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SpecialEdRepCardSlid es Final2007

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Information about SpecialEdRepCardSlid es Final2007
Education

Published on January 10, 2008

Author: Margherita

Source: authorstream.com

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Closing the Achievement Gap:  Closing the Achievement Gap Statewide Summer Reading Program:  Statewide Summer Reading Program Library Summer Reading Program:  Library Summer Reading Program State Library sponsors a Summer Reading Program for children and teens. Research shows students in high need areas lose ground in summer with school out. These losses add up each year. This year’s summer reading program is called… Slide9:  www.nysl.nysed.gov Point To Statewide Summer Reading Slide10:  www.nysl.nysed.gov Point to Find Your Public Library Slide11:  Students with Disabilities June 2007 Achievement Is Up:  Achievement Is Up Achievement is up in grades 3-8 English and math. Fewer students are educated in separate settings. More are taking and passing Regents Exams each year. More are graduating each year. More are earning Regents Diplomas. More are going to college than a decade ago. But Problems Remain:  But Problems Remain Black students are disproportionately classified in special education. Still, not enough students are in general education programs, especially in the Big 5 Cities. Overall, achievement is still too low, and the graduation rate is still low. Here are the Details:  Here are the Details Slide15:  Statewide Classification Rates of Students with Disabilities by Race/Ethnicity 2005. For example, this shows 15.1% of Black students are classified in special education, etc. The special education classification rate is highest for Black and American Indian students. Asian students are very significantly underrepresented compared with all other groups. N: 214,661 94,263 85,300 2,469 10,307 407,000 Slide16:  School-Age Integration Slide17:  Less than 2% in Separate Sites (122) 2 to 4.3% (123) 4.4 to 7% (124) More than 7% (325) A decade ago, more students with disabilities were educated in separate settings. Map shows 1996-97, by school district Slide18:  Less than 2% in Separate Sites (278) 2 to 4.3% (183) 4.4 to 7% (134) More than 7% (89) 6/6/07 Over the past decade, there has been a significant reduction in the number of districts placing more than 7% of students with disabilities in separate settings. In 1997, 325 districts did so. Now 89 do. Slide19:  Much larger percentages of students with disabilities are provided special education services in separate classes and in separate settings in the Big 5 Cities, compared to rest of State. Slide20:  Grade 3-8 English The percentage of students with disabilities meeting the standards increased in 2007, although results remained low. :  The percentage of students with disabilities meeting the standards increased in 2007, although results remained low. Percentage of Students Scoring at Levels 3 and 4 Grade 3 = 23,811 26,692 Grade 4 = 26,474 28,281 Grade 5 = 28,987 29,985 Grade 6 = 28,883 29,055 Grade 7 = 29,237 29,842 Grade 8 = 29,119 29,514 Grades 3-8= 166,511 173,369 Number Tested 2006 2007 In every grade, fewer students with disabilities showed serious academic problems.:  In every grade, fewer students with disabilities showed serious academic problems. Percentage of Students Scoring at Levels 1 Slide23:  Percentage of Students Scoring at Level 3 and 4 In most categories, more students with disabilities met the standards. Results varied widely among need/resource categories. Students with disabilities in Low Need Districts were much more likely to meet the standards. Slide24:  Percentage of Students Scoring at Level 1 The percentage of students with disabilities showing serious academic problems decreased in every need/resource category. Slide25:  Grade 3-8 Math The percentage of students with disabilities meeting the math standards increased in 2007, although the results overall are still far too low. :  The percentage of students with disabilities meeting the math standards increased in 2007, although the results overall are still far too low. Percentage of Students Scoring at Levels 3 and 4 Grade 3 = 27,045 26,780 Grade 4 = 29,043 28,327 Grade 5 = 30,290 29,960 Grade 6 = 30,077 29,040 Grade 7 = 29,791 29,659 Grade 8 = 29,539 29,305 Grades 3-8= 175,785 173,071 Number Tested 2006 2007 In every grade, a smaller percentage of students with disabilities showed serious academic problems this year.:  In every grade, a smaller percentage of students with disabilities showed serious academic problems this year. Percentage of Students Scoring at Level 1 Slide28:  Percentage of Students Scoring at Levels 3 and 4 Across grades 3-8, every need/resource category improved. Students with disabilities in Low Need Districts were 3 times as likely as those in the Big 4 Cities to meet all the standards. Slide29:  Percentage of Students Scoring at Level 1 Fewer students showed serious academic problems across grades 3-8 in every need/resource category. Students with disabilities in the Big 4 Cities were about 4 times as likely as those in Low Need Districts to show serious academic problems. Slide30:  Regents Examinations Slide31:  Even with a tremendous increase in the number of students with disabilities who take the Regents English Exam each year, almost two-thirds pass at 55. Slide32:  *Results beginning in 1999 reflect students taking either of the two math examinations. Sequential Mathematics Course I examination was discontinued in 2002. Even with a tremendous increase in the number of students with disabilities who take the Regents Math A Exam each year, 70% pass at 55. Slide33:  Graduation vs. Dropping Out Slide34:  More students with disabilities are graduating, and more are earning Regents Diplomas, even though they must pass more challenging courses. The increase in Regents diplomas in 2005 was especially large, because for the first time, students could earn a Regents Diploma passing 5 Regents Exams and an Advanced Regents Diploma with 8 Regents Exams. Slide35:  Students with disabilities graduate at lower rates than general education students. Both groups benefit from a fifth year of high school. Slide36:  Students with disabilities can succeed if they have the needed resources. Five-year graduation and dropout rates varied widely by need/resource category. Students who started 9th grade in 2001 after 5 years Slide37:  The percentage of students with disabilities in college in this State has increased modestly since 1997. 2.8% 3.0% 3.3% Number of Individuals with Disabilities and Percent of Total Enrollment in NYS Institutions of Higher Education* *Data for 1998 are not available 3.4% 3.4% 3.6% 3.4% 3.5% Achievement Is Up:  Achievement Is Up Although overall achievement and graduation rates for students with disabilities are still too low – Achievement is up in grades 3-8 English and math. Fewer students are educated in separate settings. More are taking and passing Regents Exams each year. More are graduating each year. More are earning Regents Diplomas. More are going to college than a decade ago. But Serious Problems Remain:  But Serious Problems Remain Black students are disproportionately classified in special education. Still, not enough students are in general education programs, especially in the Big 5 Cities. Overall, achievement is still too low, and the graduation rate is still low. What the Regents and SED are Doing:  What the Regents and SED are Doing Targeting help to schools and districts that need it. Will identify successful schools and promote effective practices. Addressing needs in literacy, behavior, and inappropriate referrals. Making Sure Students Can Read:  Making Sure Students Can Read Difficulty in reading is a main reason students are classified in special education. To solve reading problems early, we use a “Response to Intervention” in reading in the early grades. Teachers use research-based strategies to teach all students to read, evaluate results, intensify instruction as needed– before they are classified in special education. Included in proposed regulations We will give guidance for schools on how to implement. Will fund school-based RtI projects and State technical assistance center with $2 million in federal funds. Solving Behavior Problems:  Solving Behavior Problems Behavior problems also cause unnecessary referrals to special education. To prevent that, we are using Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (PBIS). Schools create clear schoolwide behavior policies, make the expectations clear to students, and intervene when they break the rules. Funding PBIS programs in districts that need it statewide -- $4 million. Reducing Disproportionality By Race/Ethnicity:  Reducing Disproportionality By Race/Ethnicity To reduce disproportionate representation by race and ethnicity, we are trying to prevent inappropriate referrals to special education: Funding a Statewide Technical Assistance Center on Disproportionality at New York University. We require districts to review policies, procedures and practices if they have high rates of disproportionality. Slide44:  Students with Disabilities June 2007

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