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suesRakupots

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sue

Published on February 12, 2008

Author: Marcell

Source: authorstream.com

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SUE’S ceramics :  SUE’S ceramics Raku firings in Vivienne Rodwell-Davis’ garden on 7th May and 14th June 2003 Photo of pots bisque fired:  Photo of pots bisque fired Notes on Bisque Firing :  Notes on Bisque Firing The Bisque firing is the first firing for both the Stoneware and Raku processes. The purpose of the Bisque firing is to remove the real and chemical water from the clay piece and to harden it to a still-porous state.  In the Bisque firing, the ceramic pieces are placed in the kiln and the temperature is slowly raised to boil off the real water still in the piece. During this process, the piece first expands slightly and then contracts as the water is removed.  As the temperature increases, the chemical water begins to burn off. This effect is completed by the time the kiln reaches 1100 degrees F. The firing continues until cone .07 or .06 is reached, at which time the kiln shuts itself off. The kiln is allowed to cool down before being opened.  When the Bisque firing is complete, the ceramic pieces have lost as much as 12% or their original volume. After the Bisque firing, the glazes are applied. The glazes adhere by being slightly absorbed into the surface of the still-porous piece. the pieces are now ready for either the stoneware or Raku firing. Black and White RAKU These pots were wax resisted and dipped in white and astrakan glaze inside and out. They were then buried in sawdust after the firing. Technical term – Reduction. This gives a metallic finish to the glaze.:  Black and White RAKU These pots were wax resisted and dipped in white and astrakan glaze inside and out. They were then buried in sawdust after the firing. Technical term – Reduction. This gives a metallic finish to the glaze. Raku Notes:  Raku Notes The Raku process originated in Japan in the 16th century. The process is named for the Japanese family that was most prominent in its development. In the USA, the process was modified to take advantage of American firing techniques and the chemical properties of the glazes under stressful fast firing and thermal shock conditions. In the Raku process, glazes are applied to the Bisque-fired ceramic piece, which is then placed in the Kiln and brought to an optimal firing temperature very quickly. When the glazes are melted and shiny in the Kiln (approximately 1800 degrees F), the piece is removed (with tongs) and placed in a combustible material such as wood chips or dry leaves. The material immediately bursts into flames from the heat of the piece. These pots were dipped in white glaze inside and turquoise on the outside and painted with strips of blue glaze and exposed to the air not buried in sawdust. :  These pots were dipped in white glaze inside and turquoise on the outside and painted with strips of blue glaze and exposed to the air not buried in sawdust. Turquoise glaze inside with white and blue glaze on the outside:  Turquoise glaze inside with white and blue glaze on the outside Close up of top of tallest vase:  Close up of top of tallest vase This vase is was made on a former (rolled out clay and wrapped round loo roll) and then pinched from the top:  This vase is was made on a former (rolled out clay and wrapped round loo roll) and then pinched from the top Wax resist stripes. Dipped in Turquoise glaze outside and White glaze inside:  Wax resist stripes. Dipped in Turquoise glaze outside and White glaze inside Glazed white inside and turquoise on the outside. This pot was exposed after firing.:  Glazed white inside and turquoise on the outside. This pot was exposed after firing. Broad wax resist stripes. Bottom of pot dipped in blue and top in turquoise glaze. This pot was buried half in sawdust upside down.:  Broad wax resist stripes. Bottom of pot dipped in blue and top in turquoise glaze. This pot was buried half in sawdust upside down. Wax resist stripes. Buried in sawdust = reduction:  Wax resist stripes. Buried in sawdust = reduction

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