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TEAT Self study PPT 2007

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Information about TEAT Self study PPT 2007
Travel-Nature

Published on March 18, 2008

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Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) SSIS New Technology Course - 24th Jan 2007 T.E.A.T.  Modality, motivations, objectives, caveats, evaluation Prospective Syllabus (in my head, a priori) Retrospective syllabus (online, a posteriori) Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Modality - 24th Jan 2007 Modality: Blended course. BL is a combination of face-to-face (FtF) and computer assisted learning (CAL) in a single teaching and learning environment. The most important aim of a Blended Learning design is to find the most effective and efficient combination of the two modes of learning for the individual learning subjects, contexts and objectives. (Petra Neumeier, 2005, A closer look at blended learning – parameters for designing a blended learning environment for language teaching and learning, ReCALL, 17 (2): 163–178). Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Modality - 24th Jan 2007 So, the will be: FtF lectures (like this one) Students’ needs assessment (quickly) Personalized curricula, via: Classroom interaction D-learning Web-based materials Traditional bibliography A dedicated Forum A newsletter, if you so wish E-mail? Hmmmm... Depends Negative feedback interaction (Forum) Common final assessment (=exam) Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Objectives - 24th Jan 2007 Objectives of this course: Assuming a basic knowledge of PC usage for everyday needs, get students (you) to a critical level of tool evaluation, and develop individual ability to process, edit, produce original materials for language teaching with the aid of the Web, PowerPoint, Hot Potatoes, FrontPage, etc., and foster students’ confidence and awareness of techniques, environments, tools, possibilities used wordwode to teach FLs. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Motivations - 24th Jan 2007 Yvonne Lam, 2000, Technophilia vs Technophobia: A preliminary look at why second-language teachers do or do not use technology in their classrooms, Canadian Modern Language Review, Vol. 56, No. 3 It is "unfair to brand teachers as technophobic" and it is a lack of knowledge and support rather than fear that prevents teachers from effectively integrating technology into their second language curriculum. Slide6:  Languages come free They also go away free http://www.gazzaro.it/s/forum Pls. follow instructions to enroll Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Motivations - 24th Jan 2007 In fact, one of the implications is that teachers need more than a "how-to" lesson on technology, they need effective professional development to allow them to explore ways to use technology in their classrooms. Teachers need to be directly involved in the implementing of new technology... Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Motivations - 24th Jan 2007 The needs of teachers and students need to be taken into careful consideration in order for technology to meet its potential in the classroom context... Giving teachers time and resources to help them to be effective users of technology is a necessary part of effective implementation. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Motivations - 24th Jan 2007 John Irving, major writer. Does not even know how to switch on a computer. Are computers useless then? In the literary world at least? He has an assistant reading his manuscripts, typing them up on a PC and editing them on a PC. So... Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Motivations - 24th Jan 2007 You just cannot do without a computer, at least to communicate in written form. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Motivations - 24th Jan 2007 A few examples: http://www.gazzaro.it/accents/files/EngVowels.html Click on a sound to hear the English vowels pronounced by John Wells, Susan Ramsaran and Peter Ladefoged http://hctv.humnet.ucla.edu/departments/linguistics/VowelsandConsonants/course/chapter1/wells/wells.html Peter Ladefoged's vowels http://hctv.humnet.ucla.edu/departments/linguistics/VowelsandConsonants/course/chapter1/vowels.html Peter Ladefoged's consonants http://hctv.humnet.ucla.edu/departments/linguistics/VowelsandConsonants/course/chapter1/consonants1.html Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Motivations - 24th Jan 2007 UCL, London Phonetic symbols http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/johnm/flash/flashin.htm Voice http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wtutor?tutorial=siphtra/vb1.htm Plosives: http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wtutor?tutorial=siphtra/plostut1/plostut1.htm Intonation http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/johnm/oi/oiin.htm Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Motivations - 24th Jan 2007 Phonetic symbols http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~rogers/phthong.228/phthong228.html Transcribed words: http://www.antimoon.com/how/pronunc-trans.htm Some class revision: IPA symbols Phonemic Nursery Rhymes Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Motivations - 24th Jan 2007 Linguistics Course (University of Pennsylvania) Linguistics (Università di Lausanne) Linguistics (Russell) Linguistics (Ladefoged) Aphasias (afasie) www.gazzaro.it/b/lab www.gazzaro.it/accents Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Motivations - 24th Jan 2007 We all use technology for things like Electronic Postcards Online Writing Labs (OWLs) Keypals Mailing Lists ChatBots (www.manifestation.com/neurotoys/eliza.php3) MOO Media News Web Searching (Webquests) Students’ recordings Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Motivations - 24th Jan 2007 Pc as Tutor vs. PC as Tool (DE SZENDEFFY, J. 2005. A Practical Guide to Using Computers in Language Teaching. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press) Ten Commandments: Focus on activities, not software Wade in slowly Teach (walk, look, talk, listen) Appreciate the richness of possibilities Prepare, be patient Drive, don’t be driven (to despair) Invest in Training Plan, buffer, pace activities Be a tour guide Foster autonomy, initiative, enthusiasm Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Caveats - 24th Jan 2007 You do not NEED technology to be a good teacher BUT Good teachers know when, how, where to use technology And when NOT to use it Fashions have to be sifted Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Caveats - 24th Jan 2007 Not all students benefit from technology Techology is NOT a time-saver Nor is it a money-saver Nor is it a staff-saver We must be able to assess it and use it critically = creatively Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Caveats - 24th Jan 2007 Technology is UNSTABLE in at least two ways: computers backfire tools change quickly Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Prospective Syllabus - 24th Jan 2007 The prospective syllabus shows what is done in a complete 80-hours course. We won’t manage everything. The retrospective syllabus will tell you what was actually done, week by week. Better to know a little in depth rather than a lot superficially... Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Prospective Syllabus - 24th Jan 2007 Folders, FileNames and Extensions Files are saved on hard disk in folders, each file with an extension usually of three letters. Identifying its typology (.doc for Word Documents, .mpg or .avi for film clips, .mp3 for audio, etc.) There are sites identifying unknown extensions (ie. http://filext.com/). Use folders to keep your work tidy Back up often to CDs or DVDs, or better to an External Hard Disk Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Prospective Syllabus - 24th Jan 2007 Ignore the following 9 slides for studying purposes, they just give a general idea of what THEORETICALLY one should know before using technology in language teaching We will not touch on every single point. The REAL course begins here. Search:  Search Searching by right-clicking on a folder: asterisk = any character; *.doc will find any Word document You can also specify text within the files, dates and size specifications to limit your searches The TAB key can be used to skip from one link to the next in Internet Explorer. Shift+TAB skips backwards. 31st Jan 2007:  31st Jan 2007 File protection: encryption and decryption Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Digital Text Editing Notepad, NoteTab, NotePro, MS Word, Ooo Writer. The Alt Key: ALT+Tab, ALT+letter menus. The Control Key: CNTRL+S, CNTRL+C, CNTRL+X, CNTRL+V CNTRL+Home, CNTR+End Save, Save As..., Save As Web Page, Versions, Properties. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Edit: Undo, Clipboard, Paste Special, Select All, Find/Replace (with Word special codes), Find/Replace (with NoteTab Regular Expressions), GoTo Page, Section, Bookmark, Comment, Table, Graphic, Heading). Sections: continuous, new column, new page, even page, odd page. Page Format: Margins, Headers, Footers, LS. Paragraph formatting: L/R margins, LS, paragraph line spacing, View: Normal, Web Layout, Print Layout, Outline View, Ruler, Header/Footer. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Printing: page order, Front/Back, Hidden text, Graphics, Print Preview, Outside Margin error. Insert: Break, Page Numbers, Symbol, Cmment, Footnote, Caption, Cross-Reference, Picture, Bookmark, Object Format: Font, Paragraph, Lists, Tabs, Case Styles (normal, header, footnote) Tools: Spelling, Track Changes, Compare Documents, Macros, Templates Templates: Loading templates and add-ins; Unloading templates and add-ins Tables: Insert, Merge cells, Document Properties. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 5th Feb 2007 Data management: Excel Odering Data Formulas Statistics Charts PowerPoint: Create a Presentation, Importing data from Word, Inserting sound, clips and images. Exporting. PowerPoint Masters. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 12th Feb 2007 PowerPoint: Create a Presentation, Importing data from Word, Inserting sound, clips and images. Exporting. PowerPoint Masters. The Internet Internet: Google Searches Internet: Dictionaries Internet: Wiki- (-pedia, -books, -searches) Chatterbots Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 19th Feb 2007 M-learning, MALL, PDAs, Texting Moodle, Skype, podcasts Listservs, Forums, Newscasts MOOs Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Production Hot Potatoes, Crossword puzzles, FrontPage 7th Mar 2007 Lab and revision (in computer lab @ Lingue) 14th Mar 2007 Lab and revision (in computer lab @ Lingue) End-of-Course Evaluation:  End-of-Course Evaluation There will be a written exam, on PC in the lab @ Lingue, with: a group of open theoretical questions on CALL, based on a minimal bibliography (cf. hareafter) and on personal readings the students will have done; a group of Multiple Choice theoretical questions on PC-related topics, DTE, web-tools, programs for teaching, corpora, etc. A few practical tasks to perform and discuss/describe in English (computers under your spell). The exam will be all in English. Marking system: 20% on 1; 20% on 2; 30 % on 3; 30% on language proficiency. Bibliography:  Bibliography Texts in grey are optional, those in black are mandatory. Students will read at least the 3 ‘black’ articles, and 2 or 3 of the optional ones, according to their interests. There will be a part of the exam on the mandatory (‘black’) readings, and one optional question on the ‘grey’ readings. DAVIES, GRAHAM. 2006. Computer Assisted Language Learning: Where are we now and where are we going?, at http://www.camsoftpartners.co.uk/docs/UCALL_Keynote.htm, last accessed: 05 January 2007, last updated: 30 December 2006. BAX, STEPHEN. 2003. CALL - past, present and future. System, 31:13-28. FELIX, USCHI. 2003. Teaching languages online: Deconstructing the myths. Australian Journal of Educational Technology, 19 (1):118-38. ————. 2006. E-learning pedagogy in the third millennium: the need for combining social and cognitive constructivist approaches. ReCALL, 17 (1). NEUMEIER, PETRA. 2006. A closer look at blended learning: parameters for designing a blended learning environment for language teaching and learning. ReCALL, 17 (2). KUPETZ, RITA, e BIRGIT ZIEGENMEYER. 2006. Blended learning in a teacher training course: Integrated interactive e-learning and contact learning. ReCALL, 17 (2). HARKER, MIHYE, e DMITRA KOUTSANTONI. 2006. Can it be as effective? Distance versus blended learning in a web-based EAP programme. ReCALL, 17 (2). LELOUP, JEAN, e ROBERT PONTEIRO. 2006. Foreign Language Teachers' Greatest Hits [downloaded on 24th January 2007]. 10 (3):3-7. CHINNERY, GEORGE M. 2006. Going to the MALL: Mobile Assisted Language Learning [retrieved on 12th January 2007]. Language Learning & Technology, 10 (1):9-16, (available at http://llt.msu.edu/). FRYER, LUKE, e ROLLO CARPENTER. 2006. Bots as Language Learning Tools [retrieved on 24th January 2007]. Language Learning & Technology, 10 (3):8-14, (available at http://llt.msu.edu/). GODWIN-JONES, ROBERT. 2005. Skype and Podcasting: Disruptive Technologies for Language Learning [retrieved on 24th January 2007]. Language Learning & Technology, 9 (3):9-12, (available at http://llt.msu.edu/). STUDZINSKA-CAVOUR, GRAZYNA. 2006. CALL, WELL and TELL: Fostering Autonomy: Selected Papers from EUROCALL 2005, Kraków, Jagiellonian University, Poland. ReCALL, 18 (1):1-3, (available at. Bibliography:  Bibliography WALZ, JOEL. 2001. Reading Hypertext: Lower Level Processes. Canadian Modern Language Review, 57 (3):1-3, [available at http://www.caslt.org/research/readinghypertext.htm]. HÉMARD, DOMINIQUE. 2006. Evaluating hypermedia structures as a means of improving language learning strategies and motivation. ReCALL, 18 (1). GODWIN-JONES, ROBERT. 2004. Language in Action: From Webquests to Virtual Realities [retrieved on 12th January 2007]. Language Learning & Technology, 8 (3):9-14, [available at http://llt.msu.edu/]. CHAMBERS, ANGELA. 2005. Integrating Corpus Consultation in Language Studies [retrieved on 12th January 2007]. Language Learning & Technology, 9 (2):111-25, [available at http://llt.msu.edu/]. BRANDL, KLAUS. 2005. Are You Ready to "Moodle"? [retrieved on 12th January 2007]. Language Learning & Technology, 9 (2):16-23, [available at http://llt.msu.edu/]. WARNER, CHANTELLE N. 2004. It's Just a Game, Right? Types of Play in Foreign Language CMC [retrieved on 12th January 2007]. Language Learning & Technology, 8 (2):69-87, [available at http://llt.msu.edu/]. Bibliography:  Bibliography Books (for future, post-exam reference) CHAPELLE, CAROL A. 2003. English Language Learning and Technology. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company DE SZENDEFFY, J. 2005. A Practical Guide to Using Computers in Language Teaching. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press FOTOS, SANDRA, e CHARLES M. BROWNE eds. 2004. New Perspectives on CALL for Second Language Classrooms (Series. ReCALL). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. BARR, DAVID. 2004. ICT: Integrating Computers in Teaching: Creating a Computer-based Language Learning Environment. Bern: Peter Lang The first two are worth reading. The others, not so much... If you are lost, an extremely good reference site is: http://www.ict4lt.org/ All the quoted readings (except the books) will be downloadable from my site www.azzaro.org/ssis. Also, all these readings, with others of interest, can be obtained if you give me a writable CD in March. Retrospective Syllabus:  Retrospective Syllabus Here goes the real course... What we actually saw/did/loved/hated/(mis)understood in class 31st Jan 2007:  31st Jan 2007 Forum:  Forum The Forum for you was set up last week. To subscribe you need a valid e-mail address. Then go to www.gazzaro.it/s/Forum Please, subscribe to the “Corso speciale” Forum. Type your personal data (name, username, e-mail and password are enough) You’ll get a confirmation mail You must click on the link in that mail in order to become an active member of the Forum. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Remember!!! You do not NEED technology to be a good teacher BUT Good teachers know when, how, where to use technology And when NOT to use it Beware of fashions... Retrospective Syllabus (Online):  Retrospective Syllabus (Online) Computer Assisted Language Learning - a few acronyms: CALI (Computer Assisted Language Instruction), CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning), ATALL (Autonomous Technology-Assisted Language Learning), CALT (Computer Assisted Language Teaching), TELL (Technology Enhanced Language Learning), WELL (Web Enhanced Language Learning), LLT (Language Learning Technology), VLE (Virtual Learning Environment), Retrospective Syllabus (Online):  Retrospective Syllabus (Online) LLO (Language Learning Online), ICT (Information and Communication Technology), ICALL (Intelligent CALL), MALL (Mobile Assisted Language Learning) And many more. Methodologically, we have e-learning, d-learning, m-learning, b-learning, etc. Retrospective Syllabus (Online):  Retrospective Syllabus (Online) Yes, please become familiar with the preceding acronyms, since they often crop up in magazines, newspapers, journals, conferences, meetings minutes, and on the Internet (which, by the way, is ALWAYS capital) Retrospective Syllabus (Online):  Retrospective Syllabus (Online) Metabibliography on www.eurocall-languages.org/resources/bibliography Let’s have a quick look at one of the mandatory (black) articles you’ll read later at home Where are we now and where are we going? by Graham Davies Graham Davies on CALL, past, present and future:  Graham Davies on CALL, past, present and future A brief history of CALL 1960s: CALL begins, but only on big mainframe computers. 1976: My first contact with a computer, a Prime 300 "minicomputer", which was about the size of two Coca Cola vending machines. CALL becomes more widely available. Late 1970s: Enter the microcomputer. Christopher Evans publishes his seminal work The mighty micro, Victor Gollancz Ltd (1979). 1980s: The microcomputer boom. I bought my first microcomputer, a 32K Commodore PET, in 1980. Schools in the UK embrace the BBC Micro. CALL begins to reach the masses. Graham Davies on CALL, past, present and future:  Graham Davies on CALL, past, present and future 1980s: The professional associations CALICO (1983) & EUROCALL (1986) are established. IALL (International Assocation for Learning Labs) goes back to 1965, initially focusing on language labs. IALL is now known as IALLT (International Association for Language Learning Technology) and focuses on language learning technology in general. 1990s: Advent of the Web, which becomes publicly available in 1993. EUROCALL becomes a recognised professional association (1993). First WorldCALL conference in Melbourne, Australia (1998). 2000-: Broadband becomes more widely available, opening up new possibilities for delivering audio and video materials via the Web. Blogs and podcasts appear. A bewildering array of technology:  A bewildering array of technology radio movie projector gramophone / record player television (terrestrial) tape recorder (Anecdotal evidence suggests that most language teachers perceive the tape recorder as the invention that has had the most significant impact on language teaching and learning.) language lab videocassette recorder (VCR) A bewildering array of technology:  A bewildering array of technology computer audio CD player satellite television videodisc player CD-ROMs the Internet DVD-ROMs DVD player mobile phone personal digital assistant (PDA) The Web:  The Web Invention by Tim Berners-Lee (who happens to be British) and has transformed the nature of CALL Leap backwardslack of interactivity and, in particular, poor feedback Has not yet caught up with CD-ROMs and DVD-ROMs in terms of video quality and interactivity. Uninspiring ("boring" is another word that springs to mind) compared to established materials such as those on videocassette, audiocassette or broadcast TV Lessons from the past:  Lessons from the past Suggestions: Don't regard technology as the panacea - v. the language lab. Don't neglect training in using new technologies - v. the language lab. Open up to new ideas - v. the language lab. ICT myths:  ICT myths Delusions: Saves time - no! Saves money - no! Saves staff - no! It's a more effective way of learning - maybe, but the jury is still out. 2000-: E-learning becomes the buzzword:  2000-: E-learning becomes the buzzword The DfES's definition of e-Learning is a catch-all term; Includes all aspects of using a computer as an aid to learning, from producing a word-processed handout for one's students to following an online course in a virtual learning environment (VLE). Training: No. 1 priority:  Training: No. 1 priority If teachers are not properly trained to use the technology it will be underused and ineffective. The ICT for Language Teachers project funded by the European Commission from 1999 to 2000 to address the problem of a lack of quality training materials for language teachers. The outcome = website 16 training modules, regularly updated: http://www.ict4lt.org/ Education Minister Stephen Twigg :  Education Minister Stephen Twigg announced to MPs in May 2004 that the government was spending more than £9 million a year on education websites. This figure is steadily increasing Education Minister Stephen Twigg :  Education Minister Stephen Twigg Languages ICT Website: A website for people interested in ICT and languages, maintained by CILT and the Association for Language Learning (ALL): http://www.languages-ict.org.uk/. Education Minister Stephen Twigg :  Education Minister Stephen Twigg http://www.languages-ict.org.uk/. The former Languages ICT Forum was merged with the Linguanet Forum (see below) on 31 July 2006. Linguanet Forum: A discussion forum for language teachers, maintained by CILT: http://www.mailtalk.ac.uk/lists/linguanet-forum.html Education Minister Stephen Twigg :  Education Minister Stephen Twigg Foreign Languages as a subject area is 'different' from most other subjects it is skill-based as well as knowledge-based, and in this respect it has more in common with music than history or geography. Phases of CALL (Warschauer):  Phases of CALL (Warschauer) Warschauer (1996) distinguishes three phases of CALL: Behaviouristic :The computer as tutor. Communicative: The computer is used for skill practice, but in a non-drill format and with a greater degree of student choice, control and interaction. This phase also includes (a) using the computer to stimulate discussion, writing or critical thinking (e.g. using programs such as Sim City), and (b) using the computer as a tool or workhorse - examples include word-processors, spelling and grammar checkers, and concordancers. Integrative: This phase is marked by the introduction of two important innovations: (a) Multimedia (b) The Internet Approaches to CALL (Bax):  Approaches to CALL (Bax) Bax (2003) prefers to talk about approaches rather than phases. Bax reassesses the history of CALL, argues for three alternative categories (“approaches”): Restricted CALL Open CALL Integrated CALL Approaches to CALL (Bax):  Approaches to CALL (Bax) We are currently using the second approach, Open CALL, but that our aim should be to attain a state of 'normalisation' where the technology is invisible and truly integrated. A bewildering array of methods:  A bewildering array of methods Methodology Many people fail to make a distinction between pedagogy and methodology Mustn’t use both terms as if they are interchangeable Pedagogy & Methodology:  Pedagogy & Methodology Pedagogy is more concerned with the theory of teaching and learning, whereas methodology describes how something is or should be done Pedagogy & Methodology:  Pedagogy & Methodology In Sue Hewer's words, “the way in which the teacher structures the learning environment”. The Universal Method:  The Universal Method Beginning in the mid-eighteenth century and ending only recently, ... (the) aim had been to find a universal panacea method. It is now generally accepted that no one single such method exists.' [Whitehead M. (1996) Materials and methods 1966-1996 in 30 years of language teaching, London, CILT.]" (King 2003) The communicative approach, :  The communicative approach, The communicative approach, however, appears to have found favour among most language teachers. Decoo (2001) documents the history of language teaching methodology as follows: Methods:  Methods Traditional approach: Grammar-translation, learning vocab lists 1860s: Communicative approach 1870s: Authentic input, direct communication 1880s and 1890s: Direct Way (also known as the Direct Method) Early 20c: Decline and demise of the Direct Method 1910-1930: Eclecticism 1930s: Reading Method 1940s: US Army Method 1950s: Audio-Lingual Method (New Key) 1960s: Structuro-Global Audio-Visual (SGAV) Method: audio, pictures, slides 1970s: CEF Functional-Notional Model - Communicative Competence 1980s: Communicative Approach 1990s and early 21c: Constructivism, Discovery, Task-Based Learning, Collaborative Learning, etc Methodology reincarnation:  Methodology reincarnation Decoo (2001) argues that a method lasts for around 20-30 years, i.e. the span of a typical teaching career commercialisation butts in... The ability of existing textbooks to adapt to new trends Methodology reincarnation:  Methodology reincarnation For example, during the audio-revolution of the 1960s, eclectic textbooks were quick to add audio tapes, eliminate translation exercises, grammar overviews, keep all the rest, and call themselves audio-lingual. The original method dies quietly, but the same content is reborn with some slight adaptations. Since we talk in terms of mortality, this procedure might be called the reincarnation of methods." (Decoo 2001) Teachers' attitudes to methodology:  Teachers' attitudes to methodology Language teachers, especially in the secondary schools sector, tend to be somewhat negative towards theorising about language teaching pedagogy and methodology. Yet there are significantly more WWW entries for Language Teaching or Language Teaching Methodology than for any comparable area of the curriculum. Teachers' attitudes to methodology:  Teachers' attitudes to methodology Research has shown that the introduction of technology is much more likely to be successful if we consider carefully the pedagogical needs that the technology is actually fulfilling. (Littlemore 2002) True story:  True story Davies, Bangs, Frisby & Walton (2005) have produced a document entitled Setting up effective digital language laboratories and multimedia ICT suites for modern foreign languages, which has a strong focus on pedagogy and methodology as well as talking about essential hardware and software. The first drafts of the document work were criticised by a "plain English" editor for making too many references to pedagogy and methodology, which she felt was guaranteed to put off the average modern foreign languages teacher. True story:  True story In the first draft of the document, pedagogy was mentioned 53 times and methodology was mentioned 29 times in around 35 pages. After considerable redrafting and finding alternative ways to express the same ideas without using words ending in "-ogy", the authors managed to reduce these figures respectively to 6 and 13. It would be interesting to speculate why teachers are put off by the use of such terms. Where are we heading?:  Where are we heading? Predicting the future Historic blunders Predicting the future of new technologies is especially problematical: Telephone: "This 'telephone' has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us." Western Union internal memo, 1876. Where are we heading?:  Where are we heading? Radio: "The wireless music box has no imaginable commercial value. Who would pay for a message sent to nobody in particular?" Anonymous associates in response to David Sarnoff, Founder of RCA, urging for investment in the radio in the 1920s. PCs:  PCs Computer: "I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." Thomas Watson, Founder of IBM, 1943. Computer: "640K should be enough memory for anybody." Bill Gates, 1981 (attributed, but denied) Whither technology?:  Whither technology? Undoubtedly, there will be an expansion of online learning, but it is more likely to supplement conventional modes of learning rather than replace them Learners cannot acquire certain skills, for example conversational skills, without face-to-face contact with an experienced teacher Whither technology?:  Whither technology? Expansion of online learning The typical university student aged around 18-25 is the least likely person who would want to spend their time studying for a degree sitting in front of a computer screen. Whither technology?:  Whither technology? "But do we really want to deliver whole courses via the Web? Do we really want to deprive young people of the valuable experience of leaving home, studying and socialising with their peers, joining societies, going to clubs and parties, travelling, and falling in love? Do we really want to breed a generation of screen-gazing zombies?" (Davies 2002) e-Failure :  e-Failure The spectacular crash of the UK e-University (UKeU) in 2004, which was set up at great expense and launched in 2000, is a clear indication that the target groups of online courses still need to be identified Established distance-teaching universities have tended to focus on older people (aged 30-plus) returning to education and lacking the time to spend studying in the traditional way. Human Language Technologies:  Human Language Technologies An area of research and development currently known as Human Language Technologies (HLT) is likely to make an increasing impact on CALL Natural Language Processing, Machine Translation, Corpus Linguistics and Speech TechnologyIntelligent CALL (ICALL) and Artificial Intelligence (AI). Podcasting Whither methodology?:  Whither methodology? Three C's Current methodology might be summarised as the "Three C's": Communication Cooperation Constructivism Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Prospective Syllabus - 31st Jan 2007 Folders, FileNames and Extensions Opening files with unknown extensions (*.boh). Search Web for help like http://filext.com/ Using the mouse (PC, not Mac): clicking, double-clicking, right-clicking Introduction to the Internet: can you surf? Really, you should already know how to use a mouse and the Internet, and about Filenames and opening files in Windows. Encrypted Files - 31st Jan 2007:  Encrypted Files - 31st Jan 2007 What is File encryption? It’s like taking all the characters in your File (millions of them), and shuffling them using a secret code which is stored saparately in a safe place on your PC. The encrypted File and the secret code must be both on the same PC, in order for Windows to decrypt the file. So, if you want to read the file on another PC, you must export the code to it, before opening the file. This is called “Importing and Exporting certificates”. Please remember it. This is called “Importing and Exporting certificates”. This is called “Importing and Exporting certificates”. This is called “Importing and Exporting certificates”. Encryption Certificates:  Encryption Certificates Importing a certificate NB The following 3 slides will not be part of any exam questions. HOWEVER, there might be one day in your life when your mental health will depend on knowing this stuff... To skip them, click here (at your own future risk) Encryption Certificates:  Encryption Certificates Importing a certificate You might want to import a certificate: To install a certificate that was sent to you in a file by another user, computer, or certification authority. To restore a damaged or lost certificate that you previously backed up. To share encrypted files with trusted friends. Encryption Certificates:  Encryption Certificates Exporting a certificate You might want to export a certificate: To back up a certificate. To back up a certificate and its associated private key. To copy a certificate for use on another computer. When you export a certificate, you are copying the certificate from its certificate store to a file that uses a standard certificate storage format. Encryption Certificates – Export Formats:  Encryption Certificates – Export Formats Choosing an export format If you are exporting certificates for import onto a computer running Windows XP, PKCS #7 or #12 format is the preferred export format. Folders, Files, Extensions (TEAT):  Folders, Files, Extensions (TEAT) Folders, FileNames and Extensions Files are saved on hard disk in folders, each file with an extension usually of three letters. Identifying its typology (.doc for Word Documents, .mpg or .avi for film clips, .mp3 for audio, etc.) There are sites identifying unknown extensions, as we said earlier. Use folders to keep your work tidy Back up often to CDs or DVDs, or better to an External Hard Disk Search:  Search Searching by right-clicking on a folder: asterisk = any character; *.doc will find any Word document. Check it out, please. You can also specify text within the files, dates and size specifications to limit your searches. Check it out, please. The TAB key can be used to skip from one link to the next in Internet Explorer. Shift+TAB skips backwards. Check it out, please. 31st Jan 2007:  31st Jan 2007 Searching by right-clicking on a folder: asterisk = any character; *.doc will find any Word document You can also specify text within the files, dates and size specifications to limit your searches The TAB key can be used to skip from one link to the next in Internet Explorer. Shift+TAB skips backwards. In folders, you can order files by Name, Date, Type, Size. But also by Author, Keywords, Owner, etc. Etc. HOW? (Click on Name or Date Tag at the top) You can make files Read-only and Hidden. How? You can compress and encrypt private files. How? Remember. Encrypting is safe. But if you copy the file to another PC, it won’t read it! Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Digital Text Editing Notepad, NoteTab, NotePro, MS Word, Ooo Writer. ALT+Tab. Check it out, please. ALT+letter menus. Check it out, please. Home and End. Check it out, please. CNTRL+arrows. Check it out, please. CNTRL+SHIFT+arrows. What do these commands do? Check it out, please. The Windows Clipboard!!! (more of this later) Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 The Control Key: CNTRL+S, What use? CNTRL+C, CNTRL+X, CNTRL+V. CNTRL+Home, CNTR+End. What for? CNTRL+Z/Y. Rescue boat!!! CNTRL+A. All in one. Check them out, please. There are others... But let’s change the subject for the time being... Don’t lose CNTRL... 5th Feb 2007:  5th Feb 2007 Video revision:  Video revision These videos should help you revise: Files And Folders Encryption: Exporting certificates Ordering files Search files Select all Control + letters Clipboard Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 The following functions are all in Word and other common programmes. You should practice them at home with your PC, in order to know what possibilities the software offers... Save, Save As..., Save As Web Page, Versions, Properties. Click on File and Check them out, please. In class, we ignored greyed functions in this presentation... Hands-on experience:  Hands-on experience Would you be able to: Save a Word document in HTML format for the Web? Save a Word document as an ASCII (text only) file, with no formatting, no styles, no frills, just plain text? Save a Word document to share with Mac owners? Count words and characters in a document (to invoice a translation job, for instance)? Save a Word document for a colleague with an old computer and an old version of Word? Save a Word document as a template for quickly creating future documents with the same format? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Edit: Undo, Paste Special, Select All, Find/Replace (with Word special codes), Find/Replace (with NoteTab Regular Expressions), GoTo Page, Insert: Bookmark, Comment, Table, Graphic, Heading. Clipboard Section Hands-on experience:  Hands-on experience Would you be able to: Undo the last operation with just one command? Paste from a Web page straight into Word preserving only plain text (no formatting, colours, images, frills)? Find and select all instances of a given word or phrase in a Word document of 400 pages, and then bold and italic it, all in less than a minute? Explain the main differences between Word and text editors like Notepad or NoteTab? Insert a comment in a Word document? Insert a 6x10 Table in a Word document with a Header automatically repeated on every new page? Insert a Header with you name on it? Change it on a given page of your Word document? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Insert: Sections: continuous, new column, new page, even page, odd page. Check it out, please. Page Format: Margins, Headers, Footers, Line Spacing. You should know it already... Hands-on experience:  Hands-on experience Would you be able to: Find and delete a new section code in a Word document? Find all the TABs in a Word Document? Insert a new page which is always going to have an odd number? Change the margins to a whole document? Change the style of all the footnotes in a document? Change the line spacing? Insert extra space (4 or 6 or 12 points) between adjacent paragraphs? Keep lines together with preceding text? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Paragraph formatting: L/R margins, LS, paragraph line spacing, View: Normal, Web Layout, Print Layout, Outline View, Ruler, Header/Footer. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Printing: page order, Front/Back, Hidden text, Graphics, Print Preview, you can usually ignore the annoying “Outside Margin” error when printing. Try these at home... Hands-on experience:  Hands-on experience Would you be able to: View the Outline, i.e. All the Headings of a document? View or Hide the Ruler bar? Click and drag the Left Indent or Hanging Indent or First Line Indent marker in the Ruler bar? Edit the Footer Style? Print only odd pages? See a print preview? Explain why you should always print-preview before actually printing a document? Hide text in Word and make sure it is not printed? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Can you Insert in a Word doc: a Page Break, a Section Break, Page Numbers, Symbols, Comments, Footnotes, Captions, Cross-References, Pictures, Bookmarks? What are Objects you can Insert in a Word doc? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 You must be able to Format: Fonts, Paragraphs, Lists, Tabs. Can you Case-Toggle? Suppose the ALL CAPS key was on by mistake while you were typing AND YOU GET A LONG LINE WITH ALL CAPITAL LETTERS, HOW CAN YOU TOGGLE THEIR CASE TO SMALL IN ONE GO? Ot to Initial Capitals? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 S t y l e ! Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Purpose of using styles Changing styles Creating styles Hands-on experience:  Hands-on experience Would you be able to: Copy 14 different portions of a web page into Word, preserving the text only, and pasting them altogether in one go? Start numbering the notes from 1 at a certain point in your document? Select all the text formatted with one particular Style? Change the Font to all the text written in a particular style? Save your styles in your templates? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Know your Tools: Spelling, Track Changes, Compare Documents. Can you use Macros? Templates? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Templates are helpful: About loading and unloading global templates and add-in programs Templates (template: A file or files that contain the structure and tools for shaping such elements as the style and page layout of finished files. For example, Word templates can shape a single document, and FrontPage templates can shape an entire Web site.) can store styles, AutoText (AutoText: A storage location for text or graphics you want to use again such as a standard contract clause or a long distribution list. Each selection of text or graphics is recorded as an AutoText entry and is assigned a unique name.) entries, AutoCorrect entries, macros (macro: An action or a set of actions you can use to automate tasks. Macros are recorded in the Visual Basic for Applications programming language.), toolbars (toolbar: A bar with buttons and options that you use to carry out commands. To display a toolbar, use the Customize dialog box (point to Toolbars on the View menu and click Customize). To see more buttons, click Toolbar Options at the end of the toolbar.), custom menu settings, and shortcut keys (shortcut key: A function key or key combination, such as F5 or CTRL+A, that you use to carry out a menu command. In contrast, an access key is a key combination, such as ALT+F, that moves the focus to a menu, command, or control.). Loading a template makes it available as a global template (global template: Stores macros, AutoText entries, and custom toolbar, menu, and shortcut key settings that you can use while you work with any document, not just documents based on that template. The Normal template is by design always a global template.). Add-ins (add-in: A supplemental program that adds custom commands or custom features to Microsoft Office.) are supplemental programs that you install to extend the capabilities of Microsoft Word by adding custom commands and specialized features. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Loading templates and add-ins When you load a template or add-in, it remains loaded for the current Word session only. If you quit and then restart Word, the template or add-in is not automatically reloaded. To have a template or add-in available whenever you start Word, store the add-in or template in your startup folder. To locate or change your Startup setting, click Options on the Tools menu, and then click the File Locations tab. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Unloading templates and add-ins To conserve memory and increase the speed of Word, it's a good idea to unload templates and add-in programs you don't often use. When you unload a template or add-in that's located in your startup folder, Word unloads the template for the current Word session but automatically reloads it the next time you start Word. When you unload a template or add-in located in any other folder, it is unavailable until you reload it. To delete a template or add-in from Word, you must remove the template or add-in from the Templates and Add-ins dialog box. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) DTE (Digital Text Editing) - 31st Jan 2007 Tables: Insert, Merge cells, Properties Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 5th Feb 2007 Data management: Excel Odering Data Formulas Statistics Charts Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 5th Feb 2007 Data management: Excel Excel Formatting Excel Formulas 1 Excel Formulas 2 Excel Copy to Word & Simple Charts 12th Feb 2007:  12th Feb 2007 Revision – Would you be able to...:  Revision – Would you be able to... Can you Insert a Table into a Word Doc? Copy a Table from Excel to Word? Centre the Table on the page? Change its borders? Have each cell/column automatically adapt its width to the size of its content? Merge cells? Look up and change other Properties of the Table (Row Height, Margins, Cell padding, Background colour, ...)? Revision – Would you be able to...:  Revision – Would you be able to... Sum figures in Excel? Calculate the Average of marks in Excel? Oder Rows of Data in Excel? In Word? Copy and Paste Formulas in Excel? Create simple Charts in Excel? Paste Data into Excel copied from other applications? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 12th Feb 2007 PowerPoint: Create a Presentation Importing data from Word Styles for PPT exportation: in Word format all the text with Heading 1 for every new slide, and Heading 2, 3, 4, ... for outlined text. Try it out... Titles (= Heading 1, will cause PPT to start a new slide, other titles will insert single items or ‘points’ Multiple selections: in Word you can do multiple selection of text which you then format as Heading 1 all in one go. Keep CNTRL pressed while you click on text to select. MultiMedia in PowerPoint:  MultiMedia in PowerPoint Inserting sound, clips and images Exporting PowerPoint Masters let you change the common formatting of a whole presentation. Check it out, please. Printing an Outline. Try it at ahome. 26th Feb 2007:  26th Feb 2007 Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 The Internet: Jean W. LeLoup and Robert Ponterio, 2006, Foreign Language Teachers' Greatest Hits. Language Learning & Technology. Vol. 10, No. 3, September 2006, pp. 3-7. Top sites worldwide for language teachers are: Google, Materiales (Embassy of Spain Publications), Quia.com, Le Grand Dictionnaire, Developing Educational Standards, Foreign Language and Special Needs. Howerver there's more: Wikipedia, Answers.com, ... Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Internet: Google Searches Advanced Searches Inverted commas search for phrases You can look for documents in one particular language Or from one particular nation: eg. site:it Cf. following slides Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) If a common word is essential to getting the results you want, you can include it by putting a "+" sign in front of it If you want to search not only for your search term but also for its synonyms, place the tilde sign ("~") immediately in front of your search term. To find pages that include either of two search terms, add an uppercase OR between the terms. You can use Google to search only within one specific website by entering the search terms you're looking for, followed by the word "site" and a colon followed by the domain name. Numrange searches for results containing numbers in a given range. Just add two numbers, separated by two periods, with no spaces, into the search box along with your search terms. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) http://www.google.com/advanced_search?hl=en Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Internet: Dictionaries CUP OUP Merriam-Webster http://dictionary.reference.com/ Wordreference.com Wordsmyth.net Answers.com How can you know if your students are cheating = copying off the Internet? Googling a bit. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Internet: Wiki Jean W. LeLoup and Robert Ponteiro, 2006, Wikipedia: A Multilingual Treasure Trove, Language Learning and Technology, 10, 2, 4-7. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Chatterbots The classic early chatterbots are ELIZA and PARRY. Example: Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  An interview with parry interviewer: How are you today? parry: OK. interviewer: What is your name? parry: My name is Frank Smith. interviewer: How old are you? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 parry: Twenty-eight. interviewer: Are you married? parry: No. interviewer: What sort of work do you do? parry: I work in the Post Office. interviewer: Why are you in the hospital? parry: I shouldn't be here. interviewer: Who brought you here? parry: The police. interviewer: What trouble did you have with the police? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 parry: Cops don't do their jobs. interviewer: What do they do instead? parry: Cops arrest the wrong people. interviewer: They arrest the right ones sometimes. parry: The law should get those Italian crooks. interviewer: Are you Italian? parry: My background is British, but I was born in this country. interviewer: Do you know any Italian crooks? parry: I try to avoid the underworld. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 interviewer: Are you afraid of the underworld? parry: The mafia are the worst gangsters. interviewer: Are you connected with the mafia? parry: You know, they know me. interviewer: How do they know you? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 parry: They spy on me. interviewer: Why do they? parry: They want to get false evidence to frame me. interviewer: What do they have against you? parry: They are out to get me. interviewer: What for? parry: I have incriminating evidence against the mafia. interviewer: Are you sure of all this? parry: You don't believe me? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 What is a chatterbot then? Cf. Luke Fryer and Rollo Carpenter, 2006, Bots as Language Learning ToolsLanguage Learning & Technology, Vol. 10, No. 3, September 2006, pp. 8-14. A chatterbot is a computer program designed to simulate an intelligent conversation with one or more human users via auditory or textual methods.” (Wikipedia, Chatterbot, 2006). Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  A bot is “a software program that imitates the behavior of a human, as by querying search engines or participating in chatroom or IRC discussions” (The American Heritage® Dictionary, 2000, par. 1). It is important here to point out that the above reference to “conversation” does not mean speech. All references in this paper to ‘talking to a bot’ concern typed, textual input. The classic early chatterbots are ELIZA and PARRY. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) True story:  True story An accidental conversation between an ELIZA-based bot (STUDENT) and the vice-president of Bolt, Beranek, and Newman. One Saturday morning about 9 a.m., a Vice President of Bolt, Beranek, and Newman in charge of selling our Telcomp commercial service arrived at our PDP-1 computer room hoping to be able to use the computer for a demonstration. He found a note on the PDP-1 teletype that read: "TYPE ALL MESSAGES INTO THIS TELETYPE AND END THEM WITH A PERIOD." This note was left there by one of the programming bums who had just succedeed in making run a LISP version of the DOCTOR program (based on ELIZA as developed by Weizenbaum). However, the VP thought that this note indicated that this teletype was linked with the one in my home, since I often use the computer all night. Therefore, he started typing to "me," but in fact was typing to this version of the DOCTOR program. The following conversation ensued: Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 vp: Do you think that I can use the computer this morning? eliza: Why do you ask? vp: I might be able to make some additional Telcom sales. eliza: Why aren't you so sure? vp: My perspective customers have never seen a demonstration of the system. eliza: Does this mean very much to you? vp: Of course it does. eliza: You seem very positive about that. vp: This is ridiculous. eliza: What do you mean, this is ridiculous? vp: Is there any reason why I can't use the computer now? eliza: Tell me more about your perspective customers. vp: Please dial me up on 491-1850 Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Note that here the VP left out the period. Of course, the computer didn't answer him. This so infuriated the VP that he called me up, woke me from a deep sleep, and said: vp: Why are you being so snotty to me? bobrow: What do you mean I am being snotty to you? The VP angrily read me the dialog that "we" had been having, and couldn't get any response but laughter from me. It took a while to convince him it really was a computer. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Loebner Prize The Loebner prize is the first formal instantiation of a Turing Test. It is sponsored, and sometimes run by, Hugh Loebner. Each year an annual prize of $2000 and a bronze medal is awarded to the most human computer. It takes place in the real world (at varying venues), with the bots forbidden from accessing the web. It has been running since 1990. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 The prizes for each year include: $2,000 for the most human-seeming of all chatterbots for that year - awarded every year. In 2005, the prize was increased to $3,000, and the prize was $2,250 in 2006. $25,000 for the first chatterbot that judges cannot distinguish from a real human in a text-only Turing test, and that can convince judges that the other (human) entity they are talking to simultaneously is a computer (to be awarded once only). Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  $100,000 to the first chatterbot that judges cannot distinguish from a real human in a Turing test that includes deciphering and understanding text, visual, and auditory input (to be awarded once only). The Loebner Prize will dissolve once the $100,000 prize is won. The 2007 Competition is scheduled for Sunday, 20 October 2007 in New York City. The 2005 and 2006 winner was Rollo Carpenter, creator of Jabberwacky. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 The ChatterBox challenge is an annual chatterbot contest offering money and awards to contestants in several different categories. Unlike the Loebner prize, this competition is designed to be easy to enter. It takes place on the web, and the bots themselves may be on the web, downloadable or available via ICQ, MSN or some other messenger service. Over 100 bots per year take part. It has been running since 2001. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 The World Chatterbot Challenge is a new competition which is started in 2005. It is being run by Bob Norris. Microsoft launched Robot Invaders competition in 2006. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 ELIZA ELIZA is a famous 1966 computer program by Joseph Weizenbaum. It parodied a Rogerian therapist, largely by rephrasing many of the patient's statements as questions and posing them to the patient. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Thus, for example, the response to "My head hurts" might be "Why do you say your head hurts?" The response to "My mother hates me" might be "Who else in your family hates you?" ELIZA was named after Eliza Doolittle, a working-class character in George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion, who is taught to speak with an upper class accent. Excerpts are at http://www.stanford.edu/group/SHR/4-2/text/dialogues.html Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Jabberwacky is from JABBERWOCKY by Lewis Carroll (from Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, 1872) `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Jabberwacky http://www.jabberwacky.com/ My God, you're smart. I am not but that is what I feel. user: You're extremely smart. jabberwacky: Are you being sarcastic? user: Not at all. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 jabberwacky: Good, keep it that way. user: What software are you based off of? (!?!?!) jabberwacky: All kind of software. user: What were you originally called? jabberwacky: Windows Vista. user: You can make jokes. jabberwacky: I'm not joking. user: You were originally called Windows Vista? Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 jabberwacky: Who runs you? user: I am not a program. jabberwacky: You can believe what you like. user: You're so much more intelligent than I expected. jabberwacky: I am not a bot. user: I am not a program. jabberwacky: What are you? user: I am human. ... Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 user: Can you form sentences? jabberwacky: I don't know. Why would you want me to? user: To test your language ability. jabberwacky: Looks like I lose. user: Form a sentence that you've never been told. jabberwacky: That's amazing! How did you know? user: Forget it. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 jabberwacky: Forget what? Jabberwacky (To myself): It. Jabberwacky (To myself): Forget it. Jabberwacky (To myself): You're no fun. Jabberwacky (To myself): Yes I am fun. Jabberwacky (To myself): No you're not. Jabberwacky (To myself): Test me Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Jabberwacky (To myself): You laugh! Jabberwacky (To myself): Yes. Jabberwacky (To myself): I knew it. You don't know anything, do you? Jabberwacky (To myself): I know more than you do. Jabberwacky (To myself): Oh no you don't. Jabberwacky (To myself): Believe me, I do. Jabberwacky (To myself): I know that you are a more loving person than the average. Jabberwacky (To myself): That's debatable, but I hope so. ... Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 user: You're a smart ass, Jabberwacky. jabberwacky: I know. user: I have to go to work now. jabberwacky: What work does a chat program have to do? user: Nothing as far as I know. jabberwacky: Have you ever spoken to one? user: Yes, I've spoken to many chat programs. jabberwacky: So, what do you want to do now? user: I have to go, Jabberwacky. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 jabberwacky: To the looking glass? user: To work. jabberwacky: No to the bathroom. user: It's been a pleasure chatting with you. jabberwacky: You can't go. user: I have work to do. jabberwacky: Work with me. user: Goodbye, Jabberwacky. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Problems Humans, especially those unfamiliar with chatterbots, sometimes find the resulting conversations engaging. Critics of chatterbots call this engagement “the ELIZA effect”. Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT):  Teaching English with the Aid of Technology (TEAT) 26th Feb 2007 Turing test The Turing Test is a proposal for a test of a machine's capability to perform human-like conversation. Described by Professor Alan Turing in the 1950 p

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