service etiquette

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Published on January 29, 2008

Author: Vincenza

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Service Etiquette Refresher:  Service Etiquette Refresher Commissioned Personnel Center March 2007 Preface:  Preface This presentation covers some of the more common elements of service courtesy and etiquette practice. It is not to be used as the all inclusive source on the topics covered. All Corps officers have been provided a copy of Service Etiquette, by Oretha D. Swartz, and have access to NOAA Corps Directives at the url provided below. These publications should be referenced as necessary. Chapter 12 of the NOAA Corps uniform regulations may be found at: http://www.noaacorps.noaa.gov/cpc/procedures/directives.html Overview:  Overview Ranks Communicating Saluting Etiquette “Must Knows” Grooming Setting the Standard… Officer Ranks - Pay Grades:  Officer Ranks - Pay Grades Ensign Lieutenant (jg) Lieutenant Lieutenant Commander Commander Captain Second Lieutenant First Lieutenant Captain Major Lieutenant Colonel Colonel NOAA,USN, PHS, USCG * Army, USAF, USMC Pay Grade 01 02 03 04 05 06 * See Notes Page Flag Ranks - Pay Grades [per 33 U.S.C. 3028(a)] :  Rear Admiral (LH) (RDML) Rear Admiral (RADM) Vice Admiral (VADM) O-7 O-8 O-9 Flag Ranks - Pay Grades [per 33 U.S.C. 3028(a)] How They Compare:  How They Compare GS-7/9 GS-9/11 GS-12 GS-13 GS-14 GS-15 Ensign Lieutenant (jg) Lieutenant Lieutenant Cdr. Commander Captain Approximate Equiv. How They Compare (con’t):  How They Compare (con’t) Senior Executive Service (SES) Rear Admiral (LH) Rear Admiral Vice Admiral Communicating with Officers:  Communicating with Officers Use Sir / Ma’am when communicating with other officers along with rank: Admiral (Last Name) . . . Captain . . . Commander . . . Lieutenant Commander… etc. . . The commanding officer of a ship is always referred to as "Captain" regardless of rank to those under his/her chain while in command capacity. Always use rank of individual when referencing in a professional gathering (meeting’s, etc). Do not use first/nicknames until person states, “Please call me ….”. No “Yeah”….think of it as a 4-letter word! See notes page Communicating with Warrant Officers:  Communicating with Warrant Officers Although there are no warrant officer or enlisted ranks in NOAA, we often work alongside or frequent military installations. As such, it is important to recognize and communicate accordingly. Address a warrant officer (WO1) as “Warrant Officer ______ “, or chief warrant officer (CWO2, 3, or 4) as “Chief Warrant Officer ________.” You may also refer to Warrant, or Chief Warrant Officer as Mr. or Ms. (Last Name). Commissioned officers do not use Sir or Ma’am when interacting with WO’s or CWO’s. The following url contains insignia and rating on each of the services: http://www.defenselink.mil/specials/insignias/officers.html See notes page Communicating with Enlisted Personnel:  Communicating with Enlisted Personnel Address enlisted personnel in the paygrades of E-7, E-8, and E-9 informally as“Chief______” prefixed by “Senior” or “Master,” if appropriate. Introduce them formally as “Chief Petty Officer __________” prefixed by “Senior” or “Master,” if appropriate. Introduce and address petty officers in paygrades E-4 through E-6 both formally and informally as “Petty Officer_____________.” You aren’t required to change the form of verbal address (by last name) of personnel in paygrades E-3 and below. However, when introducing them, precede their last name by “Seaman,” “Fireman,” “Airman,” “ Constructionman,” and so forth, as appropriate. Commissioned officers do not use Sir or Ma’am when interacting with enlisted. The following url contains insignia and rating on each of the services: http://www.defenselink.mil/specials/insignias/officers.html Hand Salute Execution:  Hand Salute Execution "the right hand is raised smartly until the tip of the forefinger touches the lower part of the headdress or forehead above and slightly to the right of the right eye, thumb and fingers extended and joined, palm to the left, upper arm horizontal, forearm inclined at 45 degrees, hand and wrist straight; at the same time turn head toward the person saluted. To complete the salute, drop the arm to its normal position by the side in one motion, at the same time turning the head and eyes to the front” See notes page Saluting:  Saluting Salutes are usually rendered between 6 and 30 paces Salutes are exchanged when members first meet and again when the conversation is completed just prior to departing, Salutes must be rendered and returned to all members of the Uniformed Services, Confusion can arise if there are more than two people present and of different officer ranks. (see notes page), Saluting the Colors:  Saluting the Colors There are two daily ceremonies in which uniformed service personnel will salute the colors (national flag). The first is at the beginning of the day (@ 0800). This ceremony involves raising the national flag while the national anthem is played. The second is at "Sunset", and consists of lowering the national flag while "Retreat or the National Anthem" is played. During both situations if you are outdoors, you must stop what you are doing, face the flag or the direction in which colors are being held, come to the position of attention and render a hand salute. You must hold this salute until the last note of the music; then you may proceed. On Army and Air Force installations it is customary to stop your vehicle, get out, come to the position of attention, and render a hand salute if colors or retreat is sounded. On Naval or Coast Guard installations and colors or retreat is sounded, you must stop your vehicle and sit at attention until the last note of the music is sounded; then you may proceed. If you are in doubt as to sit at attention or exit your vehicle, it is better to be formal than disrespectful. Therefore it is recommended that you exit your vehicle, face in the direction where colors are being held, come to the position of attention and render a hand salute. Whether you are driving your vehicle or walking through a military installation, you should never dash under cover to avoid paying respect to the flag. Dependents and civilians should face in the direction where colors are being held and stand at attention (placing right hand over their heart is optional). Talking during colors or retreat is forbidden and considered disrespectful. Saluting the Colors (con’t):  Saluting the Colors (con’t) Honors to the national anthem at formal gatherings and civilian functions (e.g., BOTC graduation, Change of Command, sporting events, etc.) If indoors and in uniform: - Remain uncovered, stand at attention with arms at sides during playing of anthem. If indoors/outdoors and not in uniform: - Stand at attention – remove any hat or cap and hold them with the right hand over heart. Covers (No such thing as a military “hat”) Cover refers to wearing of the headgear. NOAA Corps only salutes when covered. Remove cover when indoors like in an office building, kitchens, libraries, dwelling, building lobby or airport. Covered walks and shelters open to the sides are considered outdoors, and thus you wear your cover. Remember, if you wear your cover, then the rules for engagement for saluting is in force. Never place a cover on an eating surface. :  Covers (No such thing as a military “hat”) Cover refers to wearing of the headgear. NOAA Corps only salutes when covered. Remove cover when indoors like in an office building, kitchens, libraries, dwelling, building lobby or airport. Covered walks and shelters open to the sides are considered outdoors, and thus you wear your cover. Remember, if you wear your cover, then the rules for engagement for saluting is in force. Never place a cover on an eating surface. Covers See notes page Other Etiquette “Must Knows” :  Other Etiquette “Must Knows” Standing at Attention - Execution: - Head erect and staring straight, - Heels together, feet turned out equally forming a 45 degree angle with the body weight resting equally on the heels and balls of the feet, - Keep legs straight without stiffening or locking the knees, - Hold body erect with the hips level, stomach in, chest lifted and arched, and the shoulders square and even, - Arms hang straight along the sides/seams; curling the fingers as if holding roll of quarters and thumbs pointing downward in line with garment seam. See notes page Other Etiquette “Must Knows” :  Other Etiquette “Must Knows” ”Attention on Deck” When a senior officer (05 and above) enters a space where he/she out-ranks the senior officer present, the first person recognizing him/her will call "Attention on Deck”. (it is appropriate to extend this courtesy to the current NOAA Administrator and Deputy Undersecretary in NOAA Corps gatherings) Unless specifically entering the facility to address the group, the senior officer should immediately respond with, "As You Were," and then proceed with his/her business. Other Etiquette “Must Knows”:  Other Etiquette “Must Knows” When “caught” If confronted by a senior officer about a remission in courtesy (whether true or not), it is usually advisable to stand at attention and receive the information offered without argument. When the senior officer has finished, the service member should salute (if wearing cover), and deliver an appropriate reply, e.g., "Thank you, Sir/Ma’am, I stand corrected," holding the salute until it is returned, or the senior officer departs. See notes page Other Etiquette “Must Knows”:  Other Etiquette “Must Knows” Handshake Shake hands upon being introduced or saying good-bye.  Always accept an extended hand.   If seated, rise when introduced to anyone and upon the departure of anyone.  Normally, the senior officer makes the first move in handshaking. Your handshake should be firm and confident. Look the individual with whom you are shaking hands directly in the eye. Riding: Riding in a car with other uniformed service members can be a common occurrence. The junior officer, enters first so the senior officer may enter last. If there are three persons traveling, the junior person will take the middle seat. The place of honor is always to the right, so the senior person will sit on the right. When it is time to disembark from the vehicle, the senior person gets out first followed by the next in rank and so on. Other Etiquette “Must Knows”:  Other Etiquette “Must Knows” Walking: When walking with two or more people (the senior person is always on the right). It is the junior person who is responsible for lining-up on the correct side of the senior officer (to the left). A couple of the more common violations: Jackets must be zipped at least 3/4 up Cell phone, PDA or pager for official business, while in uniform - the device shall not be visible from the front, and must be worn on the belt, aft of the right or left elbow. Authorized Leather name tag contains: NOAA Corps seal, last name, and “NOAA Corps”. Hands in pockets Grooming (Women):  Grooming (Women) A sharp uniform looks tacky on an officer who does not meet proper grooming standards. Your uniform is only a part of your overall personal appearance. Listed below are excerpts from NOAA Corps Directives Chapter 12: Hair will be clean and neatly arranged. When in uniform, back hair may touch but not fall below the lower edge of the collar. No hair shall show under the front brim of the combination or garrison cap. Pins, combs or barrettes similar in color to the individual's hair color may be worn. Hair ornaments such as ribbons are not authorized. Cosmetics, if used, shall be applied in good taste so that colors blend with natural skin tone and enhance natural features. Exaggerated or faddish cosmetic styles shall not be worn with the uniform. Jewelry, for both men and women, can include one ring per hand, plus a wedding ring (or  wedding ring set).  A necklace can be worn if it is not visible.  A total of one wristwatch and one bracelet can be worn. One earring per ear, centered on the earlobe, is authorized. Earrings shall be small gold-colored balls, pearls, or diamond stud as specified in the Directives. Grooming (Men):  Grooming (Men) A sharp uniform looks tacky on an officer who does not meet proper grooming standards. Your uniform is only a part of your overall personal appearance. Listed below are excerpts from NOAA Corps Directives Chapter 12: Hair will be neat, clean, and well groomed. Hair shall be no longer than 4 inches. Hair above the ears and around the neck shall be tapered from the lower Hairline upwards at least 3/4 inch and outwards not greater than 3/4 inch to blend with hairstyle. Hair may not touch the ears or collar, extend below eyebrows when headgear is removed, or interfere with the proper wear of uniform headgear. The bulk of the hair (the distance that the mass of hair protrudes from the scalp) shall not exceed 2 inches. Hair in front shall be groomed so that it does not fall below the band of properly worn headgear. Sideburns, if worn, shall be neatly trimmed and tailored in the same manner as the haircut. Sideburns shall not extend below the bottom of the earlobe, shall be of even width (not flared) and shall end with a clean-shaven horizontal line. Mustaches, if worn, will be kept neatly and closely trimmed. The face will be clean shaven. No portion of the mustache shall extend below the lip line of the upper lip. In addition, it will not go beyond a horizontal line extending across the corners of the mouth and no more than 1/4 inch beyond a vertical line drawn from the corner of the mouth. The length of an individual mustache hair fully extended will not exceed 1/2 inch. Handlebar mustaches, goatees, beards, or eccentricities are not permitted. Jewelry, for men can include one ring per hand, plus a wedding ring (or  wedding ring set).  A necklace can be worn if it is not visible.  A total of one wristwatch and one bracelet can be worn. Setting the Standard :  Setting the Standard The wearing of the NOAA Corps uniform should be a matter of personal pride to all NOAA Corps officers; placing hands in pockets, talking on a cell phone, smoking, eating, or drinking while in uniform as a pedestrian detracts from the appearance and is inappropriate. public display of affection (hand holding, embracing, etc.) while in uniform detracts from the appearance and is inappropriate. By setting the standards for honor, respect and commitment you set an example at your unit. An officer may be surrounded by people who have been allowed to become apathetic or unconcerned about their skill level or standards. The challenge is to change things. Set the standard. It is never easy to be willing to stand out and maintain the standards. But, who else will? The other guy is just that, the other guy. In Closing…….:  In Closing……. Impressions about the NOAA Corps are influenced by how we conduct ourselves both in and out of uniform. When in uniform and dealing with those outside our agency always remember you very well may be the only Corps officer the individual has ever met…..and we all know the expression about first impressions. Always use common sense and professional courtesy……and always err on the side of caution. And remember, CPC is available to assist for any questions or concerns!!

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