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Slivovsky CPE350 Lecture5

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Published on January 7, 2008

Author: Amateur

Source: authorstream.com

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Effective Presentations:  Effective Presentations CPE 350 Lecture 3 Lynne Slivovsky Term: Fall 2007 Oral Presentations:  Oral Presentations “Nothing should be explained in a way that it cannot be understood by an intelligent 12 year old.” -Albert Einstein Oral Presentations:  Oral Presentations “Americans are more afraid of speaking in front of groups than dying.” -London Times, 1973. Oral Presentations:  Oral Presentations How People Evaluate Presentations Preparing the Presentation Presentation Tips How People Evaluate Presentations:  How People Evaluate Presentations Three elements of presentation: The 3 V’s Verbal Actual words and content that come out of the speaker’s mouth. Vocal How the presentation is given: including pitch, enthusiasm, inflection, and intonation. Visual What the audience sees: the speaker’s appearance, eye contact, posture, facial expressions, and gestures. How People Evaluate Presentations:  How People Evaluate Presentations A study in 1964 by Dr. Albert Mehrabian indicates that the impact of each element breaks down to 7% Verbal 38% Vocal 55% Visual How People Evaluate Presentations:  How People Evaluate Presentations A study in 1981 by J. Baird indicates that in the first 7 seconds of meeting someone, people typically form a great number of subconscious opinions about the person: Income level Education level Competence Character Trustworthiness Personality Confidence Intelligence Work ethic Dependability How People Evaluate Presentations:  How People Evaluate Presentations These opinions are based on: Appearance Dress Posture Speech patterns Oral Presentations:  Oral Presentations How People Evaluate Presentations Preparing the Presentation Analyze the Audience Organize the Presentation Lay out the slides Meet the Time Constraints Prepare for Q&A Presentation Tips Analyze the Audience:  Analyze the Audience “An oral presentation is for the benefit of the audience, not the presenter” Analyze the Audience:  Analyze the Audience Be aware of answers to these questions when preparing your presentation: What are they interested in? What do they want from your talk? What does the audience already know about my subject? What don’t they know? What is the attitude of the audience towards me and my subject? What are the values of the audience? What do you want them to know or learn? Analyze the Audience:  Analyze the Audience Rule of thumb: Identify 3 main points people should take away from the presentation. Organize the Presentation:  Organize the Presentation Similar to writing, the presentation should have 3 main components: Introduction – “tell them what you are going to tell them” Body – “tell it to them” Conclusion – “tell them what you just told them” Organize the Presentation:  Organize the Presentation Introduction Is absolutely critical to the entire presentation Starts with simple, broad concepts Should obtain interest of audience Should identify why subject is important to audience Should tell the audience what the presentation is about Organize the Presentation:  Organize the Presentation Body Goal is to have the body “support” the main points Good to use an overview slide that lists the main points to help organize the presentation Uses appropriate use of technical detail Don’t use equations unless they are the point of the presentation (e.g. derivations are often left out). Increase complexity with time Organize the Presentation:  Organize the Presentation Conclusion Summarize and emphasize the main points (this is especially important after very complex parts of the body) Reiterate what is important about the work Use the main points to motivate next steps Organize the Presentation:  Organize the Presentation The level of detail can often look like : Introduction Conclusion Body Very general, Very simple Very general, Very simple Very detailed, Very complicated Lay out the Slides:  Lay out the Slides Use a large font (24 or greater) Use 5-7 bullets per page Avoid special effects and graphics of no value Group slides together to make a common point Let bullet points and pictures act as a guide for what to say: Do not read directly from slides Every slide should not be a list of bullets Meet the Time Constraints:  Meet the Time Constraints Meeting time constraints can make or break a talk (too long or too short) Use 2 minutes per slide on average Practice the talk! Practice in front of people Not too many times Review material before talks Practice again! Prepare for Questions:  Prepare for Questions Question period is one of the most feared parts of a presentation Note, you cannot be responsible for knowing everything Be honest, don’t fake an answer. A good idea is to rephrase the question to the questioner Informs questioner that you understand and respect the question Gives time to think Oral Presentations:  Oral Presentations How People Evaluate Presentations Preparing the Presentation Presentation Tips Presentation Tips:  Presentation Tips Speak with conviction Use dynamic body Language Do not read Maintain eye contact Take pauses Use handouts if applicable Team presentations next week:  Team presentations next week Project Proposal Introduction: project overview, client overview Need statement Project Goals & Objectives Requirements specification: marketing, engineering, constraints, criteria Preliminary design ideas Required resources

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