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t Campout with Foodborne Illness

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Information about t Campout with Foodborne Illness
Education

Published on January 7, 2008

Author: Lassie

Source: authorstream.com

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Don’t Camp Out with Foodborne Illness!:  Don’t Camp Out with Foodborne Illness! February 9, 2004 Karen Blakeslee, M.S. Food Science Institute Summertime Blues:  Summertime Blues More picnics, camping, outdoor events Greater chance of mishandling food Warmer temperatures Just one hour at temperatures above 90°F puts perishable food at risk Undercooked meat Not using a thermometer Greater chance of cross-contamination Source: www.fsis.usda.gov Incidence of Selected Pathogens:  Incidence of Selected Pathogens http://www.cdc.gov/epo/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00054940.htm Occurrences of Foodborne Illness Related to Camping:  Occurrences of Foodborne Illness Related to Camping July-September 2002 Wisconsin, youth camping excursion E.coli O157:H7 Ground beef June 2001 Nebraska camp Campylobacter jejuni Potato salad June 2001 Texas camp Salmonella panama BBQ beans August 2001 California camp Trichenella spp., parasite Bear Source: www.cdc.gov Common Foodborne Illnesses:  Common Foodborne Illnesses Campylobacter jejuni Occurs more in summer than winter 15 cases per 100,000 people Underestimated, probably over 1 million cases per year Occurs most in undercooked poultry Also found in surface water and mountain streams Causes fever, diarrhea, cramps within 2-5 days Source: www.cdc.gov Common Foodborne Illnesses:  Common Foodborne Illnesses Salmonella Mostly associated with chicken and eggs Occurs in undercooked eggs or poultry Causes fever, diarrhea, cramps within 12-72 hours Common Foodborne Illnesses:  Common Foodborne Illnesses E. coli O157:H7 Estimate 73,000 cases and 61 deaths each year Mostly associated with undercooked, contaminated ground beef Also found in sewage-contaminated water, lettuce, sprouts, salami, unpasteurized milk and juice Causes severe bloody diarrhea, cramps, little or no fever, can be deadly Source: www.cdc.gov Common Foodborne Illnesses:  Common Foodborne Illnesses Norovirus Virus transferred by fecal-oral route Causes vomiting, cramps, nausea, diarrhea, fever, dehydration, lasts 1-2 days Found in food and water Other names Stomach flu Viral gastroenteritis Very contagious! Source: www.cdc.gov Common Foodborne Illnesses:  Common Foodborne Illnesses Giardia One of the most common waterborne diseases Parasite exists everywhere Causes diarrhea, cramps, upset stomach Symptoms occur 1-2 weeks after infection Some show no symptoms Found in soil, water, surfaces and food Source: www.cdc.gov Common Foodborne Illnesses:  Common Foodborne Illnesses Cryptosporidia or “Crypto” One of the most common waterborne diseases Parasite exists everywhere Causes diarrhea, cramps, upset stomach, slight fever Some people show no symptoms Symptoms occur 2-10 days after infection Found in soil, water, surfaces and food Source: www.cdc.gov Four Steps to Food Safety:  Four Steps to Food Safety CLEAN Wash hands and surfaces often SEPARATE Avoid cross-contamination COOK Cook to proper temperatures CHILL Refrigerate foods promptly Wash Your Hands!:  Wash Your Hands! Best defense against foodborne illness! Wash after handling raw meat Use soap and safe drinking water Best for removing visible dirt and debris Other options Disposable wipes Instant hand sanitizer Waterless soap Avoid Cross-contamination:  Avoid Cross-contamination Keep raw meats separate from cooked or ready-to-eat foods Don’t put cooked food on plates that had raw meat on them Don’t use same knife to cut raw meat and ready-to-eat food Use disposable utensils if possible Keep Hot Foods Hot and Cold Foods Cold!:  Keep Hot Foods Hot and Cold Foods Cold! Many bacteria grow between 40°F and 140°F The “Temperature Danger Zone” Bacteria counts may double every 20 minutes 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, etc. Safe Cooking Temperatures:  Safe Cooking Temperatures Hamburgers - 160°F Steak - 145°F medium rare 160°F medium 170°F well done Chicken - 170°F Fin Fish – opaque and flakes easily with fork Hot Dogs – steamy hot throughout Campsite Cookery:  Campsite Cookery Plan a basic menu Can you take perishable food? Consider all nonperishable food Can you carry canned food? Try to pack light Keep perishable food cold Take a cooler and ice packs Keep cooler in the shade Open infrequently Campsite Cookery:  Campsite Cookery Nutritious nonperishable food Peanut butter Energy bars Canned or foil packed meats Jerky Juice drink pouches Dry milk, drink mixes Dried fruit, vegetables, nuts Dry cereal Dry soups, pasta, rice Dry biscuit or pancake mixes Dried eggs Trail mix Freeze dried foods Campsite Cookery:  Campsite Cookery Avoid over packing Take only what you need Pack a food thermometer Always clean between uses Pack cleanup supplies Biodegradable soap Disposable wipes Hand sanitizer Bottled water Use for drinking and cooking Burn leftover food Cookware:  Cookware Lightweight cookware Aluminum foil Pouches Non-stick foil Portable cook stove Baking kits Judging Doneness by Color:  Judging Doneness by Color Source: Kansas State University Slide21:  Source: Kansas State University Keep Perishable Food Cold:  Keep Perishable Food Cold Freeze large containers of ice Milk cartons Plastic buckets Reclosable bags Freeze juice cartons Freeze meats Store in ice to thaw slowly Store in plastic bag Use blue ice packs Drinking Water Safety:  Drinking Water Safety Take bottled water if possible Drink municipally treated water Use cleanest source possible Keep lids on containers Have reserve supply Drinking Water Safety:  Drinking Water Safety Boil water 3-5 minutes before drinking, cooking or washing dishes Water filters Filter pore size of 1 micron or less Chlorinate with household bleach 1 drop per quart, ½ tsp. Per 5 gallons Halozone tablets Wait at least 30 minutes before using Tincture of iodine or iodine tablets 12 drops per quart Wait at least 30 minutes before using Food for Your Camping Adventure:  Food for Your Camping Adventure Where are you going? How long will you be gone? Short hike Several days Going to a cabin? Know the camping facilities and rules Are there cooking facilities available? How many people are going? Are burn bans in effect? Nonperishable Foods:  Nonperishable Foods Whole fresh produce safe without chilling Use packets of condiments Breads, muffins Hard cheeses Cheddar, Swiss, Parmesan, Romano They will eventually lose quality Gone Fishin’!:  Gone Fishin’! Fish are perishable Keep fish on a stringer in the water After cleaning, keep fish cold until cooking Use within 24 hours Dining on Nature’s Good Food:  Dining on Nature’s Good Food Wild Mushrooms eesc.orst.edu/agcomwebfile/edmat/ec1496.pdf ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3303.html Edible Wild Greens www.umext.maine.edu/onlinepubs/PDFpubs/4060.pdf Wild and Edible Fruits www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/DG1133.html gardening.wsu.edu/column/09-02-01.htm References:  References www.fsis.usda.gov Keeping Food Cool During Camping, Utah State University Extension, FN/FS-250.11 http://extension.usu.edu/files/foodpubs/fs11camp.pdf What practices will keep food safe while camping? www.eatwelleatsafe.ca/factsheets/camping.pdf Guidelines for Campers and Other Recreational Groups www.state.ak.us/local/akpages/ENV.CONSERV/deh/sanitat/camping.htm Food Safety Facts: Food Safety on the Water, University of Maine Cooperative Extension, Bulletin #4271 www.umext.maine.edu/onlinepubs/htmpubs/foodsafety/4271.htm Food Safety for the Great Outdoors www.mda.state.mi.us/kids/countyfair/food/camping/index.html Don’t Camp Out with Foodborne Illness!:  Don’t Camp Out with Foodborne Illness! February 9, 2004 Karen Blakeslee, M.S. Food Science Institute

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