SHIPHOPE-Slavery200

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Information about SHIPHOPE-Slavery200

Published on February 22, 2007

Author: lancasterlibrary

Source: slideshare.net

Description

The Ship Hope’s Package Book is an original manuscript held in Lancaster Library’s collection. The book documents aspects of the vessel’s 1792 voyage.
Hope travelled the ‘triangular trade route’ from Lancaster, once Britain’s fourth largest slave-trading port. It sailed for the Cameroons, where it traded goods for slaves who were then transported across the Atlantic Ocean to the West Indies. Here the slaves were sold and commodities, such as sugar, purchased and brought back to England. Glimpses into this book give an insight into the brutal reality of the transatlantic slave trade.

SLAVERY 200 ~ The Ship Hope Package’s Book The Ship Hope’s Package Book is an original document from Lancaster Library’s manuscript collection. Handwritten in 1792, it chronicles aspects of the vessel’s voyages of that year. Glimpses into this book give an insight into the brutal realities of the transatlantic slave trade. THIS IS THE COVER OF Press ‘full’ THE SHIP HOPE’S PACKAGE BOOK Lancashire County Library and Information Service Lancashire - a place where everyone matters

SLAVERY 200 ~ The Ship Hope’s Package Book Pages 17 to 19 of the book shows a copy of a letter of appointment and instruction to the ship’s master, Captain Tobias Collins, dated 26th September 1791 in which he is instructed to sail from Lancaster to Guernsey to pick up a cargo of “sundry goods” and from there to the “River Cameroons” and, in any place he was “informed of or desired”, to trade according to specific instructions: you “you will not purchase any old slaves but such as are well grown young slaves from fourteen to twenty eight years age”. of age”. A DETAIL OF THIS PAGE IS NEXT Lancashire County Library and Information Service Lancashire - a place where everyone matters

SLAVERY 200 ~ The Ship Hope’s Package Book Lancashire County Library and Information Service Lancashire - a place where everyone matters

SLAVERY 200 ~ The Ship Hope’s Package Book The Hope set sail from Guerney on Saturday the 8th October 1791, on the Triangular Trade Route, taking its cargo to the Cameroon to exchange for Slaves and (as the letter further instructs): “As much Ivory and dead cargo As as you possibly can.”. It would then begin the second leg of the voyage, known as the ‘Middle Passage’, transporting the Slaves to the Caribbean, on this voyage its destination was Grenada. The Register of Merchant Ships 1787 from Heysham Customs and Excise tell us more about the Hope: “Hope of Lancaster, built Yarmouth 1779, Decks 2, Masts 2, Extra L aloft 72.2, Extra B. 26.8, Tons burthen 163, Square sterned ship, Figurehead. Owners Thomas Moore and Edward Salisbury, Of Lancaster Merchants with Luke Tyson of Basseterre St. Kitte, Merchant” Lancashire County Library and Information Service Lancashire - a place where everyone matters

SLAVERY 200 ~ The Ship Hope’s Package Book Amongst many lists and accounts of transactions written in the package book, on Page 31 is a list of goods that may be exchanged for slave “a prime man slave in the a Cameroon” A package of goods - pots, pans and earthenware purchased from merchants in Lancaster and the North West, guns and ammunition, beads and cowrie shells (a common currency in Africa at the time) were given for each slave. With the hold and ballast filled with saleable ‘dead cargo’ and the decks with purchased slaves, the Hope set sail on the Middle Passage. Lancashire County Library and Information Service Lancashire - a place where everyone matters

SLAVERY 200 ~ The Ship Hope’s Package Book The Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade was founded four years before the voyage of the Ship Hope, and in 1787 achieved its first victory when parliament passed the Dolben Act. This act was intended to improve the slave trade, not end it altogether. It restricted the number of slaves that could be carried on a ship according to its weight in tons. Yet the conditions in which the slave ship’s cargo was transported remained appalling. Sustained only on a diet of beans (according to Thomas Pennant in 1774, grown especially in the fields of north Lancashire as “food for negroes on slave ships”) purchased from John Smith greengrocer of Penny Street Lancaster, the men, women and children would sit or lay cramped and immobile for the months of travel through the heat of the tropics. Among the particulars of the Hope of Lancaster found in the Register of Merchant Ships is a record of the height between decks: “H. betw decks 4 feet” Lancashire County Library and Information Service Lancashire - a place where everyone matters

SLAVERY 200 ~ The Ship Hope’s Package Book On Page Two of the package is a copy of a brief letter from Captain Collins dated 10th May 1792. In it he states: “I am sorry to inform you that I have been very unhealthy having lost 20 slaves the whole of such died in the heat” But that: “I expect to put off in July having now 170 Slaves on.” A 1788 plan of the Liverpool slave ship, the Brookes. The illustration showed 482 men, women, and children tightly packed into the Brooke's hold. The accompanying description stated that, according to records, as many as 609 slaves had been transported within the same space on the same ship. Lancashire County Library and Information Service Lancashire - a place where everyone matters

SLAVERY 200 ~ The Ship Hope’s Package Book The average duration of a slave ship’s triangular "As shipbuilding and the cabinet business are the only manufactures there, he who journey was just over 12 months and the Hope has the most ships to build or repair, or he returned from the West Indies ladened with goods for the English market – sugar, cotton and who will lay out a few hundreds [of pounds] rum (all products of the hard labour of slaves in mahogany furniture, is most likely to who had previously travelled ‘the middle carry his election." passage’). An equally important cargo for a (T.H.B. Oldfield 1792) Lancaster slave ship was tropical hardwood, mahogany or ‘camwood’, the raw material for Lancaster cabinet makers such as Waring and Gillows. Much of Lancaster’s eighteenth century prosperity was, directly or indirectly, built on ships and trade, much involving slaves. At the time, Lancaster was England’s fourth largest slave port. “The new houses are peculiarly neat and handsome, the streets well paved and thronged with inhabitants busied in the prosperous trade to Guinea and the West A PAGE FROM LANCASTER’S Indies.” PORT TONNAGE BOOK 1759 (Thomas West 1770) Lancashire County Library and Information Service Lancashire - a place where everyone matters

SLAVERY 200 ~ The Ship Hope’s Package Book By 1792, the year of the Ship Hope’s voyage, The movement for the Abolition of the trade had Lancaster was in decline as a slaving and trading gathered pace in the last five years river port, eclipsed by the growth of Liverpool. Evidence presented to the Lords appointed for The Hope was sold to Jamaica in 1793. the 'consideration of all matters relating to trade Captain Collins’s career as a slaver continued. and foreign plantations' shows that in 1792 A bill of sale of slaves in Barbados for the around 74,000 slaves were being exported from Lancaster ship ‘Tom’ in 1794 shows it’s master Africa every year. British merchants were to be Tobias Collins: responsible for exporting about 50% of these. Petitions were organised, 519 petitions from every county in England, including one over 22 feet long with 20,000 signatures from Manchester, were presented to the Commons, the largest number ever submitted to the House on a single subject or in a single session. William Wilberforce, who led the campaign in the Commons, hoped mass petitioning of Parliament would abolish the slave trade. The strategy almost worked; in 1792 the House resolved by 230 votes to 85 that the trade ought to be gradually abolished, but but the bill is rejected by the House of Lords Lancashire County Library and Information Service Lancashire - a place where everyone matters

SLAVERY 200 ~ The Ship Hope’s Package Book Going deeper: A copy of ELDER, Melinda . - Lancaster and the African slave trade. - The Ship Hope’s Lancaster City Museums, 1991 . - (Local Studies; No. 14) . - Package Book M0102629LC & M0102746LC MS3738 can be seen at ELDER, Melinda . - The slave trade and the economic development of eighteenth-century Lancaster . - Halifax : Lancaster Library Ryburn, 1992 . – 1853310301 Lancashire SANDERSON, F. E . - Bibliographical essay : Liverpool and the slave trade : a guide to sources . - Historic Soc. of Lancs. Local Studies Libraries & Cheshire, 1973 . - M0016445LC have a wide range of resources to help you SCHOFIELD, M. M . - The slave trade from Lancashire and explore the history Cheshire ports outside Liverpool, c.1750 . - Historic Soc. of Lancs. & Chesh, 1977 . - M0016061LC of your family, your community and These items are available at the place where you are. Lancaster Library Go to: and other http://tinyurl.com/22r252 Lancashire Libraries to find out more. Lancashire County Library and Information Service Lancashire - a place where everyone matters

SLAVERY 200 ~ The Ship Hope’s Package Book Other useful links: The pages quoted in this presentation may be Lancaster’s Slavery Town Trail Guides viewed or downloaded from: http://tinyurl.com/2esfuf (a fast internet connection may be required) ‘Set All Free’ Local History Project: http://www.box.net/public/vq10c088un http://www.setallfree.net/local_history.html ( or at http://tinyurl.com/2wfu7z) Abolished? Lancaster Museums: http://tinyurl.com/36vaj3 Abolished? KS3 Resource Pack: Lancashire Libraries guide to http://tinyurl.com/2fgewp Exploring Slavery on the Image Credits: 200th Anniversary of Abolition Harvard College Library can be viewed at: New Haven Colony Historical Society http://www.slideshare.net/ Kingston upon Hull City Museums and Art Galleries Lancaster Maritime Museum lancasterlibrary/slavery200/ ( or at http://tinyurl.com/2qrebo ) Presentation written, compiled & designed by Paul Hatch The directory of Slavery200 web-links mailto: Paul.Hatch@lcl.lancscc.gov.uk is at: Assistant Reference Librarian http://www.linkagogo.com/go/Members/ Lancaster Library mailto: lancaster.reference@lcl.lancscc.gov.uk lancaster+library/SLAVERY+200 website: http://tinyurl.com/2e95oz ( or at http://tinyurl.com/278qdg ) Lancashire County Library and Information Service Lancashire - a place where everyone matters

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