Rizal's Idealism Through Poetry and Letters

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Information about Rizal's Idealism Through Poetry and Letters

Published on October 6, 2016

Author: MeroSarade

Source: slideshare.net

1. Presented By: Robbie Liza Caytiles Marie Gold Tabuada Shena Jean Arcelon Judy Ann Alfonso

2. A. Rizal’s quotable quotes

3.  There can be no tyrants where are no slaves.  I wish to show those who deny us patriotism that we know how to die for our country and convictions  Ignorance is servitude, because as a man thinks, so he is, a man who does not think for himself to

4.  The tyranny of some is possible only through the cowardice of others  Filipinos don’t realize that victory is the child of struggle, that joy blossoms from suffering and redemption is product of sacrifice.  Youth is a flower-bed that is to bear rich fruit must accumulate wealth for its descendant

5.  Man works for an object. Remove that object and you reduce him into inaction  One only die once and if one does not die well, a good opportunity is lost and will not present itself again.  All men are born equal, naked without bond. God did not create man to be slave, nor did he endow him with intelligence to have him hoodwinked or adorn him with reason

6.  Without education and liberty which are the soil and the sun of man, no reform is possible, no measure can give the result desired.  To foretell the destiny of a nation it is necessary to open the book that tells of her past

7.  I die when I see the dawn breakthrough the gloom of night to herald the day, and if color is lacking my blood though shall take Pour ‘d out at need for thy dear sake, to dye with its crimson the walking ray ‘My last farewell’.

8. B. Leading Poems

9. Sa Aking mga Kabata He expressed his wish that native tongue should be cherished and enriched. Kapag ang baya’y sadyang umibig Sa kanyang salitang kaloob ng langit Sariling kalaya’ay nais rin magamit Katulad ng ibong nasa himpapawid

10. Rizal scorns those who refused to love their native language when he said: Ang hindi magmahal sa sariling wika Higit pa and amoy sa malansang isda

11. He expressed his wish that the native tongue should be cherished and enriched: Kaya’t and marapat pagyamaning kusa Na katulad sa inang tunay na nagpadala

12. He expressed his wish that the native tongue should be cherished and enriched: Kaya’t and marapat pagyamaning kusa Na katulad sa inang tunay na nagpadala

13. Apparently Rizal at an early age already felt that some of his countrymen have developed a colonial mentality to the prejudice of our native languages. Ang wikang tagalog tulad sa latin, Sa ingles, kastila at salitang anghel Sapagkat ang poong maalam tumingin Ang siyang naggawad,nagbigay sa atin

14. Ang salita nati’y huwad rin sa iba Na may alfabeto at sariling letra Kaya nawala’y dinatnan ng signos Ang lumbay sa lawa noong daking una.

15. Education gives Luster to the Motherhood He pictured education as the foundation of knowledge which gives endless glory: Wise education, vital breath Inspires an enchanting virtue She puts the country in the lofty seta Of endless glory, of dazzling glow

16. Through wise education, the youth is directed along the path of righteousness and goodness: It break’s immorality’s neck Contemptible crime before it is halted; It humbles barbarous nations And it makes of savages champion

17. For the Filipino youth He urged the youth to develop their talents and find out what genius would be proclaimed through out the world for having served the country: Run for genius sacred flame Awaits the artist’s crowning Spreading far and wide the fame Through out the sphere proclaiming With trumpet the mortal’s name

18. For the Flowers of Heidelberg Rizal found the inspiration in the beauty of the blooming flowers and fragrance of the woods. When upon the shore you alight, The kiss on you I press Place it on the wings of breeze That is may go with its flight

19. Hymn to Labor Teach us ye the laborious work To pursue your footsteps we wish, For tomorrow when country calls us We may able your task t finish. For the labor of man sustains Family home and Motherland

20. My Retreat It is my faithful friend, which hurts me ne’er Which when it sees me and always consoles my soles Which in my sleepless night watches me with pray’r With me, and my exile dwells in my sylvan lair It alone infuses me with faith when I’m doubt by all

21. The Song of the Traveler Perhaps in desert a grave he’ll find Of tranquility a refuge sweet; Unremembered of his country and the world He’ll rest in peace after suffering great

22. The Song of the Traveler Go traveler proceed on your way In your own native land a stranger thou art; Leave thou to others the songs of love To others the joys; you again depart. Go , traveler, don’t turn back your face for no one shall weep s you say adieu Go traveler and down your sorrows all, For your grief the world simply mocks at you.

23. Farewell, parents, brothers, beloved by me Friends of my childhood, in the home distressed; Give thanks that now I rest from the wearisome day Farewell, sweet stranger, my friend who brightened my way. My Last Farewell

24. C. The Unfinished Novel

25. Makamisa is an unfinished novel written by Jose Rizal. The novel has only one chapter. It runs only for ten pages and is handwritten with orthographic ancillary glyphs. Although written in a different language , its style, characterization and setting mirror those of Rizal’s two previous works, Noli me tangere and El Filibusterismo which he wrote in Spanish.

26. The original manuscript was found by historian Ambeth Ocampo in 1987 while he was going through a 245-page collection of papers. This draft was written in pure vernacular tagalog

27. D. Letter of Jose Rizal to young women of Malolos: Summary and Analysis

28.  “To the Young Women of Malolos” is an essay written by Jose Rizal while he was in London upon the request of Marcelo H. Del Pilar December 12, 1888, a group of 20 young women of Malolos petitioned Governor-General Weyler for permission to open a night school so that they might study Spanish under Teodoro Sandiko.

29. Fr. Felipe Garcia objected their plan so, the governor-general turned down the petition. However, the women still continued their petition of the school and they succeeded in obtaining government approval in a condition that Señorita Guadalupe Reyes should be their teacher. Del Pilar (who was in Barcelona) wrote to Rizal (who was in London) on February 17, 1889, requesting to send a letter in Tagalog to the brave women ofMalolos. Rizal sent the letter to Del Pilar on February 22, 1889for transmittal to Malolos.

30. Fr. Felipe Garcia objected their plan so, the governor-general turned down the petition. However, the women still continued their petition of the school and they succeeded in obtaining government approval in a condition that Señorita Guadalupe Reyes should be their teacher. Del Pilar (who was in Barcelona) wrote to Rizal (who was in London) on February 17, 1889, requesting to send a letter in Tagalog to the brave women ofMalolos. Rizal sent the letter to Del Pilar on February 22, 1889for transmittal to Malolos.

31. Rizal pays homage to 20 women of Malolos who desire to educate themselves. In this way, Rizal sees in these women a ray of hope in restoring the Filipino women’s dignity and worth. Rizal emphasizes the importance of Filipino mothers Rizal refers to different women in society: mothers, daughters, wives and even the unmarried ones.

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