s15038507_BLYTON_EDUC30103_Presentation_2018 [Autosaved]

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Published on October 19, 2018

Author: VanessaB99

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Slide1: Alcohol use within Indigenous communities Vanessa Blyton (s15038507) Slide2: Statistics “ADULT HEALTH: ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION”. (2010). “2.16 Risky Alcohol Consumption”. (2014). Origin of Alcohol Abuse: Origin of Alcohol Abuse ● Research has shown that Australian’s are most likely to drink alcohol. However, Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people are more likely to consume it at a dangerous high risk levels (Healey, 2004, p. 30). ● Indigenous Australians had minimal exposure to alcohol before the first fleet. After European settlement, “volume and availability of alcoholic beverages increased significantly”. (Wilson, Stearne and Saggers , 2010, p. 6). ● According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2011, p. 11), a number of factors have contributed to indigenous alcohol abuse including ”economic marginalisation, discrimination, cultural dispossession and cultural assimilation difficulties, family conflict and violence and family history of alcohol misuse”. Impacts: Impacts EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL ABUSE Impacts: Impacts EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL ABUSE Cardiovascular diseases Risk taking Financial problems Accidents and injury Mood swings Vision impairment Feel free to add to your mind map if you missed any! Depression Headaches and vomiting Impacts: Impacts EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL ABUSE Cardiovascular diseases Risk taking Financial problems Accidents and injury Mood swings Vision impairment Feel free to add to your mind map if you missed any! Depression Headaches and vomiting Foetal Alcohol Syndrome: Foetal Alcohol Syndrome ● Foetal Alcohol Syndrome is a extremely severe disorder which may be diagnosed after a mothers have consumed alcohol during pregnancy ( "2.16 Risky Alcohol Consumption”, 2014). ● Catterick, M, Curran L, and Riley E. (2014, p. 18) highlight that a child with FAS may experience issues with growth and their central nervous system as well as abnormal facial features. ● According to studies in the United States, 0.2-1.5 in every 1,000 births are considered to be FAS. ● It is not a genetic of inherited disorder. ● It is preventable by not drinking alcohol during any stage of pregnancy especially the first few weeks. ● There is no cure for FSC ( Langwith , 2011, p. 16). "FAS Part 2” (2013). Impacts on brain development: Impacts on brain development ● Newborns with FAS experience may experience a poor sucking response which will alter sleeping patterns and irregular sleep-wake cycle. ● Developmental milestones will be delayed such as rolling over, crawling, walking and talking. ● Behavioral issues and learning difficulties may arise during preschool or Early Stage 1 . ● Learning difficulties may include “poor attention span, hyperactivity, poor motor skills and slow language development” ( Langwith , 2011, p. 19). ● Furthermore, this may progress to “memory problems, poor judgement, difficulties with daily living skills and poor social skills” which may arise during primary school and high school ( Langwith , 2011, p. 20). "FAS Part 2” (2013). Innovation strategies Primary prevention: Innovation strategies Primary prevention ● According to Wilson, Stearne and Sagger (2010, p. 8), primary prevention strategies highlights the importance of preventing “the up-take of alcohol by non-drinkers and are informed by knowledge of risk and protective factors”. ● School and parent educational programs such as sporting, recreational and cultural activities. ● National Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Action plan was developed in 2014 for “Indigenous-specific prevention and promotion activities” ( “2.16 Risky Alcohol Consumption”, 2014). ● Limiting supply of alcohol (Wilson, Stearne and Saggers , 2010, p. 8). Innovation strategies Secondary prevention: Innovation strategies Secondary prevention ● Secondary prevention aims to decrease dangerous and chronic levels of alcohol abuse in order to enhance independence (Wilson, Stearne and Sagger , 2010, p. 9), ● According to Wilson, Stearne and Sagger (2010, p. 9), these strategies tend to be “provided through Aboriginal community controlled health and substance-use specific services”. ● Education and health promotion strategies ● Night patrols and sobering up shelters Innovation strategies Tertiary prevention : Innovation strategies Tertiary prevention ● According to Wilson, Stearne and Sagger (2010, p. 8), tertiary prevention strategies are used to “reduce the harms from use or enable reduction or cessation of use”. ● The main aim of tertiary prevention is treatment which can prevent criminal behavior and drugs use as well as increase physical and psychological health. ● Treatment can be addressed in primary healthcare, community or residential settings. ● Programs include “withdrawal management, cognitive behavioral therapies, brief interventions, inpatient detoxification, residential rehabilitation and aftercare services” (Wilson, Stearne and Sagger , 2010, p. 8), Slide12: References “ADULT HEALTH: ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION”. (2010). Australian Bureau of Statistics . N.p. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. (2011). Substance use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Cat. no. IHW 40.Canberra: AIHW. Catterick, M, Curran L, and Riley E. (2014). Understanding Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder . 1st ed. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. "FAS Part 2”. (2013). The Whole House . N.p. Healey, J. (2004).  Indigenous Health . 1st ed. NSW: The Spinney Press. Langwith, J.  Fetal Alcohol Syndrome . (2011). 1st ed. Farmington Hills: Cengage Learning. Wilson M, Stearne A, Gray D, Saggers S (2010) The harmful use of alcohol amongst Indigenous Australians. Australian Indigenous Health Bulletin 10 (3). “2.16 Risky Alcohol Consumption”. (2014). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2014 Report . N.p.

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