SIS Nov 17, 2018 Effort

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Information about SIS Nov 17, 2018 Effort
Education

Published on November 13, 2018

Author: stevebarkley

Source: authorstream.com

Tapping Student Effort: Increasing Student Achievement: Tapping Student Effort: Increasing Student Achievement Steve Barkley November 2018 Tapping Student Effort: Increasing Student Achievement: Tapping Student Effort: Increasing Student Achievement Based on Steve’s book of the same title, this workshop is built around a belief that students cause student achievement. The teacher’s role is to tap, support and guide the student effort that creates the learning outcomes. You will examine the elements of ability, effort, goals and behaviors, pictures of success, and manageable tasks. In addition, Steve will examine the power of optimism for students and teachers. Behaviors that can be consciously practiced to motivate yourself and others are identified. School Change: School Change Source: Model developed by Stephen Barkley Change in Leadership Behavior Change in PLC and Peer Coaching Change in Teaching Behavior Change in Student Behavior Student Achievement Student Achievement: Student Achievement What is the definition of student achievement that drives the work of your leadership team? To what extent is the staff committed to that mission? Slide5: STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT GOALS ACADEMICS - knowledge and skills to be successful in school and life. LIFE SKILLS - aptitude, attitude and skills to lead responsible, fulfilling and respectful lives. RESPONSIBILITY TO THE COMMUNITY - attributes that contribute to an effective and productive community and the common good of all. Student Behaviors: Student Behaviors What student behaviors need to be initiated or increased to gain the desired student achievement? Student Achievement: Student Achievement When you identify your student achievement goals for improvement, what are some of the student behaviors you identify as being necessary for generating the desired learning? Outcome Behavior Indicators Production Behaviors Student Behaviors: Student Behaviors Outcome: Increased Vocabulary Production: Hear new vocabulary in teacher reading and speaking Conversation with others using new vocabulary Reading material with new vocabulary Writing for purpose that requires new vocabulary School Change: School Change Source: Model developed by Stephen Barkley Change in Leadership Behavior Change in PLC and Peer Coaching Change in Teaching Behavior Change in Student Behavior Student Achievement Slide10: Teacher Changes What changes in individual teacher practices are most likely to generate the changes we seek in students? Teacher Behaviors: Teacher Behaviors Teach the desired student behavior. Model the desired student behavior. Quality Learning: Quality Learning Identify a time that you observed an individual student engaged in deep quality learning. Quality Learning: Quality Learning Identify a time that you observed an individual student engaged in deep quality learning. How would you describe this student’s behaviors during the learning? Quality Learning: Quality Learning Identify a time that you observed an individual student engaged in deep quality learning. How would you describe this student’s behaviors during the learning? What do you think this student brought to this learning opportunity? Quality Learning: Quality Learning Identify a time you saw large numbers of students in a class engaged in deep quality learning. Quality Learning: Quality Learning Identify a time you saw large numbers of students in a class engaged in deep quality learning. What is similar and different from the example of an individual student’s deep engagement? Which of these were present in the examples you explored?: Which of these were present in the examples you explored? George Couros: George Couros Student Behaviors : Student Behaviors Active – Students are actively engaged in educational activities where technology is a transparent tool used to generate and accomplish objectives and learning. Collaborative – Students use technology tools to collaborate with others. Constructive – Students use technology to understand content and add meaning to their learning. Student Behaviors: Student Behaviors Authentic – Students use technology tools to solve real-world problems meaningful to them, such as digital citizenship. Goal-Directed – Students use technology tools to research data, set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, and evaluate results. How confident are you that these elements increase student achievement? Why?: How confident are you that these elements increase student achievement? Why? Active Collaborative Constructive Authentic Goal-Oriented How easy would it be to find students in your classrooms…: How easy would it be to find students in your classrooms… Active Collaborative Constructive Authentic Goal-Oriented With a partner or two work on this problem.: With a partner or two work on this problem. Seventy-two balls are to be placed into three containers so that there are three times as many in containers 1 and 2 combined as there are in container 3. Container 3 is to contain twice as many balls as container 2. How many balls will be in container 1? Here is another: Here is another What is the value of R if: Q + M = C; C + K = R; R + Q = S; M + K + S = 20; Q = 4 What elements in teaching generate these elements in learning?: What elements in teaching generate these elements in learning? How do you use these elements to increase student effort?: How do you use these elements to increase student effort? George Couros : George Couros So if we want to get to this idea of ‘empowering’ our students, we are not going to have to be the ‘sage on the stage’ or the ‘guide at the side’, but ‘ architects of meaningful learning opportunities ’. Understanding our students, their interests, abilities, and strengths, will help us better design learning that gets them to, as Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi describes, a state of “flow“. How does this impact student and teacher learning? What is required of us as leaders? http://trainugly.com/portfolio/learning/ : How does this impact student and teacher learning? What is required of us as leaders? http://trainugly.com/portfolio/learning/ Slide29: Effort x Ability Manageable Task = Success Providing Pictures of Success: Providing Pictures of Success Future Plans Updraft/Downdraft Goal Setting Aspirations: Aspirations …the ability to set goals for the future while maintaining the inspiration in the present to reach those goals. Slide32: Imagination Sets goals for the future but does not put forth the effort to reach those goals. Aspirations Sets goals for the future and puts forth the effort in the present to reach those goals. Hibernation Has no goals for the future and puts forth no effort in the present. Perspiration Works hard in the present but has no goals for the future. Aspirations Profile http://www.qisa.org/framework/aspirations.jsp High Low Present/Doing High Future/Dreaming Teacher Relationships With Students: Teacher Relationships With Students What impact do you think a teacher’s relationship with students have upon student achievement? The classics tell us that, in relationships, the one between teacher and student comes second only to the one between parent and child. Lisa See Expectations/Relationships Kleinfield : Expectations/Relationships Kleinfield How To Engage Students in Learning Vito Perrone: How To Engage Students in Learning Vito Perrone As part of my research for the Teaching for Understanding Project, I have asked students of all ages and levels of academic success to describe those occasions in educational settings when they were most engaged intellectually. Among the common elements they listed are: Students helped define the content. Students had time to wonder and to find a particular direction that interested them. Topics had a “strange” quality—something common seen in a new way, evoking a “lingering question.” Hook students’ interest by posing shocking questions:: Hook students’ interest by posing shocking questions: Is it better to kiss your girlfriend on the lips or lick her armpit? ( pathogenicity ) Why don't you have to plow your way through road kill to get to school? (decomposition) Where does your breakfast come from? (nitrogen cycle/ primary producers) What do a bottle of wine, cheese and a compost heap have in common? (fermentation) Bacteria live WHERE?! (digestion & symbiosis) What do diabetics and bacteria have in common? (genetic engineering) http://www.accessexcellence.org/LC/TL/buchanan/ Slide37: Teachers permitted—even encouraged—different forms of expression and respected students' views. Teachers were passionate about their work. The richest activities were those “invented” by the teachers. Students created original and public products; they gained some form of “expertness.” Students did something—participated in a political action, wrote a letter to the editor, worked with the homeless. Students sensed that the results of their work were not predetermined or fully predictable How To Engage Students in Learning Vito Perrone Slide38: Live Event Learning Textbook Simulation Real Life Manipulation Live-event Anatomy of a Life Event: Anatomy of a Life Event Multisensory Process Skills Relevance Real Consequences Emotion Real Environment Slide40: Live Event Activity Activity Activity Content -intended -incidental Process Skills -briefed -debriefed Assessment Engaging Students in Learning (proficient): Engaging Students in Learning (proficient) The learning tasks and activities are aligned with the instructional outcomes and are designed to challenge student thinking, resulting in active intellectual engagement by most students with important and challenging content, and with teacher scaffolding to support that engagement. The pacing of the lesson is appropriate, providing most students the time needed to be intellectually engaged. Engaging Students in Learning (distinguished): Engaging Students in Learning (distinguished) Virtually all students are intellectually engaged in challenging content, through well designed learning tasks, and suitable scaffolding by the teacher, and fully aligned with the instructional outcomes. In addition, there is evidence of some student initiation of inquiry , and student contributions to the exploration of important content. The pacing of the lesson provides students the time needed to intellectually engage with and reflect upon their learning, and to consolidate their understanding. Students may have some choice in how they complete tasks and may serve as resources for one another. Slide43: My optimism shows when Slide44: You know my optimism is low when you see Power of Optimism Alan Loy McGinnis: Power of Optimism Alan Loy McGinnis Research shows optimism can improve: Health Relationships Job Performance Income Test Scores Slide46: Optimism : a bright and hopeful feeling about life in which one expects things to turn out all right -the belief that there is more good than evil in life. McGinnis found that optimists: McGinnis found that optimists 1. Are never surprised by trouble 2. Value partial solutions 3. Believe they have control over the future 4. Plan for regular renewal 5. Have heightened powers of admiration 6. Interrupt their negative trains of thought McGinnis found that optimists: McGinnis found that optimists 7. Are cheerful even when they can’t be happy 8. Have an almost unlimited capacity for stretching 9. Build plenty of love into their lives 10. Share good news 11. Use their imaginations to rehearse success 12. Accept what cannot be changed Are never surprised by trouble: Are never surprised by trouble (Worst case scenario) Value Partial Solutions: Value Partial Solutions P P P P P P Slide51: Have Alternatives Consciously Practice Positiveness Celebrate Slide52: Have Alternatives Believe they have control over the future Plan regular renewal Have an almost unlimited capacity for stretching Accept what cannot be changed Slide53: Consciously Practice Positiveness Have heightened powers of admiration Interrupt their negative trains of thought Are cheerful even when they can’t be happy Use their imaginations to rehearse success Slide54: Unconsciously Talented Unconsciously Unskilled Consciously Unskilled Consciously Skilled Unconsciously Skilled Gordon’s (1974) Skill Development Ladder Gordon’s Skill Development Ladder The Art of Teaching Slide55: Celebrate 9. Build plenty of love into their lives 10. Share the good news WOW Slide56: Victims Sustainers Dreamers Winners

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