Teaching Upper Elementary PE

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Information about Teaching Upper Elementary PE
Education

Published on June 17, 2009

Author: helenabaert

Source: slideshare.net

“ WILL WE PLAY GAMES TODAY?” PRESENTATION FOR ELEMENTARY PE CLASS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Teaching Upper Elementary PE

Activity #1 Think back of your time in PE Think of being in upper elementary / middle (Grade 4 and up) Describe what a normal PE lesson would entail How would the teacher begin? Describe a lesson from start to finish

Think back of your time in PE

Think of being in upper elementary / middle (Grade 4 and up)

Describe what a normal PE lesson would entail

How would the teacher begin?

Describe a lesson from start to finish

Teaching and Learning of Game Play in PE

Why it is taught? (philosophical and historical perspectives) Technical model (behaviorist) TGfU model (constructivist) Culture Factory/Product Model Progressive Education Belief System Dualism: separation of mind and body Integration of Mind, Body and Spirit Context Isolation; links with coaching and professional sports Integration of school and community Training Efficiency / military influence Movement Education Experience Specialism / Sport Integration and inclusivity

What is taught (Curriculum) Technical model (behaviorist) TGfU model (constructivist) Purpose Acquisition of knowledge Construction of meaning Objective Defining what we know Discovering what we don’t know and applying what we know Outcome Performance Thinking and Decision Making Game Frameworks Seasonal Activities Classification

How it is taught (Pedagogy) Technical model (behaviorist) TGfU model (constructivist) Instruction Teacher Centered Student Centered Strategy Part-Whole Whole-Part-Whole Content Techniques Based Concepts Based Context Teacher-student interaction Multidimensional Interaction Teacher Role Transmission of Information Facilitation of problem solving Learner Role Passive Learning Active Learning Evaluation Mastery Demonstration of understanding and contributions to process

History of TGfU Developed in the early 1980’s in UK. David Bunker and Rod Thorpe noticed that when students left school they knew little about how to play games because they had to use their decision-making skills. Students were also having difficulty transferring previously learned skills over to game situations. This resulted from the focus on learning technical skills in physical education classes with little to no emphasis on strategy and game sense. n 1982 Bunker and Thorpe introduced their model for teaching games.

Developed in the early 1980’s in UK.

David Bunker and Rod Thorpe noticed that when students left school they knew little about how to play games because they had to use their decision-making skills.

Students were also having difficulty transferring previously learned skills over to game situations.

This resulted from the focus on learning technical skills in physical education classes with little to no emphasis on strategy and game sense.

n 1982 Bunker and Thorpe introduced their model for teaching games.

The premise Use only “modified” games (small sided games, 3 on 3, …) Ask questions to build problem solving and critical thinking skills Start with game tactics before skills Student Centered Approach Developmentally Appropriate Games Maximum Motto still stands!

Use only “modified” games (small sided games, 3 on 3, …)

Ask questions to build problem solving and critical thinking skills

Start with game tactics before skills

Student Centered Approach

Developmentally Appropriate Games

Maximum Motto still stands!

Activity # 2 Categorize the following games

Categorize the following games

TGfU Classification of Games Different games can be grouped together because they contain a similar structure. (Ellis, 1983) Bunker and Thorpe (1982) categorized games of similar intents into the following headings: Invasion/Territory Net/Wall Striking/Fielding Target

Different games can be grouped together because they contain a similar structure. (Ellis, 1983)

Bunker and Thorpe (1982) categorized games of similar intents into the following headings:

Invasion/Territory

Net/Wall

Striking/Fielding

Target

Defining the Games Target – propel an object, with a high degree of accuracy, at a target. Sriking/fielding or run scoring - strike a ball so it eludes defenders Net/Wall – propelling an object into space so an opponent is unable to make a return. Invasion or Territory – to invade an opponent’s territory to score.

Target – propel an object, with a high degree of accuracy, at a target.

Sriking/fielding or run scoring - strike a ball so it eludes defenders

Net/Wall – propelling an object into space so an opponent is unable to make a return.

Invasion or Territory – to invade an opponent’s territory to score.

Classification Of Games

Activity #3 For one appointed category, identify the transferable skills and tactics (offense/defense) between the sports/games

For one appointed category, identify the transferable skills and tactics (offense/defense) between the sports/games

Original TGfU Model (1986)

Steps 1. Game. All students are able to play the game. Margaret Ellis (1986) outlined the benefits and means of “enabling” every child to participate, regardless of skill level, by modifying such things as rules, equipment, playing areas, and group size. 2. Game appreciation . Students learn to understand and respect the necessity of rules because they create, implement, and refine them. 3. Tactical awareness . Students come to know and understand the game through solving problems as they are presented in game situations.

1. Game. All students are able to play the game. Margaret Ellis (1986) outlined the benefits and means of “enabling” every child to participate, regardless of skill level, by modifying such things as rules, equipment, playing areas, and group size.

2. Game appreciation . Students learn to understand and respect the necessity of rules because they create, implement, and refine them.

3. Tactical awareness . Students come to know and understand the game through solving problems as they are presented in game situations.

4. Decision making . Students learn to make good decisions by practicing the elements of decision making. These elements include paying attention to relevant actions (selective attention), anticipating responses by opponents, and choosing appropriate skills (those that will implement the decision most effectively). 5. Skill execution . Students are motivated to learn skills because they are learned in context and practiced after the game is played. The skills then enhance game play performance and help students implement the chosen strategy. 6. Performance . The level of student performance increases as the cycle continues.

4. Decision making . Students learn to make good decisions by practicing the elements of decision making. These elements include paying attention to relevant actions (selective attention), anticipating responses by opponents, and choosing appropriate skills (those that will implement the decision most effectively).

5. Skill execution . Students are motivated to learn skills because they are learned in context and practiced after the game is played. The skills then enhance game play performance and help students implement the chosen strategy.

6. Performance . The level of student performance increases as the cycle continues.

Activity #4 Asking Questions: Using the grid games, play the game and come up with a tactical oriented question

Asking Questions:

Using the grid games, play the game and come up with a tactical oriented question

Questions that should be asked/answered while learning with the TGfU Model Skill and movement execution - "How do you ...?" Tactical awareness - "What did you ...?" How can you…? When should you…? Where should you…? Example: let’s think of a game ….

Skill and movement execution - "How do you ...?"

Tactical awareness - "What did you ...?" How can you…? When should you…? Where should you…?

Example: let’s think of a game ….

Pedagogical Principles Sampling – Transferable skills/tactics. Game Representation – Creating developmentally appropriate game-like situations to demonstrate how to use a certain skill in a game. Simplification – Modifying games to enhance success rate Exaggeration – Modifying games to teach certain concepts. Modification - Increase or decrease the complexity of any game. All modification should be used to adjust the game play to meet the needs of the students Tactical Complexity - This point demonstrates that there should be developmental progression of tactical solutions.

Sampling – Transferable skills/tactics.

Game Representation – Creating developmentally appropriate game-like situations to demonstrate how to use a certain skill in a game.

Simplification – Modifying games to enhance success rate

Exaggeration – Modifying games to teach certain concepts.

Modification - Increase or decrease the complexity of any game. All modification should be used to adjust the game play to meet the needs of the students

Tactical Complexity - This point demonstrates that there should be developmental progression of tactical solutions.

Homework Think of a game/sport Create a modified game for grade 5 How is it representative to the real game? Think of a tactical focus in that game Think of a skill one needs to be successful in the game Think of a simplification you can make to enhance success rate Think of an exaggeration you can make to teach the tactical concept Think of 2 modifications to increase (1) and decrease (1) the complexity of the game.

Think of a game/sport

Create a modified game for grade 5

How is it representative to the real game?

Think of a tactical focus in that game

Think of a skill one needs to be successful in the game

Think of a simplification you can make to enhance success rate

Think of an exaggeration you can make to teach the tactical concept

Think of 2 modifications to increase (1) and decrease (1) the complexity of the game.

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