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Tammy Erickson--Changing Workforce

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Information about Tammy Erickson--Changing Workforce
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Published on December 17, 2008

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Engaging Both Heart and Mind: The Coming Crisis of the Changing Workforce : Engaging Both Heart and Mind: The Coming Crisis of the Changing Workforce Tamara J. Erickson September 30, 2005 What Are Your Customers Asking for Today? : What Are Your Customers Asking for Today? Customized Products Negotiated Prices Flexible Places Targeted Promotion A Differentiated and Memorable Customer Experience Why Would Your Employees Want Anything Less? : Why Would Your Employees Want Anything Less? Customized Products Negotiated Prices Flexible Places Targeted Promotion A Differentiated and Memorable Customer Experience Employee Customized Construct Negotiated Compensation Flexible Connection Targeted Communication Fair . . . but not necessarily equal Slide 4: Source: Employment Policy Foundation analysis and projections of Census/BLS and BEA data. Millions of People Expected Labor Force and Labor Force Demand A Growing Shortage of Workers in the US: Palpable by the End of This Decade A Flat or Shrinking Native Populationin Almost All Industrialized Countries : A Flat or Shrinking Native Populationin Almost All Industrialized Countries Source: Census Bureau, 2000 Percentage Change in Population Percentage Change in the Working Population 2000-2050 Dramatically Different Patterns of Growth by Age : Age of Workers Percent Growth in U.S. Population by Age: 2000-2010 Dramatically Different Patterns of Growth by Age 1. Declining number of mid-career workers 2. Few younger workers entering 3. Rapid growth in the over-55 workforce Source: US Census Bureau International Data Base . . . Continuing for Our Working Lives! : . . . Continuing for Our Working Lives! Age of Workers Percent Growth in U.S. Workforce by Age: 2000-2020 Source: US Census Bureau International Data Base A Pattern Found ‘Round the Industrialized World : A Pattern Found ‘Round the Industrialized World Source: Demography is De$tiny, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2003 In 2000, A Fairly “Young” World . . . : In 2000, A Fairly “Young” World . . . Source: U.S. Census Bureau Percent of Population Age 60+ 2000 . . . Rapidly Aging by 2025 : . . . Rapidly Aging by 2025 Source: U.S. Census Bureau Percent of Population Age 60+ 2025 :  Why? Dramatic Increase in Life Expectancy 1900 1950 1970 1980 1990 2000 1910 1920 1930 1940 1960 75 70 65 60 55 50 45 40 80 Source: U.S. Social Security Administration Average Life Expectancy at Birth in the U.S. The “Sudden” Boom in Life Expectancy : The “Sudden” Boom in Life Expectancy Source: Census Bureau, 2000 Life Expectancy at Birth: 1000 - 2000 Age Why? Dramatic Drop in Birth Rates : Why? Dramatic Drop in Birth Rates Source: Age Wave Total Fertility Rate Total Fertility Rate Why? The Baby Boom Pattern : Why? The Baby Boom Pattern Source: U.S. Census 4.5 4.0 3.5 3.0 2.5 2.0 Birth in Millions The Boom Years: 1946-1964 The Three Big UnknownsAbout The Emerging Workforce : The Three Big UnknownsAbout The Emerging Workforce Source: Demography is De$tiny, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2003 This Century’s Workforce Poses Many Challenges Impacting Your Ability to Attract, Retain, and Motivate the Talent You Need : This Century’s Workforce Poses Many Challenges Impacting Your Ability to Attract, Retain, and Motivate the Talent You Need Limited in availability – Growing in the U.S. by only a fraction of a percent per year through the first half of this century Chronologically older – Individuals over 55 progressively larger proportions of the workforce: 11% in 2000; 20% in 2015; nearly one-third by 2050 Lacking key skills – Shortages of needed talent, particularly in high skill areas, such as science and engineering disciplines Global – Continuing growth in off-shoring and “right shoring” Highly diverse – Diverse in virtually every conventional dimension – race, gender, age, religion and cultural identity – and populated by individuals with widely differing values and assumptions about work itself Sharing only health as a core value – Unified in the U.S. only by a desire for premium health care benefits – heightened by increasing “age” Source: Testimony by Tamara J. Erickson to the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, May 2005 Complicated by the Changing Nature of WorkFurther Challenging Big Corporations’ Response : Complicated by the Changing Nature of WorkFurther Challenging Big Corporations’ Response Conducive to small firms – Competitive, and already doing a much better job on engagement – averaging 2 ½ times higher engagement than large corporations (32% versus 13%), although large employers spend and offer significantly more Virtual – Technology-enabled and increasingly comfortable for workers who are accustomed to interacting through technology Based on experimentation and coordination – “Try it” becoming easier than planning; coordination increasingly “free,” ubiquitous and instant Difficult to standardize – Fundamentally different patterns of learning – pulling information from a variety of sources, not linear learning from authoritative sources Linked by technology – personal technology – “Owned” by young workers and as integral to their personal being as wallets were to their parents’ Democratic and/or market-based – Decision-making enabled by new technology and encouraged by employee preferences Source: Testimony by Tamara J. Erickson to the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, May 2005 Not a Time of Quick Reactions to Clear, Urgent Signals . . . : Not a Time of Quick Reactions to Clear, Urgent Signals . . . . . . But One of Potentially Dangerous Acceptance of Slow-Moving Trends Source: Demography is De$tiny, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2003 More Years Spent in “Retirement” : 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 More Years Spent in “Retirement” 13.6 19.4 20-25 1.2 Years Source: Age Wave, based on U.S. data The Opportunity for a New Life Stage : The Opportunity for a New Life Stage Twenty-plus years: post- “Empty Nest” and pre- “Old Age” Unprecedented opportunity For satisfaction For exploration and creation For productivity Reinventing Entrepreneurial Charitable Flexible Potential for rejuvenation of the economy? Productive Adulthood? Reap Rewards? Deploy Human Capital Assets? Source: Demography is De$tiny, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2003 Many Employees Plan Not to Retire… : At what age do you plan to retire? Many Employees Plan Not to Retire… Source: The New Employee/Employer Equation, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004 Traditional Retirement: Plummeting from the Peak of Productivity, Power, and Prestige : Traditional Retirement: Plummeting from the Peak of Productivity, Power, and Prestige 20s 30s 40s 50s or 60s The Shape of Things to Come:“Down Shifting” for Continued Contribution : The Shape of Things to Come:“Down Shifting” for Continued Contribution 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s Career Development Career Deceleration Source: Demography is De$tiny, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2003 Cutting Back Has New Meaning: Cyclic Work : Cutting Back Has New Meaning: Cyclic Work The most popular pattern for working after “retirement” is not part-time, but moving back and forth between periods of working and not working. Source: The New Employee/Employer Equation, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004 Begin Now: Create a New Relationship Between Employees and Employers : Begin Now: Create a New Relationship Between Employees and Employers Retire “retirement” – The average American can expect twenty or more years of active, healthy life after traditional retirement. We need this talent, and must adopt a more flexible view of work to coax more to stay. Create bell-shaped career paths – Individuals must be able to continue to contribute to businesses in respected, although less intense ways, into their 70s, 80s and beyond. Encourage counterintuitive entry points – Allow individuals to begin “entry” level jobs at multiple points throughout their lives, either as a way into new careers or to gain flexible options better suited to a preferred lifestyle. Many individuals will have two and even three distinct careers throughout their lifetime. Design project-based, cyclical work – Already, 49% of U.S. workers who plan to work during traditional retirement years say they prefer periods of full-time work interspersed with periods of no work. Job sharing is key. Accommodate blended lives – Make job sharing and other part-time options widely available Customize work arrangements – Allow flexibility based on individual needs and preferences Source: Testimony by Tamara J. Erickson to the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, May 2005 Corporations must vary how individuals are compensated, managed, and matched with different types of tasks to attract and retain key talent and create higher engagement Shifting Values : Shifting Values Respectful of authority Loyal to institutions Motivated by financial rewards and security Hierarchical Technology as a treat Anti-authoritarian Idealistic Motivated by changing the world Competitive Technology as a tool Self reliant Anti-institution Tribal Information rich Technology as an extension of self Core Values of Mature Workers: Shaped by Stable Teenage Years : Core Values of Mature Workers: Shaped by Stable Teenage Years Character-Shaping Events First manned space flight Successful resolution of the Cuban Missile Crisis Significant increase in economic prosperity: home and TV ownership Growth in white collar jobs Midlife: Reaffirmation of economic success Red sports cars and trophy wives Today’s Dominant Cohort: Pulling Away from Corporate Life : Today’s Dominant Cohort: Pulling Away from Corporate Life Character-Shaping Events Assassinations of idealistic leaders, Kennedy and King Vietnam War, with television coverage and widespread protests Civil Rights movement Watergate and Nixon’s resignation Midlife: Volunteer work and a search for life’s meaning Limited engagement with “work” Lower Organizational Connection Among Mid-Careers : % strongly/moderately agree Lower Organizational Connection Among Mid-Careers . . . And Less Passion and Alignment of Values : % strongly/moderately agree . . . And Less Passion and Alignment of Values What is Engagement? : What is Engagement? Are excited and enthused about what you’re doing Resist distractions Tend to forget about time or place Ponder current challenges even when you’re not directly involved in the activity Invest your free time (discretionary effort ) Identify with the activity Invite others in (emotional contagion) You know you are engaged when you . . . Source: Re.sults Project EMP: Excelling at Employee Engagement, The Concours Group, 2004 Flow as defined by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, former Chairman of the University of Chicago Department of Psychology Why? A Growing Body of Research Links Engagement to Productivity : Productivity Why? A Growing Body of Research Links Engagement to Productivity Enhanced Desirable Discretionary Behaviors Innovation Insight and intuition Originality and inspiration Judgment Humor Collaboration Offered input Leadership Friendship Correlation to Outcomes Higher share price – Fortune “100 Best Companies To Work For” list outperformed the S&P 500 Higher return on assets – Korean firms with higher organizational commitment had a higher return on assets Lower mortality – U.S. hospitals with higher nurse retention have lower mortality Source: Re.sults Project EMP: Excelling at Employee Engagement, The Concours Group, 2004, based on the work of Dr. Jeffrey Pfeffer, Stanford University Improvement in Traditional HR Metrics Retention rates, Acceptance rates Customer Satisfaction Emotional contagion of employees in customer-facing roles Reduced Costs Investments focused only on those aspects of the employee “deal” that matter most How? There Are No Universal “Best Practices” for Enhancing Engagement : Source: Re.sults Project EMP: Excelling at Employee Engagement, The Concours Group, 2004 How? There Are No Universal “Best Practices” for Enhancing Engagement Companies with highly engaged employees each do very different things! But within each, the elements of the employee experience seem to make sense: The individual’s need and values The corporation’s values, as expressed by its leaders The human resource policies and practices The specific roles and tasks The day-to-day work environment: colleagues, first-line managers Significant diversity . . . but somehow internally aligned . . . Slide 34: “Customer satisfaction is the second priority. The first is employee satisfaction.” Chairman and CEO Patrick Flood HomeBanc Mortgage Corporation defines its mission as showing employees how work can give them a sense of purpose and mission Corporate philosophy based on the writings of Robert Greenleaf, an essayist and teacher who defined the "servant-leader" as a person who wants to serve first, before aspiring to leadership Our role is helping “people exchange ordinary living for an extraordinary life. To me, a job is too small to fill up a person’s spirit. I want to help them find purpose in what they do, see the bigger picture of what we’re trying to accomplish as an organization.” Chief People Officer, Dwight Reighard "You have to realize that when your associates are happy, your customers are happy." Barbara Aiken, a vice president in the Office of People and Culture Corporate Activism: Encouraging Employees to Lead Better Lives A Corporate Philosophy Embedded in an Employer Brand Recruiting based on cultural fit, associate emergency fund, extensive training and standards . . . A Better Way Home Slide 35: From its launch in 1999, created a reservations “call center” based entirely in employees’ homes Employees have unlimited shift-trading privileges and participate in self-scheduling and a combination of full and part-time schedules Results: a 30% boost in agent productivity, 38% increase in service levels, and a 50% decrease in manager workload per agent Reservationists “are the people who are the least compensated in the company, but generate its revenue and interface with the customers more than anyone else except the flight attendants. We cannot afford to pay them huge salaries, so let’s make them happier, let’s let them work from their homes. We train them, send them home, and they are happy.” —Founder David Neeleman Clear Choice:Flexibility Rules Calling HomeUsing flexible, at home work arrangements – finding extraordinary levels of engagement Are You Relating to the Meaningful Diversity of the Changing Workforce? : Are You Relating to the Meaningful Diversity of the Changing Workforce? “Fit” – The Challenge of Engagement : Productivity “Fit” – The Challenge of Engagement With what? Segmentation – On what basis? Customization – Of which components? Flexibility – In which dimensions? Searching for Meaningful Differences and Drivers of Engagement : Searching for Meaningful Differences and Drivers of Engagement Measured: Current levels of engagement Psycho-demographic characteristics related to the role of work in respondents’ lives, and Preference for and satisfaction with various “deal” attributes Survey of 7,718 Adult Employees Who Work 30+ Hours per Week Sources Agree: Few Employees Are “Engaged” in Work : 16% 19% 55% 64% 17% 29% Engaged Neutral Bitter Source: The Gallup Organization, Towers Perrin, and The New Employee/Employer Equation, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004 Random samples of the working population in the U.S. over 18 years of age 18% 62% 20% Sources Agree: Few Employees Are “Engaged” in Work Breakthrough Results from EEE : Breakthrough Results from EEE Six very different roles that work plays in our lives – six statistically-valid segments Each segment with distinct work-related preferences – how work is structured, how they are managed, how they are compensated, and so on Correlation between the extent to which the specific segment preferences are met and employee engagement levels Insight into the values and attributes that are most meaningful to each employee segment Beyond measurement – tangible ways to improve engagement Recognizing Meaningful Differences – The Six Segments in Today’s Workforce that Link to Engagement : Self-Empowered Innovators14% Accomplished Contributors 17% Fair & Square Traditionalists 20% Maverick Morphers 15% Stalled Survivors 19% Demanding Disconnects 15% Recognizing Meaningful Differences – The Six Segments in Today’s Workforce that Link to Engagement Work is about building something with lasting value beyond themselves Work is about the American dream – a steady, predictable path to success Work is an opportunity to be a valuable part of a winning team Seek lives filled with change and adventure – work is one of multiple opportunities to achieve these goals Work is a source of livelihood but not yet (or not currently) a very satisfying part of their lives Work is generally frustrating and its value is largely the near-term economic gain Source: The New Employee/Employer Equation, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004 Work is Clearly Not the Same Thing To All People : Work is Clearly Not the Same Thing To All People Not all people are equally well-suited to all types of work Not everyone values the same things from the work experience There is not one definition of a “good” manager It is smart to target employees that are best for your firm and the type of work you need to do Jim Collins: First, get the right people on the bus Old Management Wisdom: Hire for attitude; train for skill Consistency is key: Right segment(s) for your business Fit with your corporate culture, values, and external image Appropriateness for the type of work Alignment of all parts of the employee experience – job design, compensation, management style, and so on In short, a compelling, consistent employee brand Varying Preferences for the Employee/Employer “Deal” : Long-term/Big Picture Benefits or Impact Immediate Benefit or Impact Economic Rewards PsychosocialRewards 5 Fair and Square Traditionalists Retirement savings and pensions Self-Empowered Innovators Work that is worth-while to society Demanding Disconnects Healthcare and salary Accomplished Contributors Cooperation and teamwork Source: The New Employee/Employer Equation, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004 Varying Preferences for the Employee/Employer “Deal” Maverick Morphers Bonus payments and stock options Stalled Survivors Raises and childcare Rank-Ordering of Deal Preferences: Wide Variation : Rank-Ordering of Deal Preferences: Wide Variation Work that enables me to learn and grow Work that is personally stimulating Workplace that is enjoyable Work that is worthwhile to society Flexible work schedule Comprehensive benefits package Comprehensive retirement package Flexible workplace Ten percent more in total compensation Two weeks additional paid vacation Note: BLUE bold indicates that the segment places MORE importance on this element than most other segments do. RED bold italic indicates that the segment places LESS importance on this element than most other segments do. Source: The New Employee/Employer Equation, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004 Comprehensive benefits package Comprehensive retirement package Workplace that is enjoyable Flexible work schedule Ten percent more in total compensation Work that enables me to learn and grow Two weeks additional paid vacation Work that is personally stimulating Work that is worthwhile to society Flexible workplace Self-Empowered Innovators Fair & Square Traditionalists Are You Satisfied with Our Benefits Program? : Are You Satisfied with Our Benefits Program? No . . . But it hardly matters to me. The fundamental work is so important and challenging No . . . And its really stressful for me. The security of my family and our future – making sure we’re covered under every uncertainty – is very important. Preferences for Management Style: No Common Definition of a “Good Manager” : Preferences for Management Style: No Common Definition of a “Good Manager” "Catalyst” Eliminate bureaucracy and remove logistical impediments Offer “stretch” projects Be aware of signs of burnout and over extension “Promote” their work "Accountant” Be clear and up front on expectations; follow through Tie compensation to clear goals Create a path that respects experience and tenure Provide regular professional development Source: The New Employee/Employer Equation, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004 Self-Empowered Innovators Fair & Square Traditionalists Are You Satisfied with Your Manager? : Are You Satisfied with Your Manager? No . . . He drives me crazy with excessive structure and oversight. Yes . . . The communication is frequent and thorough. I appreciate the detailed feedback and regular reviews. Learning and DevelopmentEngagement Differences : Individual Contributor Individual Learner Self- Directed Exploratory Variety & Learning Moments Participation Eager Learner Team Learner Externally Directed Formalized Traditional & Certified Mastery Make Me Learn Source: The New Employee/Employer Equation, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004 Learning and DevelopmentEngagement Differences Employee Preferences Vary Across the “4 C’s” : Employee Preferences Vary Across the “4 C’s” Source: The New Employee/Employer Equation, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004 A Common Condition: 4 C Misalignment! : A Common Condition: 4 C Misalignment! Source: The New Employee/Employer Equation, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004 Slide 51: Plotting Your Journey to Extraordinary Engagement Business Outcomes and Future Workforce Requirements Engagement Levels, Employee Segments and Current Deal Satisfaction External Brand Attributes Transition Plan for Alignment of the 4C’s 1. Context 2. Assessment 3. Design Brand Aspiration and Target Segments’ Experience Organization’s Hidden Logic and Change Readiness The Current Employee Experience: the 4C’s 4. Transition What are the elements of your employees’ experience today? What workforce do you have? How engaged are they today? What workforce do you need? What workforce have you promised? What employer brand is optimum? How can you create a compelling employee experience – high level design of the 4C’s – for each targeted segment? What is the organization’s ability to implement realignment of the 4C’s? What are the rules governing change in your current culture? What is the optimum transition process? Immediate Contribution and Long-term ContextUse newest hires to develop the next generation of strategic ideas, products and leaders : Immediate Contribution and Long-term ContextUse newest hires to develop the next generation of strategic ideas, products and leaders Significant challenge and risk: A three-month in-house immersion process for all new employees Month One – Stretch challenges, resulting in intense teamwork, deep bonds with peers, character by being stretched beyond the point of failure Month Two – Charged to come up with breakthrough new product or service ideas and to develop the business and marketing plan working with Trilogy’s best and most senior people Responsibility to “own” your career Month Three – Building on connections with projects or sponsors, a rigorous evaluation by section leaders, managers and fellow graduates, and a list of specific short and long-term goals, find own place in organization Exposure to leaders and experts: Run by top management, including the CEO Opportunity for broad impact: Dramatic benefits for the organization Primary R&D engine Development and proving ground for the company’s future generation of leaders Constant source of organizational renewal and transformation Segment Alignment: Self-Empowered Innovators; Maverick Morphers Slide 53: Segment Alignment: Self-Empowered Innovators; Accomplished Contributors Creating a Strong Link from the Past . . . to the Future Reminding Employees of the Heritage and the Goal Employees Caught Doing Things RightSpot Reward Program in the Hands of Attentive Line Managers : Employees Caught Doing Things RightSpot Reward Program in the Hands of Attentive Line Managers Immediate, short-term, task-specific rewards: Outstanding overall employee recognition program Little money available for cash awards Uses day-to-day, informal, creative recognition, delivered with sincerity Managers focused on close connections: Ability to give recognition seen as a key leadership capability Sincere, specific, timely and personalized Managers measured on recognition of their staff – who is being recognized, by whom, and how often Managers held accountable for making and maintaining connections with employees Customized: Programmatic support Leadership training programs on personalized recognition Tools and exercises available to help supervisors get to know individuals’ recognition preferences Segment Alignment: Stalled Survivors and Demanding Disconnects Slide 55: Specific well-structured process, clearly communicated: Extensive, well-defined training New recruits start with a full 5-day training program Managers expected to spend extensive amounts of time with each individual employee During the first year, new employees get 235 hours of training In following years, employees get an average of 160 hours of training Continuing education program – a three-day intensive training program for career-minded employees from across the organization, including presentations by staff from every department, covering every facet of the firm Long-term, career development focus: Success based on attracting, training and retaining a highly capable and fiercely loyal workforce through a culture of trust and openness Employees motivated by an atmosphere of teamwork and service where helping customers is perceived as a public good Extensive and ongoing investment in employee training and indoctrination in company values Segment Alignment: Fair & Square Traditionalists, Demanding Disconnects Investing in a Common Base of Competence A Well-Defined Career Path, with Detailed Training, Creates Fierce Loyalty Slide 56: Team-based processes – hiring, workflow: Employees at Whole Foods have complete control on who becomes part of their team Every store is divided into teams New employees are hired into one of the teams on a provisional basis After four weeks of work, the team votes whether the employee gets to stay or not; requires 2/3s “yes” Team-based compensation: Pay beyond base wages linked to team performance People don't want buddies; they want workers -- people who are going to make them some money Teams that do well share in the profits -- up to $2.00 extra an hour is paid right back to team members, every other paycheck (13 times a year) "Customers experience the food and the space, but what they really experience is the work culture. The true hidden secret of the company is the work culture. That's what delivers the stores to the customers.” -- Chris Hitt, former President of Whole Foods Segment Alignment: Accomplished Contributors Recruiting for – and by – the Team Employee teams recruit new employees, using peer pressure to build performance Slide 57: Ambitious business needs: Goal to differentiate the Tesco deal from competitors’ by offering choice around pay, training, development and benefits Thoughtful, in-depth understanding of meaningful differences: Understood drives and needs by segment Customization: Tailored the employment proposition to enhance overall commitment levels and improve retention Created a portfolio of programs to offer more choices to employees and reflect the values and motivations of the different types of employee For example young parents can take advantage of childcare vouchers, or highly ambitious employees can choose share options Organizational reinforcement: Appointed internal “Brand Managers” Multiple Brands Based on Segmentation Using its Customer Insight Unit, normally dedicated to understanding the brand among shoppers, to segment the workforce Source: Case Study developed by Lynda Gratton, London Business School Identified five broad attitude segments within the Tesco workforce Work-LifeBalancers Pleasure Seekers Want it All Live to Work Work to Live Challenges for Learning Leaders : Challenges for Learning Leaders Emerging workforce composition Work stage, life stage, generation, and life style influences Creative and entertaining learning – the experience! Knowledge transfer – the Baby Boom retirement “brain drain” Rapid skilling employees to overcome shortages Strengthening employee engagement Multi-channel learning strategy – different strokes for different folks Technology, technology, technology Innovative sourcing Differentiated learning Learning & DevelopmentGenerational Differences : Learning & DevelopmentGenerational Differences Focus on the Young … : Focus on the Young … Think, work, and communicate at a rapid pace Work well with complexity – multitask and multiprocess Tinker to come up with solutions Play (games) Rely on social information networks rather than physical proximity or relationships Are NOT bureaucratic Connect globally Absorb streaming … audio, video, information, news Acknowledge expertise not authority Breathe digital as “oxygen” Reflections of John Seely Brown Focus on the Mid-Career … : Focus on the Mid-Career … Span learning styles Are career driven May be technology savvy Strive for career status Are work and performance driven Play and learn competitively Seek a balance in life and work Too busy to learn Have multiple sources of stimuli at once Focus on the Mature … : Focus on the Mature … Are linear thinkers Draw from a wealth of experience Need to unlearn as well as learn Are likely to require time for technology Can be in various cycles of learning Are motivated to learn just what they need Acknowledge authority May be anxious about multi-generational learning activities Learning - Variety : CHANGE MANAGEMENTaligning the organization to new directions and initiatives UNCERTAINTY EXERCISESscenarios, future; creating organizational resilience, simulation Learning - Variety SMS on the go High interactivity gaming & simulation Bricolage repurposed Discovery Just in time Sound & Music Narrative Teleconnect eLearning Directed Classroom BEST-PRACTICESHARING identification systems; language; motivation; change management COACHINGone-on-one personal development RESEARCH use of data; ways of surfacing truth;relationships/feedback loops TEAM ALIGNMENTsharing information; formingrelationships; gaining common understanding CREATIVITY EXERCISESbrainstorming; new possibilities TRAININGknowledge, skills andabilities; assessment EDUCATIONdesign, development, and delivery of a development experience;assessment; management SELF-MANAGED LEARNINGindividual-centered results SELF-MOTIVATED SENSING front-line intelligence, social change,boundary crossing PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND ALIGNMENTcommunicating expectations; developing personal attributes; measuring alignment KNOWLEDGEMANAGEMENT information systems; networks, human systems JOB ROTATIONexposure to a variety of situations APPRENTICESHIPone-on-one modeling Source: Project CL, The Concours Group ACTION LEARNING Integrated into work and drawn from work actions; ongoing Organized & Events Spontaneous & Integrated Shaping the New Workforce – Five Key Shifts for HR Leaders : Shaping the New Workforce – Five Key Shifts for HR Leaders Source: Tamara J. Erickson, The Concours Group ? Shift HR capabilities from “doing” to designing and measuring Design operations for world-class execution through efficient, flexible processes, at the necessary service levels, whether within the firm, or through outsourced relationships. ? Shift the culture from competition to cooperation In a world where value is created through innovation and resources are coupled flexibly, cooperation becomes a critical organization capability. Become masters of cultural change. ? Shift the goal from employee satisfaction to employee engagement Improving engagement is a powerful lever to improve productivity. Most companies have exhausted their ability to squeeze increased productivity through top-down pressure. ? Shift the philosophy from “equal” to “fair” Evolve from treating everyone the same, to customizing arrangements to individual needs and preferences. Develop strong “marketing” capabilities: world-class skills in survey research, segmentation, “brand” management, targeting, and communication strategies. ? Shift your focus from reactive activity to thoughtful “what if” Create a long-term workforce strategy that addresses uncertainties related to future needs and counter-intuitive sources of talent. Address the uncertainties and options ahead. The Goal: The Employer of Choice for the Employees You Need : The Goal: The Employer of Choice for the Employees You Need A company that outperforms competition in the attraction and retention of the type and quantity of talent needed for business success An organization that is able to create extraordinary levels of employee engagement: Above average levels of productivity High customer satisfaction Clear link between employee performance and business results A distinct brand that improves the quality of candidates, improves retention, and enhances engagement A Compelling Employee Experience A Highly Productive, Appropriately-Skilled Workforce Slide 66: for further information: Tamara J. Erickson tjerickson@concoursgroup.com 978-287-0170 www.concoursgroup.com 3 Kingwood Place 800 Rockmead Drive Kingwood, TX 77339 Tele: 281-359-3464 321 Arsenal Street Watertown, MA 02472 Tele: 617-926-0800 211 Piccadilly London W1J 9HF England Tele: +44 (0)20 7830 9740 For Further Reading: “It’s Time to Retire Retirement,” Harvard Business Review, March 2004 Winner of the 2004 McKinsey Award Workforce Crisis: How to Beat the Coming Shortage of Skills and Talent by Dychtwald, Erickson, and Morison, to be published by Harvard Business School Press in 2006 Slide 67: Tamara J. Erickson is an Executive Officer and member of the Board of Directors of The Concours Group. She leads the firm’s Human Capital practice, focusing on the changing workforce and innovative ways to shift the relationship between employees and corporations, and, in so doing, powerfully enhance workforce productivity. She and her co-authors are the recipients of the 2004 McKinsey Prize for the award-winning Harvard Business Review article, “It’s Time to Retire Retirement,” March 2004. She is co-author of the book Workforce Crisis: How to Beat the Coming Shortage of Skills and Talent to be published by Harvard Business School Press in 2006 and was a lead contributor to two multi-year research initiatives: Demography is De$tiny, exploring the implications of current demographic changes on human resource practices, and The New Employee/Employer Equation, developing new and powerful approaches to increasing employee engagement through segmentation. She is also a respected authority on technology and its implications for business and coauthor of the book Third Generation R&D: Managing the Link to Corporate Strategy, a widely accepted guide to making technology investments and managing innovative organizations, published in 1991. Tammy has extensive experience in corporate strategy and organizational effectiveness and oversees intellectual capital development at The Concours Group. She is a member of the Board of Directors of PerkinElmer, Inc., a Fortune 500 company competing in advanced technology markets, a member of the Audit and Governance Committees, and a former member of the Board of Allergan, Inc. tjerickson@concoursgroup.com 978-287-0170 The Concours Group A Unique Value Proposition : The Concours Group A Unique Value Proposition Education to articulate insights and motivate their adoption Advisory Services to enable quick implementation and extraordinary business outcomes Delivered by senior professionals Focused on results Driven by business outcomes Fast-cycled Independent Based on frameworks, not methodologies Catalyzing your team’s success Peer-to-peer networking World-class thought leaders Intimate client setting Delivered with excellence Leveraging the best in academia Imagining what’s possible Framing what’s practical Case and data based Collaborative Insight and frameworks for pragmatic action Research to discover and develop future best practices in business, technology and human capital Meeting the Key Challenge of Leadership TodayConcours’ Approach to Increasing Engagement : Meeting the Key Challenge of Leadership TodayConcours’ Approach to Increasing Engagement Our assessment tool is unique: it not only measures engagement, it provides valuable insights into the most powerful, pragmatic ways to enhance engagement. Our approach includes a proprietary segmentation of the workforce, based on the psychodemographic characteristics that determine the role of work in employees lives. Our well-defined “4 C” diagnostic approach - Construction, Compensation, Connection and Communication - ensures alignment of all human resource and business processes to achieve enhanced workforce productivity and business performance. We have an extensive database on the components of the “deal” – the changing elements of the employee/employer relationship and the impact of each on engagement – employee preferences and corporate best practices. Our staff includes senior experts with skill in human performance management and creative, holistic brand development. We help you sculpt your employee experience. We have an effective approach to management development, based on helping managers respond effectively to the real performance drivers of diversity. Our Human Capital Research, Education, and Advisory ServicesHelping Executives Build the Human CapitalRequired to Meet Business Objectives : Our Human Capital Research, Education, and Advisory ServicesHelping Executives Build the Human CapitalRequired to Meet Business Objectives Align and motivate employees at all levels within the corporation Innovative assessment approaches and high-impact interventions Transformation of organizational cultures to drive business results Lead in ways that enhance employee engagement Effective change management approaches to lead key initiatives Integrated programs to build engagement throughout the organization Learn at both the individual and organizational levels Powerful programs focused on developing critical business skills – the right knowledge to the right people Executive coaching, collaborative development, and action learning Design organizations that are tightly aligned with business outcomes Leverage business value through the transformation of the HR operating model Design powerful processes and structures that form the backbone of today’s successful enterprise Human Capital built through the application of four powerful levers Slide 71: Coming Programs from The Concours Institute The research and education arm of The Concours Group Insights on forward-thinking trends and leading-edge approaches for extraordinary business outcomes Cooperative Advantage – A groundbreaking multinational collaboration with Lynda Gratton on building the critical organizational capability Leadership in Uncertain Times – Two days of intimate dialogue with Jim Collins – for 20 CEOs Presidents, and COOs of major corporations Accelerating Executive Development – Research with Jay Conger on new ways to develop new leaders HR Leadership Development– A development experience for qualified members of the senior HR leadership team designed to transform the Human Resource capability No Constraints: Rethinking Your Organization from the Assumptions Up – A unique collaboration to uncover and design the Organization of the Future By bringing together . . . Senior executives – with peers and world thought leaders Breakthrough ideas – with pragmatic business issuesUnderstanding – with action and results : Founded in 1997 Distributed Offices across North America and Europe By bringing together . . . Senior executives – with peers and world thought leaders Breakthrough ideas – with pragmatic business issuesUnderstanding – with action and results Concours (kôn’körs’,-körs’) n. the act of moving or flowing together . . from the Middle English and Old French . . to assemble. The Concours GroupReinventing Professional Service

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