sc4wg2n0190 WTO FCC 433

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Information about sc4wg2n0190 WTO FCC 433
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Published on May 8, 2008

Author: Rainero

Source: authorstream.com

World Trade Organization (WTO):  World Trade Organization (WTO) WTO: Multilateral Agreements On Trade In Goods—Technical Barriers:  Clause 2.4 “Where technical regulations are required and relevant international standards exist or their completion is imminent, Members shall use them, or the relevant parts of them, as a basis for their technical regulations except when such international standards or relevant parts would be an ineffective or inappropriate means for the fulfillment of the legitimate objectives pursued, for instance because of fundamental climatic or geographical factors or fundamental technological problems.” Clause 3.4 “Members shall not take measures which require or encourage local government bodies or nongovernmental bodies within their territories to act in a manner inconsistent with the provisions of Article 2.” Clause 3.5 “Members are fully responsible under this Agreement for the observance of all provisions of Article 2. Members shall formulate and implement positive measures and mechanisms in support of the observance of the provisions of Article 2 by other than central government bodies.” WTO: Multilateral Agreements On Trade In Goods—Technical Barriers WTO: Multilateral Agreements On Trade In Goods—Technical Barriers:  Clause 5.4 “In cases where a positive assurance is required that products conform with technical regulations or standards, and relevant guides or recommendations issued by international standardizing bodies exist or their completion is imminent, Members shall ensure that central government bodies use them, or the relevant parts of them, as a basis for their conformity assessment procedures, except where, as duly explained upon request, such guides or recommendations or relevant parts are inappropriate for the Members concerned, for, inter alia, such reasons as: national security requirements; the prevention of deceptive practices; protection of human health or safety, animal or plant life or health, or the environment; fundamental climatic or other geographical factors; fundamental technological or infrastructural problems.” WTO: Multilateral Agreements On Trade In Goods—Technical Barriers Federal Communications Commission (FCC):  Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Slide5:  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: April 15, 2004 Lauren Van Wazer (202) 418-0030 FCC ADOPTS RULE CHANGES FOR IMPROVED RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS TO FACILITATE HOMELAND SECURITY EFFORTS Washington, D.C. – In an effort to increase homeland security and improve the efficiency of commercial shipping operations, the Federal Communications Commission today adopted a Third Report and Order (Order) that allows for the operation of improved radio frequency identification (RFID) systems for use in conjunction with commercial shipping containers. This action is expected to result in lower shipping costs and improved security at ports, rail yards and warehouses in commercial and industrial settings by enabling the contents of containers to be rapidly inventoried. These improvements will also help system users determine whether tampering with their contents has occurred during shipping. RFID systems use radio signals to identify items. Uses of RFID include electronic toll collection such as the E-Z Pass system and anti-theft tags. An RFID system consists of a tag mounted on the item to be identified and a device that receives information transmitted from the tag. The Commission’s rules permit RFID systems to be operated on a number of frequency bands, subject to limitations on their maximum signal level and transmission duration. These limitations constrain the range and information transfer rates of RFIDs. Slide6:  The Order increases the maximum signal level permitted for RFID systems operating in the 433.5-434.5 MHz band to facilitate more reliable transmissions with greater range than the rules previously allowed. The 433 MHz band is available for unlicensed operation in many countries around the world, thus enabling manufactures to produce a single model of a device for use in both the United States and other countries. The Order also increases the maximum permitted transmission duration for these RFID systems from one second to 60 seconds, resulting in a sixty-fold increase in the amount of data that can be transmitted, thus facilitating the scanning of the contents of an entire shipping container. To minimize the risk of interference to authorized communication services, operation of RFID systems with higher power and longer transmission duration is limited to commercial shipping containers in commercial and industrial areas. Action by the Commission April 15, 2004, by Third Report and Order (FCC 04-98). Chairman Powell, Commissioners Abernathy, Copps, Martin, and Adelstein. Statement by Chairman Powell. Office of Engineering and Technology contact: Mr. Hugh L. Van Tuyl, (202) 418-7506, e-mail Hugh.VanTuyl@fcc.gov. ET Docket No. 01-278 ­ FCC­ Slide7:  STATEMENT OF CHAIRMAN MICHAEL K. POWELL Re: Review of Part 15 and other Parts of the Commission’s Rules, Third Report and Order, ET Docket No. 01-278 With more than two billion tons of freight traveling through U.S. ports and waterways yearly, ensuring the efficient flow of goods while reducing the possibility of terrorism and fraud is no easy task. Today’s Third Report and Order allows a powerful new technology to help secure our ports while increasing productivity. Specifically, we change Commission rules to allow for the introduction of smart shipping containers that can detect intrusions and streamline the inventory process. When you consider that a trillion dollars worth of goods pass through our ports annually, the potential economic benefits of this technology become clear. It is worth noting that some have raised privacy concerns regarding the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. We are aware of these concerns, and stress that today’s ruling is narrowly tailored. The technical and operational rules we adopt today allow higher-powered/longer-duration RFID tag use on limited frequencies, and only in commercial and industrial environments. We also take steps to protect federal government radar sites from interference by requiring grantees of an equipment authorization for a 433 MHz RFID device to register their location and inform purchasers where the devices may or may not be used. I’m excited by the prospects for improved inventory control, lower costs, and increased homeland security that this technology promises to bring. Interoperability:  Interoperability The Layers of Logistic Units (Optically Readable Media):  Movement Vehicle (truck, airplane, ship, train) Layer 5 ISO TC 204 (None) AIAG B-15 Container (e.g., 40 foot Sea Container) Layer 4 ISO TC 104 (None) Layer 3 ISO TC 122/WG 4 (15394) ANS MH10.8.1 AIAG B-10/14 EIA 556-B UCC 6 / Genl EAN Spec Layer 2 ISO TC 122/WG 4 (15394) ANS MH10.8.1 AIAG B-10/14 EIA 556-B UCC 6 / Genl EAN Spec Layer 1 ISO TC 122/WG 7 (22742) ANS MH10.8.6 AIAG B-4 EIA 621/624 & IEC 62090 UCC 1 / Genl EAN Spec Layer 0 ISO TC 122 (TBD) ANS MH10.8.7 AIAG B-4 EIA SP-3497 UCC 1 / Genl EAN Spec The Layers of Logistic Units (Optically Readable Media) The Layers of Logistic Units (Radio Frequency Identification - RFID):  Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Pkg Pkg Pkg Pkg Pkg Pkg Pkg Pkg Transport Unit Transport Unit Transport Unit Transport Unit Unit Load “Pallet” Unit Load “Pallet” Container (e.g., 40 foot Sea Container) Movement Vehicle (truck, airplane, ship, train) Layer 5 Layer 4 (433 MHz, 860-960 MHz) ISO 17363 Layer 3 (433 MHz, 860-960 MHz) ISO 17364 Layer 2 (860-960 MHz) ISO 17365 Layer 1 (860-960 MHz) ISO 17366 Layer 0 (860-960 MHz) ISO 17367 The Layers of Logistic Units (Radio Frequency Identification - RFID) Note 433 MHz from ISO/IEC 18000-7 860-960 MHz from ISO/IEC 18000-6

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