advertisement

SUCCESS161104

67 %
33 %
advertisement
Information about SUCCESS161104
Entertainment

Published on January 12, 2008

Author: Stella

Source: authorstream.com

advertisement

Slide1:  Towards Maximizing Contributions of Immigrants in British Columbia’s Economic Development: A Community-Based Holistic Model of Immigrants Economic Integration Presented by Lilian To, Chief Executive Officer, S.U.C.C.E.S.S. Slide2:  Immigration Highlights in B.C. Holistic Settlement and Integration Service Model at S.U.C.C.E.S.S. Economic Integration and Social Integration Small Business/Self Employment – a viable option for new immigrants Employment and Economic Integration Outreach Initiatives Recommendations Presentation Outline Slide3:  Immigration Highlights in B.C. Slide6:  Cultural Diversity Highlights 2001 Census Proportion of foreign-born highest in 70 years, over 40% in Lower Mainland Immigration in the 90’s, 58% from Asia; 11% in the Caribbean, and Central and South American; 8% in Africa; 3% in the United States and 20% in Europe Highest proportion of visible minorities in B.C., 21.6% Cities with largest visible minority populations: Richmond 59%; Vancouver 49% and Burnaby 48.6% 38% multiple ethnic origins Municipalities with the highest percentage of new immigrants 1991-2001: Richmond 29.8%; Burnaby 24.3%; Coquitlam 19.7%; Vancouver 19.7% Slide7:  Holistic Settlement and Integration Service Model S.U.C.C.E.S.S. sees the adjustment of immigrants into a new community is a process, during which immigrants need a continuum of services, in varying degree according to their own backgrounds and experiences.:  S.U.C.C.E.S.S. sees the adjustment of immigrants into a new community is a process, during which immigrants need a continuum of services, in varying degree according to their own backgrounds and experiences. Settlement/Integration Continuum Settlement                          Acclimatization Adaptation Integration Settlement refers to acclimatization and the early stages of adaptation ::  Settlement/Integration Continuum Settlement                          Acclimatization Adaptation Integration Settlement refers to acclimatization and the early stages of adaptation : Finding accommodation Getting a job Learning about the new neighbourhood Learning a new language Settlement is not a short term process that is limited to the immigrant’s initial adjustment period after arriving in a new country Slide10:  Multiple settlement issues S.U.C.C.E.S.S. ANNUAL REPORT 2003-2004 OVERVIEW:  S.U.C.C.E.S.S. ANNUAL REPORT 2003-2004 OVERVIEW (1) Mandate: 1: Employment Service 2: S.U.C.C.E.S.S. Training Institute (Language and Vocational Training) 3: Social Services (Settlement, Counselling and Community) 4: Health Services (2) Scope: 12 locations in Vancouver, Richmond, Tri-city, Burnaby, Surrey, Port Moody (including 7 multi-service centres, 6 Employment/training centre and one Business/Development Centre) (3) Clientele: 501,562 client service in year 2003-04 886,479 attendance (4) Staff: over 350 staff (including Health Care) (5) Volunteers: 9,100 volunteers participated in year 2003-04 (6) Overall Budget: $16.5 million in Year 2003-04 (including budget for Health Care) Social Service Budge: $10.17 million in Year 2003-04 (37.6% from Federal, 25.7% from Provincial and 1.1% from Municipal Govt., 35.6% from Community) excluding Health Care (7) Accreditation: Community and Social Services: Official accredited by COA (Council On Accreditation) in November 2003. PPSEC (Private Post-Secondary Education Commission) to be completed end 2004 MLC Care Home to be accredited by 2005 Slide12:  Integrated Service and Holistic Approach small business development Seniors & Women Program Government, Businesses, Employers, Community Organizations, Schools, Communities Slide13:  Economic Integration and Social Integration Economic Integration and Social Integration :  Economic Integration and Social Integration a. Defining Integration “ … gradual process by which new residents become active participants in the economic, social, civic, cultural and spiritual affairs of a new homeland. It is a dynamic process in which values are enriched through mutual acquaintance, accommodation and understanding. It is a process in which both the migrants and their compatriots find an opportunity to make their own distinctive contributions” (cited in Kage, 1962:165, from Best Settlement Practices 1998:6) www.success.bc.ca www.i-Boss.org SUCCESS Business Development & Training Official Definition::  Official Definition: “CIC’s integration strategy aims to enable newcomers to settle, adapt and integrate as quickly and comfortably as possible so that they may become contributing members of Canadian society. It is a two-way process that encourages adjustments on the part of both newcomers and the receiving society. Canada responds to the needs of newcomers through a variety of settlement programs, services and integration promotion activities throughout the integration process” (Citizenship and Immigration Canada, 2002 from www.cic.gc.ca/english/pub/dpr2002/cic02dpr06) www.success.bc.ca www.i-Boss.org SUCCESS Business Development & Training Simple Version::  Simple Version: “Ultimately, the goal of integration is to encourage newcomers to be fully engaged in the economic, social, political and cultural life of Canada” (Dorais, 2002: quoted at the “The Language of Immigrant Integration” Presentation to S.U.C.C.E.S.S. by Prof. Peter Li, 2003) www.success.bc.ca www.i-Boss.org SUCCESS Business Development & Training b. Economic Integration for this presentation is defined as::  b. Economic Integration for this presentation is defined as: “ process during which immigrants and the host community (are assisted to) go through various stages including orientation, skill enhancement, social networking and participation; and eventually become financially self-reliance and contributive members of the Canadian economy”. www.success.bc.ca www.i-Boss.org SUCCESS Business Development & Training c. Economic Integration – as one of the four dimensions of integration (Best Settlement Practice 1998:10):  c. Economic Integration – as one of the four dimensions of integration (Best Settlement Practice 1998:10) the social sphere the economic sphere the cultural sphere the political sphere www.success.bc.ca www.i-Boss.org SUCCESS Business Development & Training d. Economic Integration – as the entry point for full integration:  d. Economic Integration – as the entry point for full integration Priority of new immigrants the process of economic integration will also foster social, cultural and political integration economic independence is a top www.success.bc.ca www.i-Boss.org SUCCESS Business Development & Training Slide20:  Small Business/Self Employment – a viable option for new immigrants 2. Small Business/Self Employment – a viable option for new immigrants:  2. Small Business/Self Employment – a viable option for new immigrants Economic Integration is very often confined to employment. Since 1990, Small Business/Self Employment become a viable option for new immigrants www.success.bc.ca www.i-Boss.org SUCCESS Business Development & Training 2. Small Business/Self Employment – a viable option for new immigrants (Cont.):  2. Small Business/Self Employment – a viable option for new immigrants (Cont.) Total Business in BC in 2001 344,500 (100%) Small Business (less than 50 employees) 150,300 (43.6%) Self-Employed Business 187,100 (54.3%) Big Business 7,100 (2.1%) www.success.bc.ca www.i-Boss.org SUCCESS Business Development & Training 1999 Private Sector Work Force in BC:  1999 Private Sector Work Force in BC Self-Employment 22% Small Business Employment 35% Big Business Employment 42% Total Private Sector Employment 100% (Source: Small Business Profile 2002) Western Economic Diversification Canada Ministry of Competition, Science and Enterprise www.success.bc.ca www.i-Boss.org SUCCESS Business Development & Training 3. Service Model:  3. Service Model New Immigrants Local Manufacturers / Business Associations Business Info / Orientation Services Cross Cultural Business Orientation - Training Courses - Seminars - Ind. Consultation Govt. and Professional Services One Stop Business Registration Business Networking Events Business Ventures S.U.C.C.E.S.S. Business Development & Training Economic Integration Service Model 2002 New Immigrants Local Manufacturers / Business Associations Business Info / Orientation Services Cross Cultural Business Orientation - Training Courses - Seminars - Ind. Consultation Govt. and Professional Services One Stop Business Registration Business Networking Events Business Ventures S.U.C.C.E.S.S. Business Development & Training Economic Integration Service Model 2002 www.success.bc.ca www.i-Boss.org SUCCESS Business Development & Training Gateway to Asia Youth Entrepreneur Training Self Employment Training Export North Business Partnership (CME) Sustainable Employment Network Business Link / Loan for New Immigrants One Stop Service for Business Immigrants:  One Stop Service for Business Immigrants Business Info/Orientation Services Referral and linkages with government and professional services One stop business registration Training courses/seminars on business management, finance, import, export etc. Individual presentation Business networking events Linkages with Canadian businesses and business associations (e.g. BC Chamber of Commerce, Vancouver Board of Trade, Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters Association etc.) Gateway to Asia:  Gateway to Asia Export market cannot be ignored in the era of globalization and the new world economy Strength of Asian Immigrants with Asian Links and Business experience Started 2 years: 880 members/exporters. Sales reached 11 million last year Funded by WED Gateway to Asia:  Gateway to Asia Linkage/partnership with business in Vancouver Island and Northern B.C. (Prince George, Fort St. John etc.) 3 trade missions to China 2003-2004 inclusive of immigrants and Canadian businesses from Kitamats, Terrace, Prince George, Nicola Band, Nanaimo etc. Business contract signed Other Initiatives for Business Immigrants:  Other Initiatives for Business Immigrants Youth Entrepreneur Training 3.5 months training Target youth at risk 80% success rate in employment or starting business Self Employment Training Target the unemployed 1 year training 80% success rate in employment or starting business HRSD funded Other Initiatives for Business Immigrants:  Other Initiatives for Business Immigrants Business Links for New Immigrants partnership with WED and Coast Capital Savings Business loans for new immigrants with no credit history Business counseling, training and support WED funded Other Initiatives for Business Immigrants:  Other Initiatives for Business Immigrants Canadian Business Partnership e.g. Canadian Manufacturers and Export Association (B.C. region) - with MOU signed Joint Training Sessions on Asian Pacific Trades for Immigrants and Canadian businesses Cooperation on Canadian Trade Fair - March 4-5, 2005 S.U.C.C.E.S.S:  S.U.C.C.E.S.S Employment and Economic Integration Connecting Business and Skilled & Professional Immigrants: An Economic & Employment Win-Win Slide32:  Key Labour Market Trends in British Columbia Longitudinal Study from Statistics Canada: only 4 out of 10 newcomers are working in their occupation fields. Statistics Canada: 58% working age immigrants had post-secondary degrees at landing compared to 43% of Canadian population. Immigrants with university degrees earn 40% less than Canadian born. Lack of credential recognition, Prior Learning Assessment, ,local experience, language proficiency and “bridging” training opportunities are key hurdles. Immigration will account for 100% of net growth in the province’s labour force by 2011. Skills Shortages:  Skills Shortages Sixty percent of new job openings in BC to 2011 will be in trades, technical, skilled and professional occupations, and most of these jobs will require some type of formal training and certification. Immigrants will be a key to labour force growth:  Immigrants will be a key to labour force growth Source: BCSTATS, 2002. Skills Wastage:  Skills Wastage The Conference Board of Canada estimates that 540,000 Canadians would earn an additional $4.1 billion to $5.9 billion annually if their learning, experience and credentials could be rewarded and recognized in the workplace. It maintains that the single largest reason for “unrecognized learning” is unrecognized foreign credentials. Jeffrey Reitz of the University of Toronto estimates that the under-utilization of immigrants’ skills and education represents $15 billion a year of foregone earnings to immigrants. Slide36:  Strategies to Enhance New Immigrants’ Contribution to the Economy More resources should be devoted to English language instruction with focus on vocational and work place language enhancement. Improvements in and greater reliance on Prior Learning Assessment (PLA). New initiatives to facilitate the assessment and recognition of foreign credentials. Programs to “fast track” certification of immigrants’ qualifications in occupations subject to public regulation and standards. For example: Health care occupations, Trades, Engineering, IT, Accounting Slide37:  Strategies for Breaking Down Barriers Address systemic barriers at three levels: Systematic change to accreditation, licensing and prior learning assessment. Employers’ active participation to encourage access. Including community acceptance. Investment in immigrants. a) Integrated bridging program b) Access to labour market language training and employability training. c) Access to work experience. Slide38:  The Importance of employers’ active participation “ …..The business community needs to become more engaged with immigration policy and in providing opportunities for immigrants to fully contribute to the BC economy…..” Slide39:  S.U.C.C.E.S.S. and its Approaches in Connecting Employers Slide40:  ·         In July 2002, S.U.C.C.E.S.S. released a comprehensive report on “Enhancing the Participation of Immigrants in the BC Economy and Labour Market, including a Chinese Canadian Workforce Strategy. (CCWS)” Slide41:  A major gap identified: “…in immigrant employment strategies in BC is a lack of meaningful engagement and partnerships with employer groups…” Therefore, a major part of S.U.C.C.E.S.S.’s strategic direction is: “.. to work with business groups to connect skilled and professional immigrants directly to the skills and talents needed by employers throughout the province…” ·         Slide42:  CURRENT ACTIVITIES THAT CONNECT IMMIGRANT PROFESSIONALS TO EMPLOYERS Slide43:  Work with employers at local level 7 employment services centers directly working with local employers, Career Café etc. Partnership with Employers: a. Career & Recruitment Fair, Public Services Commission recruitment activity, etc. b. Customized Training for employers: HSBC, travel agencies, etc. c. Cultural sensitivity training for employments: GM etc. Job Mentoring Program & Internship Partnership with Business: Business Development and Training Centre, Gateways to Asia, Youth Entrepreneur Training Program , etc 5. The LAND (Language Acquisition and New Direction) Program for new immigrant youth connecting to employability and work experience. 6. Amundson Centre of Excellence for Employment Counselor Training. Slide44:  Work with Community Partners in Policy, Advocacy and Support to Employers Partners such as: The BC Chamber of Commerce WCG International of Victoria The Vancouver Regional Construction Association Human Capital Strategies The Canadian Manufacturers, BC Division, Etc… Slide45:  S.U.C.C.E.S.S./BC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE          forum on Connecting Businesses and Skilled & Professional Immigrants: An Economic & Employment Win-Win. over 200 immigrants, business representatives, educators, government officials and community service providers participated. Sector category include: Internet Technology, computer & Networking, Engineering, Medical & Health, Business & administration, Sales & Marketing, Legal, Accounting & Finance, Etc. ·         ·         Slide46:  Address needs of small business related to skilled immigrants and skill shortage.  Support for small business recruitment, employment, and retention of skilled immigrants  Development of small business resources and tools  Development of a strategy for co-operation and the formation of cross-sector partnerships   Recommend subsequent industry-specific forums The suggestions and ideas from forum participants: for employers Slide47:  Qualification recognition and Prior learning assessment Pre-Landing Services Advanced English training for trades and professions. Employability/work place communication training. Bridging and skills upgrading, Apprenticeship and internships opportunities Mentorship and work experience opportunities. Suggestions from forum participants: for immigrants Slide48:  Business-Immigrant Employment Tool Kit & Employer Resources Internet Access Immigration and Employment Tools and Resources, e.g. BC International Qualification Program, etc. 2. Employment Equity Tools and Resources. e.g. HRDC Employment Equity Site, etc. 3. International Credentials and Prior Learning Assessment Tools and Resources, e.g. Prior Learning Assessment in BC PLA online, etc. 4. Online Recruitment and Job Search Tools and Resources, e.g. HRDC Electronic Labour Exchange, etc. 5. Research Reports and Papers, e.g. The University of Toronto Ethnic Studies Research Site, etc. Slide49:  Linking Employers from Business Network Objective: To facilitate employers to hire professional and skilled immigrants Partners: BC Chamber of Commerce Tourism BC Employer groups from industry sectors (BC Construction, home builders, movers, oil & gas, forestry etc. ) Financial Institutions, Technology Companies and others Pilot Project: 1. Employer Resources 2. Human Resources Support 3. Cultural Sensitivity / Awareness, Supervisory Training 4. Employer Data Base Slide50:  Industry Sector Partners, Current and Planned:   Small Business – BC Chamber of Commerce and its affiliated chambers Residential Construction – Canadian Home Builders Association of BC Manufacturing – Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters, BC Division Non-Residential Construction – Vancouver Regional Construction Association Tourism – Tourism BC and Hospitality Industry Education Advisory Committee Aerospace – Aerospace Industries Association of BC Technology – Biotechnology Alliance, New Media BC, BC Technology Industries Association, Association of Professional Engineers, and Applied Science Technologists and Technicians of BC Slide51:  Addressing Barriers to Trades Barriers to Trades Careers:  Barriers to Trades Careers Current and anticipated skill shortages in trades and immigrants’ low participation Barriers include: Language Canadian work experience Awareness of trades careers Cultural barriers Credential recognition Access to settlement services Employment supports Immigrant Target Groups:  Immigrant Target Groups Immigrants with foreign trades and technical credentials. Unemployed or under-employed immigrants. Immigrant youth and children of immigrants. S.U.C.C.E.S.S. Trades Partnerships:  S.U.C.C.E.S.S. Trades Partnerships Kwantlen University College Roofing Contractors’ Association of BC BC Construction Association BC Chamber Critical Skills Task Force And more… Slide55:  The B-TEC Program gives you 9 months of full-time training The Preparatory Program (Trade Language, Safety, WHMIS, First Aid, etc.) 4 months of training. The preparatory program has been developed in conjunction with Kwantlen to let people enter the trades. Upon completion, students will have met all the requirements they need to enter a Trade-Specific Program at Kwantlen University College. Trade-Specific Program (Practical Technical Skills & Knowledge) 5 months of training in the trade of your choice. Upon completion, students will receive a standard Kwantlen Certificate. Preparatory Program for Roofing Apprenticeship:  Preparatory Program for Roofing Apprenticeship Joint program offered by S.U.C.C.E.S.S. and RCABC 5 Months of Full Time Training Especially developed for immigrants, those wanting to enter the roofing industry, or wanting to change careers After completing the program, graduates can enter the 2nd year of the 3-year apprenticeship Work and earn your inter-provincial qualification at the same time S.U.C.C.E.S.S./BC Construction Association Partnership:  S.U.C.C.E.S.S./BC Construction Association Partnership To develop a comprehensive skilled immigrant/construction industry strategic plan to increase the employment of skilled immigrants among construction contractors. This plan will include an integrated assessment and bridging model that can be utilized in all geographical areas across BC, and which can eventually be tested in other industries. It is anticipated the strategic plan will lead to the development of an assessment tool; the development of bridging programs for immigrants; increasing skilled immigrants' access to the construction industry; and the impact of the assessment tools and bridging programs on the construction industry. BC Chamber Critical Skills Task Force:  BC Chamber Critical Skills Task Force To close the gap between the skill requirements of Small and Medium sized enterprises and the employment of people from groups under-represented in the workforce To develop and implement strategies and tools promoting recruitment, training and retention To make connections and develop on-going partnerships between The business community Representatives for under-employed groups Education & Training providers To design and develop projects that address skill shortages Other Opportunities:  Other Opportunities Joint proposal with BC Construction Association, Vancouver Regional Construction Association Discussions with Canadian Home Builders’ Association of BC, trades training in Framing Partnerships with K-12 stakeholders (e.g. LANDS program for immigrant youth in partnership with Richmond School Board) Submission to Federal & Provincial Ministers - Honourable Hedy Fry Outreach Initiatives Regional Immigration Initiative:  Outreach Initiatives Regional Immigration Initiative Pathway to Okanagan Capacity Building: building partnership with local stake holders and employers Recruit, settle, train and retain new immigrants to move up the region Other support services with website, video and printed materials/information Outreach Initiatives Regional Immigration Initiative:  Outreach Initiatives Regional Immigration Initiative Northern BC Initiative Business and export opportunities in North BC Oil & Gas and resource industry skill shortage Partnership with Prince George & Fort St. John Economic Commission, Mayors, City Councillors, Business Leaders, Northern Light College and others Outreach Initiatives Regional Immigration Initiative:  Outreach Initiatives Regional Immigration Initiative Northern BC Initiative 49 immigrants visited Northern BC for business, export and employment opportunities 1st information session led by Northern BC leaders attracted over 300 immigrants at one time with major interests in business, export and employment settlement opportunities up North Outreach Initiatives Regional Immigration Initiative:  Outreach Initiatives Regional Immigration Initiative Northern BC Initiative Follow up language and bridging training with Northern Light College Follow up integrated services and settlement linking up with local agencies S.U.C.C.E.S.S. and partners to set up coordinating council with representatives from the community government and Northern BC representatives in January 2005 Slide64:  Recommendations

Add a comment

Related presentations