Source: authorstream.com

advertisement

The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Slide 2: “We’re looking for someone with a doctorate in Christian education and five years experience, but we’ll settle for someone with a van.” Introduction: Introduction The Church as the Body The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Ekklesia “ Ekklesia ” is the Greek word for “church.” It comes from “ ek ” = out and “ kaleo ” = to call. Thus, an “ ekklesia ” is a people called out to be an assembly ; a church.” The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Note that there are two parts to this: the Church is not just “called out” (of darkness), but the Church is also called to “assemble” together . The Church is not the Church unless the people assemble together. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Soma Christou “Body of Christ” – (metaphorically) the many members, but one, unified Church (1 Cor. 12:27). The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Just as a body has many members with many different functions, so the “Body of Christ”—the Church—has many members (1 Cor. 12:27) functioning with different gifts. The church has the potential for great unity in diversity—and to demonstrate that to the world. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Each of us brings a gift, a service, and a “kind of working” that is unique and necessary to strengthening others. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Consider the Teacher. In the Body of Christ, many may teach (due to their circumstances), but some are called to teach as a gift-ministry, and some of these are ordained (as 5-Fold Teachers or “Ascension Ministries”). Here are the five gifts mentioned in Ephesians 4:11. Slide 13: 5-Fold Ministries Ephesians 4:11 “It was he who gave some to be…” The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher “ Are all apostles? Are all prophets? Are all teachers?” ( 1 Co 12:29). No, of course not. We all have gifts to contribute for the building up of the Body. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher In fact, how many are teachers—in any capacity: church, schools, homeschooling, etc.? Who are teaching now in our classrooms? Slide 17: “Yes, I did help out in the Children’s Ministry today. How could you tell?” The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher How many believe they are called to other gift ministries—apostles, prophets, evangelists, or pastors? The Bible Teacher: The Bible Teacher The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Just as each gift provides its unique and important contribution to bring us to maturity in Christ, so the teacher plays his or her part in that same process (Eph. 4:11-16). Here are some characteristics of teachers and the contributions teachers bring. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher 2 Tim. 3:10 – “ You, however, know all about my teaching, my way of life, my purpose, faith, patience, love, endurance…” A teacher teaches: By precept – what he or she says. By example – what he or she is. By conduct – what he or she does. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Ezra 7:10 For Ezra (a teacher, vs. 6) had devoted himself to: the study and observance of the Law of the Lord, and to teaching its decrees and laws in Israel. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Ecclesiastes 12:10 The Teacher searched: to find just the right words (delightful words), and what he wrote was upright and true (the plain truth). The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher John 14:26 – “ But the Counselor, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you all things and will remind you of everything I have said to you.” A teacher teaches: By the anointing of the Holy Spirit. Through the Counselor—the inner Teacher. By hearing what is on the heart of Jesus. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Thus, by studying and breaking down the Word of God into understandable parts, listening to the Holy Spirit, teaching Biblical truths with precision and beauty, and by demonstrating the principles of the Bible in their daily lives… The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher …the teacher prepares “God’s people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God and become mature, attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ” (Eph. 4:12-13). The Problems of Knowledge and Truth: The Problems of Knowledge and Truth The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher The ministry of the teacher is grounded in two things: Bible knowledge and truth. However, today’s Church faces two challenges with these: Knowledge is derided. Truth is considered relative—it is relegated to personal choice. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Knowledge Derided “Knowledge puffs up” (1 Cor. 8:1) is often quoted as if knowledge is an evil thing—as if God wants us to be ignoramuses. This is despite the fact that the Bible often says to get knowledge (Ps. 119:66; Prov. 1:4; 2:10; 8:10; 15:2, etc.)—to value it highly. In fact, the Bible says that “fools hate knowledge” (Prov. 1:22) and that God’s people are “destroyed for lack of knowledge” (Ho. 4:6). The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher How do we handle this seeming contradiction? Recognize the danger of accumulating knowledge without wisdom. Wisdom says that, compared to the volume of knowledge available—especially in God—I really know very little. Wisdom balances knowledge with humility. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Also recognize that the knowledge of God is part and parcel to our calling to become Christlike. Consequently, we should highly value Christian education and make growth in the knowledge of God and His Word a life-long endeavor. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher It is also a common misnomer to think that because information is so readily available that we are really knowledgeable. But knowledge is not the same thing as information. Information is worthless unless it is evaluated and applied. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Truth as a Personal Choice The Church also faces the challenge that our culture has relegated “truth” to a personal choice. Each person finds the truth that best suits them. But there cannot logically be two opposing truths. They can both be wrong, but they both can’t be right. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Further, to challenge the belief that each person’s truth is just as true, is to be labeled bigoted and intolerant. But Christianity says that it alone has the answers and that Truth is embodied in the God-man, Jesus Christ. Christians believe that what the Bible says, God says. It is fundamentally exclusive. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Christians follow a set of non-negotiable, core beliefs derived from the Word of God. Christianity rests on the objective, revealed truth of Scripture—it says that there are absolutes. And that those absolutes are revealed in the Bible. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher In contrast, the world’s view is relativistic. It often proclaims that there is no objective truth. But if there is no objective moral truth, then who is to say what is right and wrong? Story of the old woman at the traffic light. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher The Moral Argument If God does not exist, then objective moral values and duties do not exist. Objective moral values and duties do exist. Therefore, God exists. Receiving the Teacher: Receiving the Teacher The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher “He who receives a prophet in the name of a prophet shall receive a prophet’s reward...” —Matthew 10:41 There are two underlying principles here: A messenger is as the one who sends him. (How you treat the messenger is the same as how you treat the one who sends him.) “In the name of a prophet” is a way of saying “for who he is,” that is, “receive the prophet for who he is” (one who represents the Lord as His messenger). The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher To receive a prophet, then, is to receive the prophetic word as from the Lord—from the One who sent him. The reward comes from valuing that word—from receiving it for what it is and responding to it. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher In a similar sense, then—at least in principle—we can say, “He who receives a teacher in the name of a teacher shall receive a teacher’s reward.” For each gift ministry, we should recognize the value given—that the Lord is at work in and through the individual according to their gift and the maturity of their ministry. The Church and the Teacher: The Church and the Teacher Receiving one another in this way results in “body ministry.” There is nothing a teacher would rather do than to teach. So, ask them questions and watch one of the Lord’s gifts in operation!

Add a comment

Related presentations