Roman Epigraphy : an introduction by John Bodel, Brown University

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Information about Roman Epigraphy : an introduction by John Bodel, Brown University

Published on June 6, 2016

Author: PUFProgramVisibleWords

Source: slideshare.net

1. Royal  University  of  Fine  Arts Phnom  Penh,  Cambodia 25  May  2016  

2. The  Periods  of  Roman  History Pre-­history            1200  – 754  BCE Regal                                753  – 510  BCE   Republic                      509  – 31  BCE Empire 27  BCE    – 476  CE Late  Antiquity      330    – 576  CE Byzantine 330    – 1453  CE

3. Roman  expansion   (500  BCE-­ 117  CE)

4. Numbers  of  Roman  inscriptions Regal  +  republican  period:         >  5,000 Imperial: 400,000  (Latin) + 50,000  (Greek) City  of  Rome   (population  ca.  100  BCE  – 300  CE:    1,000,000) 100,000  total  inscriptions 40,000  epitaphs

5. The  media  of  Roman  inscriptions stone (marble,  limestone,  travertine,  tufa,  ‘local’  stone) metal (bronze,  lead,  tin) clay  (terracotta) (before  and  after  firing) plaster (painted  and  scratched    [graffiti]) tile  tesserae (mosaic) wood (inked  leaves  and  waxed  tablets)

6. Texts on stone Stonecutter’s tools

7. block  capital  script cursive  script

8. ductus of  painted   capital   script cursive script

9. ligatures,  apices,  tall  and  small  letters,  special  signs,  numerals

10. Res  Gestae Divi Augusti (ca.  13  CE) “the  Queen  of  Inscriptions”  (regina inscriptionum) Theodor  Mommsen (35  paragraphs  +  Appendix,  more  than  4,000  words)

11. CIL VI 14179

12. CC CIL CIL X 1018 = ILS 5942Edict of T. Suedius Clemens (Pompeii,ca. 65 CE)

13. metal applied inlaid engraved molded scratched

14. Campus  Martius, Mausoleum  Augusti, and  Obelisk Rome

15. Horologium Augusti,  Mausoleum,  and  Ara Pacis

16. aes perenne lex  de  imperio Vespasiani

17. Curse  tablet (Bologna  ca.  300  CE) lead

18. ‘Instrumentum  domesticum’ lead  water  pipe  (fistula)  with  the  name  of  the  empress  Livia

19. slave  collars

20. Roman   brickstamps

21. texts  on amphorae

22. graffiti

23. paint  &  plaster

24. mosaic

25. MAGERIUS MOSAIC SMIRAT,  TUNISIA (Ca. 250 CE)

26. AE 1967,  549 = AE 2000,  1598  

27. Columbarium  of  C.  Scribonius C.l.  Menophilus Rome,  Villa  Doria Pamphili

28. Vindolanda, Britain (ca.  150  CE)

29. writing  tablets

30. http://usepigraphy.brown.edu/

31. Digital  resources Databases EAGLE  =  Electronic  Archive  of  Greek  and  Latin  Epigraphy  (the  official  database   project  of  the  international  organization,  AIEGL) http://www.edr-­edr.it/index_it.html Greek AIO  =    Attic  Inscriptions  Online  (Cardiff,  Stephen  Lambert) https://www.atticinscriptions.com/ IAph2007  =  Inscriptions  of  Aphrodisias (King’s  College  London,  J.  Reynolds,  C.   Roueché,  and  G.  Bodard) http://insaph.kcl.ac.uk/iaph2007/index.html IG  =  Inscriptiones Graecae (Berlin,  Klaus  Hallof et  al.)    (needs  password  available   upon  request) http://www.bbaw.de/bbaw/Forschung/Forschungsprojekte/ig/de/blanko.2007-­05-­ 04.9136476605 PHI  = The  Packard  Humanities  Institute   http://epigraphy.packhum.org/inscriptions/main

32. Latin ACE  =  Archivum Corporis Electronicum (Berlin,  CIL) http://cil.bbaw.de/cil_en/dateien/datenbank_eng.php EDB  =  Epigraphic  Database  Bari  (Bari,  C.  Carletti) http://www.edb.uniba.it/ EDCS  =  Epigraphik-­Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (Eichstätt,  M.  Clauss)   http://db.edcs.eu/epigr/epi_en.php EDH  =  Epigraphische Datenbank (Heidelberg,  [G.  Alföldy]  and  Francisca  Feraudi-­ Gruenais)   http://www.uni-­heidelberg.de/institute/sonst/adw/edh EDR  =  Epigraphic  Database  Roma  (Rome,  S.  Panciera) http://www.edr-­ edr.it/edr_programmi/res_complex_comune.php?lang=eng&ver=simp HispEp =    Hispania  Epigraphica (Alcalá,  Joaquín Gómez-­Pantoja) http://eda-­bea.es/

33. Other  internet  resources Societies AIEGL  =  Association  Internationale d'Epigraphie Grecque et  Latine http://www.aiegl.org/ ASGLE  =    American  Society  of  Greek  and  Latin  Epigraphy:   http://classics.case.edu/asgle/ BES  =  British  Epigraphy  Society:   http://www.britishepigraphysociety.org/ Other CoDE =  Center  of  Digital  Epigraphy  (Brown,  J.  Bodel  &  M.  Satlow) http://www.brown.edu/Research/CoDE/ CDS  =  Center  For  Digital  Scholarship    (Brown,  Eli  Mylonas) http://library.brown.edu/cds/ CSAD  =    Centre  for  the  Study  of  Ancient  Documents  (Oxford,  C.  Crowther):     http://www.csad.ox.ac.uk Center  for  Epigraphical and  Palaeographical Studies  (Ohio  State) http://epigraphy.osu.edu/ CLAROS  (concordance  of  Greek  inscriptions) http://www.dge.filol.csic.es/claros/cnc/3cnc.htm

34. Other  internet  resources Societies AIEGL  =  Association  Internationale d'Epigraphie Grecque et  Latine http://www.aiegl.org/ ASGLE  =    American  Society  of  Greek  and  Latin  Epigraphy:   http://classics.case.edu/asgle/ BES  =  British  Epigraphy  Society:   http://www.britishepigraphysociety.org/ Other CoDE =  Center  of  Digital  Epigraphy  (Brown,  J.  Bodel  &  M.  Satlow) http://www.brown.edu/Research/CoDE/ CDS  =  Center  For  Digital  Scholarship    (Brown,  Eli  Mylonas) http://library.brown.edu/cds/ CSAD  =    Centre  for  the  Study  of  Ancient  Documents  (Oxford,  C.  Crowther):     http://www.csad.ox.ac.uk Center  for  Epigraphical and  Palaeographical Studies  (Ohio  State) http://epigraphy.osu.edu/ CLAROS  (concordance  of  Greek  inscriptions) http://www.dge.filol.csic.es/claros/cnc/3cnc.htm

35. EpiDoc (digital  editing  conventions) http://epidoc.sourceforge.net/index.shtml Epilab =  Laboritorio di  Epigrafia (Trieste,  C.  Zaccaria and  M.  Hainzmann) http://www.univ.trieste.it/~epilab/ Fonti epigrafiche (Bologna,  A.  Cristofori):   http://www.rassegna.unibo.it/epigrafi.html USEP  =    U.S.  Epigraphy  Project  (Greek  and  Latin  inscriptions  in  USA)  (Brown,   J.  Bodel):     http://usepigraphy.brown.edu/ N.B.:    All  the  major  corpora  and  supplement  projects  (IG,  SEG,  CIL,  AE)  now   have  websites  where  recent  developments  are  reported.  In  addition,  many  of   the  world's  leading  museums  of  Greek  and  Roman  antiquities  are  in  the   process  of  making  the  epigraphic  materials  in  their  inventories  available  (in   various  forms)  at  their  websites.

36. FINIS

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