Sythetic Cubism

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Information about Sythetic Cubism

Published on July 10, 2008

Author: Blue_Shift

Source: slideshare.net

Description

Lets get abstract :)

Painting of the Day #15 Synthetic Cubism

Synthetic Cubism

Georges Braque Fruit Dish and Cards (1913) Oil on Canvas Pablo Picasso Le Guitariste (1910) Oil on Canvas Juan Gris Guitar (1914) Oil on Canvas Synthetic Cubism came straight outta Analytical Cubism. Using multiple perspectives really opened things up for these blockheads and eventually they felt that the analysis of perspective points was just impeding what they could be doing for the representation of the object at hand. So fuck it! They ditched the exhausting study of the perspectives and their parameters and went for the gusto. Most of these pieces were done after dozens of sketches...not color sketches I’m assuming. The downfall of this period is the total lack of imagination with color. Maybe their color sense turtled a bit after the intensity of Fauvism...but boy-o-boy most of the Synthetic Cubism pieces are drab!

Georges Braque

Fruit Dish and Cards (1913)

Oil on Canvas

Pablo Picasso

Le Guitariste (1910)

Oil on Canvas

Juan Gris

Guitar (1914)

Oil on Canvas

Synthetic Cubism came straight outta Analytical Cubism. Using multiple perspectives really opened things up for these blockheads and eventually they felt that the analysis of perspective points was just impeding what they could be doing for the representation of the object at hand. So fuck it! They ditched the exhausting study of the perspectives and their parameters and went for the gusto. Most of these pieces were done after dozens of sketches...not color sketches I’m assuming. The downfall of this period is the total lack of imagination with color. Maybe their color sense turtled a bit after the intensity of Fauvism...but boy-o-boy most of the Synthetic Cubism pieces are drab!

I n v eN t ion of Co L L ag e Braque and Picasso invented collage around 1912 while experimenting with cubism and the flattening of space. Collage is really just the inclusion of two dimensional objects to aid in pictorial creation. Braque and Picasso used a lot of magazines and newspaper and sometimes added wood grain to them. Later on, after World War One and Two, poor countries (like Germany) would produce a lot of collage artists b/c it was a lot cheaper to use scraps of paper found on the street, than to buy paint. Georges Braque Fruitdish and Glass Papier colle and charcoal on paper, 1912 George Braque Glass, Carafe and newspapers, (1914) Pasted Papers, chalk and charcoal on cardboard 24/58x11 1/4:”

Braque and Picasso invented collage around 1912 while experimenting with cubism and the flattening of space. Collage is really just the inclusion of two dimensional objects to aid in pictorial creation.

Braque and Picasso used a lot of magazines and newspaper and sometimes added wood grain to them.

Later on, after World War One and Two, poor countries (like Germany) would produce a lot of collage artists b/c it was a lot cheaper to use scraps of paper found on the street, than to buy paint.

Picasso Still Life With Chair Caning Collage (1912) 10 1/2 x13 3/4 in So this piece is said to be the first fine art collage. Actually, in Asia calligraphers had been gluing pieces of paper to paper for hundreds of years, but this is recognized as the first “fine art” collage. Whateva! I’ll cry about it on Columbus day when I’m getting paid to play video games. The piece is chair caning with pieces of cloth and paper glued to it and painted. It’s finished off with a thick rope frame, perfect for your favorite seafood restaurant!

So this piece is said to be the first fine art collage. Actually, in Asia calligraphers had been gluing pieces of paper to paper for hundreds of years, but this is recognized as the first “fine art” collage. Whateva! I’ll cry about it on Columbus day when I’m getting paid to play video games.

The piece is chair caning with pieces of cloth and paper glued to it and painted. It’s finished off with a thick rope frame, perfect for your favorite seafood restaurant!

Ferdinand Leger I really really don’t like Ferdinand Leger. His only contribution to synthetic cubism was a vibrant palette (which was much needed). Leger was a big fan of breaking everything down into cones and spheres and all that crap. All his women look this indifferent. He eventually helped found Futurism which I'm not even going to go over b/c it’s so stupid. Long story short...it was a movement about how machinery is our savior and shit in the future is gonna be like it is on the Jetson’s. Yes, a whole art movement about the Jetson’s lifestyle. Le Grand Dejeuner (3 women) Oil on Canvas 6x8ft3in 1921 MoMA, NY Still Life with Beer Mug Oil on Canvas (1921)

I really really don’t like Ferdinand Leger. His only contribution to synthetic cubism was a vibrant palette (which was much needed). Leger was a big fan of breaking everything down into cones and spheres and all that crap. All his women look this indifferent. He eventually helped found Futurism which I'm not even going to go over b/c it’s so stupid. Long story short...it was a movement about how machinery is our savior and shit in the future is gonna be like it is on the Jetson’s. Yes, a whole art movement about the Jetson’s lifestyle.

Le Grand Dejeuner (3 women)

Oil on Canvas 6x8ft3in 1921

MoMA, NY

Still Life with Beer Mug

Oil on Canvas (1921)

Marcel Duchamp Duchamp kicked some serious ass. This was the first piece he tried to show in a Cubism gallery in Paris. When the Curator asked his brothers to have him change the name of the painting he said nothing, he took the painting off the wall and took it home in a taxi. From there he realized that he didn’t want to have any associations with art groups. Later this was exhibited at a NY Armory show in NYC as a “new art from Paris” exhibition. It was met with shock at the nude figure. OMG! What a perv! Duchamp had some major contributions later on in the art world, but we’ll get to them down the road. He was definitely one to think outside the cube :P BTW, Philadelphia Museum of Art has the largest collection of this super genius’s work. Just throwing that out there! Nude Descending a Staircase Oil on canvas 19112 577/8x351/8 Philadelphia Museum of Art

Duchamp kicked some serious ass. This was the first piece he tried to show in a Cubism gallery in Paris. When the Curator asked his brothers to have him change the name of the painting he said nothing, he took the painting off the wall and took it home in a taxi. From there he realized that he didn’t want to have any associations with art groups.

Later this was exhibited at a NY Armory show in NYC as a “new art from Paris” exhibition. It was met with shock at the nude figure. OMG! What a perv!

Duchamp had some major contributions later on in the art world, but we’ll get to them down the road. He was definitely one to think outside the cube :P

BTW, Philadelphia Museum of Art has the largest collection of this super genius’s work. Just throwing that out there!

Nude Descending a Staircase

Oil on canvas 19112

577/8x351/8

Philadelphia Museum of Art

END.

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