RePRODUCE: an overview

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Information about RePRODUCE: an overview

Published on July 28, 2009

Author: heather_jisc

Source: slideshare.net

Description

This presentation was given as part of the Content in Education Strand on day one of the JISC Digitisation Conference (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/jdcc09). The audio for this presentation can be found here: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/avfiles/events/2009/06/contentineducation1.mp3 (10mins & 30secs into the audio).

RePRODUCE Programme Content in Education 28/07/09 | | Slide Heather Williamson, JISC eLearning Programme Manager A 12month programme where 20 projects developed and ran quality assured technology enhanced courses using reused and repurposed learning materials sourced externally to their institution. The modules were run with a real cohort of students.  http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearningcapital/reproduce

some of the lessons learned identification & selection suitability of resources for teaching & learning RePRODUCE issues associated with access & licensing

identification & selection

suitability of resources for teaching & learning

issues associated with access & licensing

identification & selection vast amount of confusion about copyright issues amongst academics – both those who are willing and those who are not willing to share materials. the skills needed to repurpose learning objects may dissuade other institutions from attempting to re-use content definite issue with in-depth quality when it comes to material that is available on a creative commons basis. There isn’t enough of it! lack of clear and consistent standard taxonomies and hierarchies for searching various repositories. Content is often not “what it said on the tin”. On the positive side: sharing content and resources in terms of social learning is growing - for example, the use of sites such as Delicious and Flickr is increasingly common RePRODUCE

vast amount of confusion about copyright issues amongst academics – both those who are willing and those who are not willing to share materials.

the skills needed to repurpose learning objects may dissuade other institutions from attempting to re-use content

definite issue with in-depth quality when it comes to material that is available on a creative commons basis. There isn’t enough of it!

lack of clear and consistent standard taxonomies and hierarchies for searching various repositories. Content is often not “what it said on the tin”.

On the positive side:

sharing content and resources in terms of social learning is growing - for example, the use of sites such as Delicious and Flickr is increasingly common

 Intute  Salmon’s ‘E-tivities’ framework  UWE and BATH research observatory  London Pedagogic Planner  National Data Archive  TechDis  X4L  REHASH project  Clinical Skills Online  eViP  JISC’s DesignShare, D4LD and LD4P projects  CETL for Reusable Learning Objects  London Pedagogy Planner  Jorum  repository related projects (Streamline and Persona)  Scottish Film Archive  Len Bird 3 C model to curriculum design  JISC digitisation programme 28/07/09 | slide selection of the resources used RePRODUCE

 Intute  Salmon’s ‘E-tivities’ framework  UWE and BATH research

observatory

 London Pedagogic Planner  National Data Archive  TechDis

 X4L  REHASH project  Clinical Skills Online

 eViP  JISC’s DesignShare, D4LD and LD4P projects

 CETL for Reusable Learning Objects  London Pedagogy Planner

 Jorum  repository related projects (Streamline and Persona)

 Scottish Film Archive  Len Bird 3 C model to curriculum design

 JISC digitisation programme

suitability of resources for teaching & learning while content has to be context-free to be reused, the act of reuse inevitably requires contextualisation. the producer of materials needs to work with both the module in mind AND future external usage For the student a range of views identified: from making no difference: “ prioritising reuse may not result in any significant difference in the learning experience from the student perspective” to a potentially negative impact: “ if students are ‘spoon-fed’ content resources or RLOs by tutors this could lead to the students not developing their own self-directed learning skills”. RePRODUCE

while content has to be context-free to be reused, the act of reuse inevitably requires contextualisation.

the producer of materials needs to work with both the module in mind AND future external usage

For the student a range of views identified:

from making no difference:

“ prioritising reuse may not result in any significant difference in the learning experience from the student perspective”

to a potentially negative impact:

“ if students are ‘spoon-fed’ content resources or RLOs by tutors this could lead to the students not developing their own self-directed learning skills”.

issues associated with access & licensing RePRODUCE projects often found it challenging to clear rights from other UK universities and public sector organisations rights status of content created and hosted by is often unclear – staff have moved, lack of policy, lack of documentation gentleman’s agreements vs formal arrangements generally an absence of clear rights statements especially around non-personal educational use ambivalence and opposition to permission for use and re-use identifying people with responsibility and ability to grant permissions and make decisions future work: Open Educational Resources Programme: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/oer RePRODUCE

RePRODUCE projects often found it challenging to clear rights from other UK universities and public sector organisations

rights status of content created and hosted by is often unclear – staff have moved, lack of policy, lack of documentation

gentleman’s agreements vs formal arrangements

generally an absence of clear rights statements especially around non-personal educational use

ambivalence and opposition to permission for use and re-use

identifying people with responsibility and ability to grant permissions and make decisions

future work: Open Educational Resources Programme:

http://www.jisc.ac.uk/oer

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