Slivovsky CPE350 Lecture1

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Published on December 31, 2007

Author: Melinda

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CPE 350 - Lecture 1 Capstone I:  CPE 350 - Lecture 1 Capstone I Instructor: Lynne Slivovsky Term: Fall 2007 Introduction:  Introduction Course Overview The Design Process Capstone Projects Course Overview:  Course Overview Instructor: Lynne Slivovsky Office: 20-313 Phone: 756-5383 Email: lslivovs@calpoly.edu Course Overview:  Course Overview Times: Thursday, 12:10-3:00 PM Location: 20-121 Office Hours: MWF 2-3pm, Tu 1-3pm Course Overview:  Course Overview Required Textbook Design for Electrical and Computer Engineers: Theory, Concepts, and Practice. F. M. Ford and C. S. Coulston, McGraw-Hill. Course Overview:  Course Overview Learning Objectives: Articulate design specifications and criteria by which they are to be measured Evaluate one's own team and other teams' designs Effectively contribute one's own disciplinary knowledge on a team as well as locate and evaluate new information Contribute to effective project management Effectively communicate with others in a team, fulfilling one's individual role in the project and in interfacing with customers Reflect on aspects of design and the design process Course Overview:  Course Overview Projects CPE 350 will cover the system requirements, system specification, and conceptual design portions of your projects. The detailed design, development, and implementation for your project will be in CPE 450. Course Overview:  Course Overview Projects have the following aspects to them Real World Character Interaction with a Customer Combination of Hardware and Software Independent Learning Team Experience Project Deliverables Course Overview:  Course Overview Grading Policy (subject to change): Team 45% Problem Definition Review 10% Conceptual Design review and report 35% Peer Review 5% CPE Assessment Exam 5% Individual 45% In-class tasks 20% Assignments 20% Professionalism, team participation 5% Total 100% 100% Course Overview:  Course Overview Introduction:  Introduction Course Overview The Design Process Capstone Projects The Design Process:  The Design Process Definition of Engineer The public usually thinks of someone skilled in Mathematics, Science, and Fundamental Technology. They usually don’t think of someone with Creativity The Design Process:  The Design Process Definition of Engineer en-gi-neer (n) One who employs the innovative and methodical application of scientific knowledge and technology to produce a device, system, or process, which is intended to satisfy human needs. - American College Dictionary The Design Process:  The Design Process Definition of Engineer en-gi-neer (n) One who employs the innovative and methodical application of scientific knowledge and technology to produce a device, system, or process, which is intended to satisfy human needs. - American College Dictionary The Design Process:  The Design Process Definition of engineer includes Innovative AND Methodical These two characteristics are in COMPETITION! This is what makes design difficult The Design Process:  The Design Process Definition of engineer also includes the term Satisfy human needs This emphasizes the necessity to determine user’s needs and the ethical application of the technology. The Design Process:  The Design Process Definition of Design Engineering design is the process of devising a system, component or process to meet desired needs. It is a decision-making process (often iterative), in which the basic sciences, mathematics, and engineering sciences are applied to convert resources optimally to meet a stated objective. Among the fundamental elements of the design process are the establishment of objectives and criteria, synthesis, analysis, construction, testing and evaluation. The Design Process:  The Design Process Definition of Engineering Design Engineering design is the process of devising a system, component or process to meet desired needs. It is a decision-making process (often iterative), in which the basic sciences, mathematics, and engineering sciences are applied to convert resources optimally to meet a stated objective. Among the fundamental elements of the design process are the establishment of objectives and criteria, synthesis, analysis, construction, testing and evaluation. The Design Process:  The Design Process Key to good engineering design is to follow a design process This gives structure within which creativity can occur in an efficient and effective manner. Design Process can be Prescriptive Descriptive Hybrid of the two The Design Process:  The Design Process Prescriptive Design Process An exact process, or systematic recipe, for realizing a system. Example of a systematic process for problem identification and requirements selection: *Image taken from Design for Electrical and Computer Engineers, Ford and Coulston The Design Process:  The Design Process Descriptive Design Process A less formal process that incorporates typical design activities with less emphasis on exact ordering. *Image taken from Design for Electrical and Computer Engineers, Ford and Coulston The Design Process:  The Design Process In between Descriptive and Prescriptive Design It is not always clear which of the two types you should use, or are using. Regardless, there are good reasons to using such design processes: Formalize thought processes to ensure good practices are followed, (e.g. don’t generate a concept without a good set of specifications). Keep all team members synchronized. The Design Process:  The Design Process Iteration in design In general, iterations are required before a good design can be achieved. However, changes to the design have substantial costs in time and money. *Image taken from Design for Electrical and Computer Engineers, Ford and Coulston The Design Process:  The Design Process Elements of the Design Process Problem Identification Research Requirements Specification Concept Generation Design Phase Prototyping System Integration Testing Delivery Maintenance *Image taken from Design for Electrical and Computer Engineers, Ford and Coulston The Design Process:  The Design Process Technology specific design Often there are several subcomponents that must be designed within a project. These can make the design process specific to that project. *Image taken from Design for Electrical and Computer Engineers, Ford and Coulston Introduction:  Introduction Course Overview The Design Process Capstone Projects Project 1: Adapted Kayak:  Project 1: Adapted Kayak Client: Dr. Kevin Taylor (KINE) and the Central Coast Assistive Technology Center Design a joystick and sip-and-puff interface to a trolling motor to “paddle” a sea kayak Project 2: Sensory Stimulation Room:  Project 2: Sensory Stimulation Room Client: VTC Enterprises Definition of the Problem: There are 70 individuals in this program who have sensory integration issues. They need the opportunity to experience sensory stimulation through activity that is adult appropriate and not infantile Most people think there are 5 senses; however there are 7. This room would have activities which stimulate 7 senses Seeing Hearing Tasting Smelling Feeling Vestibular Propriaceptic Project 3: Chin Switch Environmental Remote Controls:  Project 3: Chin Switch Environmental Remote Controls Sponsor: VTC Enterprises Definition of the Problem: There are several individuals who are cognitively aware; however, whose bodies act as a paraplegic. At this time they are fully dependent upon others to turn on/of lights, control temperatures, radios, and to get assistance. A room designed with remote controls operated by a chin switch would be ideal!! A call button, entertainment center, radios, TV, VCR/DVD player, lights, stereo, etc Project 4: Personal Obstacle Detection System:  Project 4: Personal Obstacle Detection System Sponsor: VTC Enterprises Definition of the problem: Design a system that will help an individual who is blind avoid obstacles in the workplace Project 5: Vision-Based Localization System for Autonomous Vehicles :  Project 5: Vision-Based Localization System for Autonomous Vehicles Sponsor: Dr. Chris Clark This project will serve as part of a larger project, the Cal Poly Autonomous Transportation System (CPATS). The goal of the CPATS is to equip a group of Cal Poly golf carts with intelligent control capabilities so that they can autonomously transport students, staff, faculty and visitors around campus. This portion of the CPATS will involve vehicle localization - estimating the position of a vehicle within a global coordinate frame (e.g. campus). First, the vehicle state will be predicted with wheel encoder measurements. Then, a monocular vision system will be used to detect unique artificial landmarks and/or natural landmarks that can provide a direct measurement of the vehicle's state within the global coordinate frame. This measurement will be fused with the state predicted by wheel encoders to produce an optimal state estimate. The process should be displayed with a Graphical User Interface.

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