Site2014 stem careersphillips

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Published on March 20, 2014

Author: JenniferMiller2

Source: slideshare.net

Description

STEAM Career Interest Instrument

Alana S. Phillips Jennifer Miller University of North Texas Career Interests of Students in a STEAM Camp

Summer STEAM Camp Experience

Research Questions  Are STEM career interests of males different from females?  Are STEM career interests different by age group?  What are the primary factors that influence a career choice?

Population 3 12 6 8 5 3 1 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Age N = 38 27 11 0 10 20 30 M F Age

Instrument  STEM Career Interest Questionnaire (Knezek & Christensen, 2009)  Twelve questions, Likert-type responses – 1= strongly disagree to – 5 = strongly agree  Three parts – Supports (Part 1) – Education (Part 2) – Career (Part 3)

Instrument (cont’d) 1. I would like to have a career in science. 2. My family is interested in the science courses I take. 3. I would enjoy a career in science. 4. My family has encouraged me to study science. 5. I will make it into a good college and major in an area needed for a career in science. 6. I will graduate with a college degree in a major area needed for a career in science.

Instrument (cont’d) 7. I will have a successful professional career and make substantial scientific contributions. 8. I will get a job in a science-related area. 9. Some day when I tell others about my career, they will respect me for doing scientific work. 10. A career in science would enable me to work with others in meaningful ways. 11. Scientists make a meaningful difference in the world. 12. Having a career in science would be challenging.

RESULTS

Reliability  Cronbach’s Alpha (α) = .91 (Excellent)  Subscales (α) – Supports = .78 (Good) – Education = .87 (Good) – Career = .73 (Good)

Validity  Total Variance of Three Factors 74.03%  Communality values of all variables exceeded .65 (considered high)  Age and Family Factor (p=.039,Cohen’s d =.62)

Analysis by Age Group Factor/Age Group N Mean Std. Deviation Sig between grps Cohen’s d Supports (Part 1) Younger 22 3.31 1.11 Older 16 3.77 0.76 Total 38 3.5 0.99 1.63 0.483 Education (Part 2) Younger 22 3.44 1.07 Older 16 3.76 0.67 Total 38 3.58 0.92 0.303 0.358 Career (Part 3) Younger 22 3.91 1.01 Older 16 4.29 0.68 Total 38 4.07 0.9 1.99 0.441

Analysis by Gender Factor/Gender N Mean Std. Deviation Sig between grps Cohen’s d Supports Male 28 3.41 1.11 Female 10 3.75 0.51 Total 38 3.5 0.99 0.361 0.393 Education Male 28 3.54 1.03 Female 10 3.68 0.57 Total 38 3.58 0.92 0.693 0.168 Career Male 28 3.95 0.92 Female 10 4.4 0.77 Total 38 4.07 0.9 0.179 0.53

Results  Means on the subscales appeared higher for older students than younger and higher for females than males.  Item 4, “My family has encouraged me to study science” was rated much more positively by the younger students.

Discussion  Limitations of the study – Population – No pre/post test  Future research

References  Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciencies. Routle  DeVellis, R. F. (2011). Scale development: Theory and applications (Vol. 26). Sage.  Knezek, G. & Christensen, R. (2009). Career Interest Questionnaire, Retrieved from http://www.iittl.unt.edu/IITTL/newiittl/STEM/ CareerInterestQ.pdf  MacCallum, R. C., Widaman, K. F., Zhang, S., & Hong, S. (1999). Sample size in factor analysis. Psychological methods, 4(1), 84.  Tyler-Wood, T., Knezek, G., & Christensen, R. (2010). Instruments for assessing interest in STEM content and careers. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 18(2), 345-368.

Conclusion Questions?

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