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sendintheclowns061

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Information about sendintheclowns061
Entertainment

Published on October 17, 2007

Author: Nellwyn

Source: authorstream.com

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“A clown is like an aspirin except that it works twice as fast.” :  “A clown is like an aspirin except that it works twice as fast.” - Groucho Marx Robert Gilbert © 2006 Send in the clowns:  Send in the clowns Research task for Drama NCEA 1.3 Achievement Standard: 90008 version 4 Demonstrate knowledge of a theatre genre or style through a practical presentation CONTENTS:  CONTENTS Introduction The Greeks The Romans The Middle Ages Comedia Dell’ Arte Elizabethan Circus Clowns Silent Film Era Modern Mime New Zealand Clowns Television Clowns Conclusion Bibliography End Show Introduction :  Clowns and clowning have been with humankind since the beginning of time; they have been an important part of every human’s life. So what is a clown? What is clowning? Dictionaries tell us part of the story: they define a “clown” as a buffoon, a jester, a professional entertainer in a play or a circus, who entertains by tricks, and jokes, a zany person. Nowadays, of course, we have television and film clowns and street theatre clowns as well as the clowns who perform in the traditional places such as theatres and the circus. Introduction Clowning in the first formal theatres – Ancient Greece :  Greek theatre arose out of the ritual pantomimes they used to honour Dionysos, the god of wine. The pantomime/dance of the satyrs – the first recorded examples of clowning – was called “komos'' (a revel) – the source of our word “comedy”. Click here to find out more about clowning in Ancient Greece Clowning in the first formal theatres – Ancient Greece Clowning and the theatre of the Roman Empire :  Clowning and the theatre of the Roman Empire It was the Romans who developed completely silent mime, possibly from a performer called Andronicus who lost his voice during a performance, continued the performance in mime alone and started a new and very popular fashion: pantomime. Click here to find out more about clowning and the Roman Empire. The Church allows drama a new role in the Middle Ages. :  It was in the 10th century that the skills of pantomime/clowning – later with dialogue added – became a regular part of church life: a means by which the church could “educate” its illiterate congregations. Click here to find out more about clowning and the Middle Ages. Or click here to find out about Court Jesters. The Church allows drama a new role in the Middle Ages. Commedia dell’arte:  In Italy, during the 15th century, the strands of theatre and pantomime combined into a new theatre form, the commedia dell’arte, which is still popular today. Their costumes and masks were similar to those used in Roman pantomime, e.g. Harlequin’s and Clown’s costumes. Commedia dell’arte Click here to find out more about comedia dell’arte. Shakespeare’s England :  In England in the 16th century, because of the popularity of the great playwrights of the Elizabethan period, e.g. Shakespeare, commedia groups stopped speaking and began to use only mime. Over the centuries songs, dance, acrobatics, aerial tricks, elaborate costumes and sets were added. Shakespeare’s England Click here to find out more about Elizabethan clowns. Circus clowns :  Because circus clowns performed in very large spaces they used acrobatics, special costumes and tricks. They also wore a special type of face paint or make-up: a white face with a large red nose and lips, and “tears” below the eyes. Each clown creates their own “style” of that make-up. Circus clowns Click here to find out more about circus clowns. Clowns of the silent film era :  Mack Sennett was one of the first comedy producers. He encouraged his performers to improvise in the style of the commedia dell’arte, but using really exaggerated slapstick. He was responsible for the careers of such great film clowns as Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd, and Buster Keaton. Clowns of the silent film era Click here to find out more about clowns of the silent film era. Modern mime clowns :  Modern mime clowns Mime clowning as a mainly silent art has been recovered and there have been many famous mime artists who have had a great influence on clowning. Mime performers are not always clowns; they use tragedy as well as humour to create their characters and scenes. Click here to find out more about modern mime clowns. New Zealand clowns :  New Zealand clowns We have performers in clowning in New Zealand also. “Mime International” uses clowning skills in their mime performances. Some contemporary street theatre clowns working in New Zealand are: Luke Deverey of Pantaloonery and Jonathon Acorn of Acorn Productions. Click here to find out more about New Zealand clowns. Television clowns :  There are many clowns who perform on television. The most famous of them is probably Rowan Atkinson, whose character, Mr Bean, uses traditional clown performance techniques but does not use the traditional clothing, make-up or situations. Television clowns Click here to find out more about television clowns. Conclusion:  Conclusion Bibliography:  Bibliography NCEA Internal Assessment Resource, Ministry of Education, 2004 http://www.animationfactory.com http://www.clownschool.net/History/Hbeginnings.html http://www.streetswing.com/histmain/z3mime.htm http://www.montreat.edu/dking/MiddleEnglishLit/NotesonMedievalDrama.htm http://www.jester.net/CourtJs.htm http://www.davidclaudon.com/arte/commedia.html http://www.clown-ministry.com/History/robert-armin.html http://www.johnshepler.com/articles/circus.html http://www.filmsite.org/comedyfilms2.html http://www.frenchculture.org/perfo/events/marceau/bio.html http://www.acornproductions.co.nz/ http://www.rowanatkinson.org/mr_bean.htm Acknowledgements:  Acknowledgements http://www.uselessgraphics.com/clowns4.htm - also available 'royalty free' at http://www.animationfactory.com Jester ('Blinking' animation created by R. Gilbert) http://www.thenoodlebowl.com/jesters/images/images/whitelady.jpg p.5 Greek Mask http://depthome.brooklyn.cuny.edu/classics/dunkle/comedy/ p.6 Roman Columns http://agrino.org/virtualcy/photos/apollon5.jpg p.7 Jester http://www.tki.org.nz/r/ncea/drama1_2Bv3_15mar03.doc p.8 Pulcinella http://xoomer.virgilio.it/Barudda/Maschere_Italiane.htm p.9 Globe http://www.clt.astate.edu/wnarey/Shakespeare%20Survey%20pictures/illustratio ns.htm p.10 Circus Clown (ed. R. Gilbert) http://artposters.net/posters/newart/hc753.jpg p.11 Charlie Chaplin (ed. R. Gilbert) http://history.sandiego.edu/gen/USPics12/chaplin-kid.JPEG p.12 Marcel Marceau (ed. R. Gilbert) http://www.un.org/ageing/marcelmarceau.htm p.13 Animated NZ Flag http://www.multimediapalace.com/wff/n/nz-flag.htm p.14 Mr Bean (ed. R.Gilbert) http://www.chez.com/bean/ P.15 Conclusion. Timeline http://www.clownschool.net/History/HISTORY.html

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