Repositioning High-Fidelity Turntables to Hip Professionals

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Information about Repositioning High-Fidelity Turntables to Hip Professionals
Business & Mgmt

Published on August 4, 2009

Author: ericaswallow

Source: slideshare.net

Description

To take advantage of resurgence in vinyl record sales, our group has researched the feasibility of repositioning Rega turntables to a younger segment of “hip professionals.” As digital music, both purchased and stolen, has acquired a vast market share among our target audience, the greatest challenge is convincing consumers their investment in a Rega turntable will provide enough utility. Focus groups show that price and convenience are the two largest factors in purchase decision-making for our target of relatively affluent urban audiophiles. Thus, we will be highlighting the hedonic musical experience associated with turntables, while selling the product at a competitive price. We plan to communicate the terminal values Rega offers by using visuals that portray social praise and the ability to become an opinion leader in one’s reference group. Ultimately, this retro brand can be revived through effective marketing.

All materials were created by Ariel Bitran, Cheryl Neoh, Jeremiah O’Neil, Erica Swallow and Andrew Wong.

Repositioning High-Fidelity Turntables to Hip Professionals December 6, 2008 Consumer Behavior C55.0002 Tuesday / Thursday 3:30 – 4:45 Ariel Bitranab2490@nyu.eduCheryl Neohlxn201@stern.nyu.eduJeremiah O’Neiljeremiah.oneil@nyu.eduErica Swallowericaswallow@gmail.comAndrew Wongandrew.wong@nyu.edu I. Executive Summary To take advantage of resurgence in vinyl record sales, our group has researched the feasibility of repositioning Rega turntables to a younger segment of “hip professionals.” As digital music, both purchased and stolen, has acquired a vast market share among our target audience, the greatest challenge is convincing consumers their investment in a Rega turntable will provide enough utility. Focus groups show that price and convenience are the two largest factors in purchase decision-making for our target of relatively affluent urban audiophiles. Thus, we will be highlighting the hedonic musical experience associated with turntables, while selling the product at a competitive price. We plan to communicate the terminal values Rega offers by using visuals that portray social praise and the ability to become an opinion leader in one’s reference group. Ultimately, this retro brand can be revived through effective marketing. II. Project Definition and Goals During the 1960s and 1970s, the vinyl record was the most popular format for music distribution. New recording techniques allowed the mass production of vinyl records, launching the golden age of the audiophile. This era ended in the 1980s and 1990s when studios developed new music formats; rich and warm analog sound soon gave way to cold and flat digital music. Yet, within the past decade, vinyl records have made a comeback along with the turntables necessary to play them. Accordingly, we have decided to reposition Rega turntables to a younger urban market of “hip professionals,” the new consumers of vinyl records. Rega’s turntables can address four consumer needs: access, quality, socialization, and respect. First, high-fidelity turntables grant consumers access to analog music. Rega can satisfy customers’ needs to play new records by repositioning complementary products. Second, modern audiophiles often describe analog sound as being of unmatched quality, a major selling point. Third, consumers can use record players to satisfy social needs. Unlike the iPod’s solitary music experience, turntables play music for group enjoyment. Fourth, turntable ownership symbolizes trendiness and musical expertise, garnering respect for young audiophiles. For our project, we worked to resolve several key issues associated with Rega’s repositioning strategy. First and foremost, our research considers how consumers perceive this need-gap and whether they regard turntables as a potential solution. Along these lines, our report also describes the target market’s current attitudes towards turntables and where these consumers acquire information to evaluate audio technology. Our work also considers how consumers listen to music and how consumption contexts can influence equipment used. Finally, we describe the strategic implications for Rega and its positioning against potential competitors. III. Preliminary Industry Investigation Recently, the vinyl record industry has seen an unprecedented resurgence. After LP sales hit a record low in 2006, the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry reported that global sales doubled during 2007 from 3 million to 6 million units (Winneker). Domestically, the Recording Industry Association of America reports 1.3 million records were sold in 2007, 36.6% more than in 2006 (Newman). As a result, turntable sales grew nearly 80% during this same time period (Winneker). To exploit this potential revenue stream, artists like Madonna, U2, Coldplay, and Metallica are releasing vinyl records for both back catalogs and new hits. Moreover, retailers like Best Buy, HMV, Virgin, and Amazon.com are beginning to stock LPs alongside their CDs. Rega Research Limited, a premier British maker of contemporary turntables and high-end audio equipment, is poised to take advantage of this trend. Since Rega’s launch in 1973, product lines have included amplifiers, speakers, tuners, and its legendary turntables (“History”). The company’s current turntable models range from the entry-level P1 to the high-end P9, and its tonearms are highly regarded for quality performance for a low cost (Stereophile; “History”). Currently, Rega uses minimal advertising and direct marketing communications; it instead relies upon a small number of specialty dealers to market and distribute its turntables (“Wolfson”). Few competing manufacturers have launched repositioning campaigns for a mainstream youth market. Rega’s competitors are best classified by their level of price and quality. On the low-end, the Numark PT-01 features simple construction and portability that make it fun for amateurs, while the Pro-ject Debut III offers a low-cost and effective way to combine analog and digital worlds through USB ports (Pell). Priced closely to Rega’s P1, the Technics SL1200 MkII is a high-quality and durable unit targeting aspiring DJs. Though Technics’ positioning has been towards professional buyers, its host of youth-oriented music events could help Panasonic target a more mainstream audience (“Events”). Finally, high-end models include the Roksan Radius5 and the Michell GyroDec, which provide top-quality sound and engineering, often for more than $1,000 (Pell). These turntables are sold through distributors; direct-to-consumer advertising is limited and youth markets remain untapped.Substitute goods include a variety of audio equipment like personal stereos, component stereos, computers, CD / cassette players, and MP3 players. Rega’s greatest threat comes from Apple’s iPod, which captures 71% of the market for digital music players (“Life Beyond”). Priced competitively from $49 to $399 and appealing to young listeners, the iPod’s compatibility with a various speaker systems makes it benefits relatively similar to a turntable’s (“Apple Store”). Two other noteworthy substitutes include Sony’s lines of Walkmans and stereos for general audience use and Bose’s high-end digital systems for affluent experts. Ultimately, Rega’s main competition will come from outside the core turntable industry. IV. Nature of Targeted “Hip Professionals” We plan to target relatively affluent urban audiophiles, aged 18 – 34, who are willing to experiment with this growing trend. These consumers are young, progressive, socially active, and influential among their peers. They may currently be college students or up-and-coming professionals, but they still invest considerable time and money in clothing, culture, and causes that help them stand apart. Self-expression through sketching, blogging, and other creative pursuits is encouraged by their participation in both online and offline communities. Similar to traditional hipsters, these consumers stand apart by embracing non-mainstream trends like alternative music and vegetarian/vegan foods. The experiential qualities of goods and services are valued above price, making the rich sounds of analog music an appealing draw. Our target enjoys music-oriented magazines like FADER and websites like Pitchfork. Publications like Nylon and Radar are also popular. This group is likely comprised of Enterprising Young Singles and Twentysomethings under ACORN segmentation and Young Literati and a Bohemian Mix under PRIZM segmentation. Furthermore, our target has high levels of education and income, ensuring that that they have the purchasing power necessary to invest in a turntable. V. Focus Group Selection and Execution Focus groups interviewed samples of 5 to 8 hip professionals including men and women ages 18 – 34. For two sessions, we obtained a convenience sample of people shopping at music retailers like Union Square’s Virgin Megastore who met the outward description of our target market. Another focus group consisted of slightly older participants familiar with the music industry. Finally, we solicited participation from NYU students living in music-oriented floor communities through two separate focus groups to obtain the perspectives of younger members of our target market. There was little variance between focus groups, and facilitators asked questions from our Moderator’s Guide (Appendix A) and exposed participants to the concept statement (Appendix B). We asked permission to make audio recordings, which helped when transcribing participants’ comments (Appendix C). After each session, we distributed a questionnaire to obtain more information about the focus group participants (Appendix D). VI. Focus Group Results by Area of Inquiry 1.)Where do you purchase your music? What medium do you usually buy? The majority of respondents do not purchase music. Instead, participants acquire music through illegal downloading via file sharing clients like LimeWire. However, respondents dislike the risk of viruses, time costs, and guilt. Purchasers obtain music from buying CDs at electronics retailers or downloading MP3s through Apple’s iTunes. Reasons for purchasing CDs include supporting artists, owning tangible music, and attaining limited edition songs only found on CDs. iTunes users purchase downloads because they find it convenient, despite Apple’s Digital Rights Management system; there is little search cost and users can quickly download entire albums. 2.)What qualities do you look for in the music that you listen to? Many respondents look for interconnectedness between their music and the relationships between music artists. Most respondents look for music that fits their mood and taste at a given moment, often corresponding with an activity. For example, a quick tempo creates a mindset for exercising whereas soft tones create a soothing environment for studying. It is inferred that actively listening to music—listening without allowing other distractions—is becoming rare. 3.)Please describe the atmosphere under which you listen to music. When participants describe their general listening environment, they note two opposing situations: total isolation or social settings. When listening to music aloud alone, the platform is usually a laptop or personal computer. In social settings, on the other hand, music is used to generate socializing activities like dancing and singing with computer or iPod speakers. 4.)Where do you get information about music? What about audio technology? Participants get information about music from various sources, most important of which was word-of-mouth. Online user generated content sources include Wikipedia, social networks like Facebook, and blogs like PerezHilton. Preferred online recommendation systems include Pandora and iMeem. Although print is giving way to the Internet, Rolling Stone is still respected. However, television channels like VH1 and MTV are no longer used for music information. Sources for audio technology information are even more varied. People use sites like the New York Times, CNN, music blogs, and reviews on retailers’ sites. Several participants obtain information from trade publications like Stereophile and Soundstage. Respondents were also open to introductory announcements from vendors. Again, word-of-mouth is very influential. 5.) What kinds of audio technology do you own? When do you use each kind? Participants own various types of audio technology, with almost all catering to the digital music experience. Common examples include the iPod and other MP3 players, the iHome, laptops, speakers, and headphones. Although some respondents own CD players, radios, and boomboxes, they no longer use them because these technologies have become obsolete. 6.)Describe your experiences with and attitudes towards turntables and vinyl records. Participants had a very positive impression of turntables. One group referenced their nostalgia and history. The 1950s and 1960s, the Beatles, and other iconic music artists lent a “cool and retro” aura to the device, and its simplicity was appealing. Though many participants had a strong connection with the turntable, few people had heard one play. Most impressions came from exposure to period films and cues taken from parents’ and grandparents’ stories. A second group of participants learned of turntables from modern disc jockeys (DJs). Participants who associate turntables with DJs see turntables as a contemporary, urban, and “hip.” 7.)What is your reaction towards Rega’s turntable line? After presenting the concept, initial reactions were mostly favorable. Several people said the idea of owning a turntable like a DJ was “classy,” but no one referenced the specific benefits stated in our concept statement. Moreover, most positive comments were about the device’s color, design, and decorative potential. Hedonic benefits trumped functionality. Unfortunately, commentary generally grew less favorable as participants focused on how they would integrate a turntable into their lives. Switching costs were key—many people cited their incompatibility with digital music, lack of playlist functionality, inability to shuffle songs, and limited portability as challenges to overcome. Opportunity costs from searches for records were another concern. Yet, a few participants could envision buying a turntable. Most of them felt that owning a record player would be more realistic when they were older professionals with apartments. Turntables could also make a great gift for less technologically savvy parents. 8.)How would listening to a Rega turntable compare to other popular technology? Would you consider purchasing a Rega turntable? Why or why not? Participants agreed that Rega turntables would provide a more experiential and active listening experience that was described as “classy.” Overall, social gatherings seemed to be the venue where buyers could extract the greatest value, as a turntable would facilitate communal music enjoyment and serve as a conversation piece that could garner respect for owners. Yet functional drawbacks prevailed. “The sound would be much better,” said one person, “but the convenience wouldn’t be good at all. […] I wouldn’t consider getting one.” Several participants cited learning barriers and incongruities with digital music playback conventions as major obstacles. Despite our survey’s finding that participants felt the listening experience would be moderately different from that of other music equipment, turntables rank ahead of only portable CD players in enjoyableness (Appendix D). In purchase likelihood, they ranked last. However, participants indicated that purchasing a turntable might be more likely as adults. 10.)In which price range would you place Rega’s turntables? Though several respondents would only spend $30 to $50 for a record player, most priced a Rega turntable between $200 and $300. Many people specifically referenced the iPod and other MP3 players as a source of their reference price. Industry insiders had more experience with complex music equipment and placed a Rega turntable’s value in the $300 to $400 range. On the whole, respondents felt that a Rega turntable may be too expensive for their present budget, especially when considering the purchase of complements like speakers and records. Several people felt purchase was more likely once they have “a good stable home and a steady income.” VII. Implications for our Marketing Strategy A.Product The Rega turntable line starts with the P1 and rises in quality up to the P9. Many consumers cited switching costs associated with new learning as key purchase barriers, so our marketing would focus on Rega’s entry-level P1 turntable. Users can activate this model with a simple on/off button. Moreover, the product is sold with a detailed instructional guide and with most settings already preset for the user. We would also update Rega’s website to include more easily accessible information about turntable operation, technical support, and locating compatible equipment. All Rega turntables come with a 3-year warranty that we will emphasize to reduce the financial risk and value barriers that focus groups referenced. Target consumers expressed interest in using turntables as conversation pieces to obtain social praise. Accordingly, we would maintain the P1’s sleek design while imbuing it with the P3’s more vibrant selection of color including Saffron Yellow and Posy Pink. The buyer can also purchase a glass platter upgrade and colored mat to complement the turntable’s finish. All design options would be available on Rega’s website to allow for model customization. B.Promotion Focus groups show our target obtains information about music and music technology from various sources (Appendix C). To target music aficionados, we would break with Rega’s traditional marketing tactics and run a direct-to-consumer print campaign in music magazines like Rolling Stones and Spin as well as in trade journals like Stereophile and The Absolute Sound. In terms of new media, we could advertise in online versions of such publications and promote the P1 on Rega’s website by offering additional product and pricing information. Our target market also indicated that advertising on social networks like MySpace and Facebook could be effective. Television ads would likely be cost ineffective. Non-traditional communications would include updating Rega’s sparse Wikipedia page and leveraging music blogger influence by persuading them to write favorable reviews. Thus, we could generate product awareness and boost brand credibility in media our target extracts music information from. As our target market values experiences, we would organize publicity events like casual lounge parties where target consumers can mingle, watch demonstrations, and even test the P1 themselves. Playing off consumers’ desires to use turntables as conversation pieces, Rega could forge partnerships with members of the design community such as artists, fashion designers, or architects to create limited edition turntables. Furthermore, we would collaborate with artists to use Rega turntables and record sleeves as art installations in venues like the Museum of Modern Art. Other promotions could entail product placement in congruous films, television shows, and sound expositions. With strong competition from Apple’s iPod (Appendix D), relationship marketing is essential to ensure Rega creates long-term brand engagement. Superior technical support would help consumers overcome complexity barriers and develop a rapport with a relatively unknown brand. Brand ambassadors nested within retailers would also allow for easy outreach. Modifying some of the publicity events mentioned above for current owners could give consumers an enjoyable experience that provides Rega opportunities for up-selling. And finally, co-branding with record labels to create promotions, like sending owners a free record their birthdays, would provide inexpensive reminder advertising that could please consumers. Thematically, Rega’s promotions must stress three key elements. First, it must contrast the roles of turntables and iPods. Our survey showed iPods are the most enjoyable, desirable, and commonly owned music technology (Appendix D). Respondents felt turntables lacked the iPods’ digital music compatibility, playback functionality, and portability. As a result, our messages must show how turntables can complement existing music equipment rather than replace it. Ads can portray usage situations—commuting, exercising—where listeners use an iPod and transition into new situations—socializing, group studying—where they use a turntable instead. If buyers see they can own both products, existing digital music libraries will retain value and turntables would no longer be expected to replicate all the iPods’ features. Second, messages must stress records’ hedonic benefits in a relatable way. Our concept statement focused on functional benefits, but participants spoke positively about record players in the emotional context of nostalgia and DJs. Nostalgia might activate negative associations with classical music and highlight its anachronistic nature. Instead, ads should use the DJ appeal and depict social settings where turntables allow communal enjoyment of modern music and act as conversation pieces to garner respect for owners. This approach clearly necessitates speaking to the ideal self based on the id, selling the fantasy of social preeminence. Rega’s current advertising stresses instrumental goals by focusing on product features and their utilitarian benefits (Appendix E). Targeting the id would require advertising oriented towards terminal goals of escapism and social success. As a result, ads would symbolically show social situations where turntable owners reap the hedonic benefits of purchase (Appendix F). And to emphasize these benefits, Rega should use a normative approach that depicts’ our target’s reference group as offering positive reinforcement by praising owners to justify purchase. Third, promotions should show the accessibility of turntables and vinyl records because focus group participants were deterred by search costs. A small amount of each message should mention where consumers can find records and Rega turntables, either though a specific retail partner like Virgin or through Rega’s online store. Rega’s website should also describe how to operate turntables, as respondents indicated learning costs were another barrier to purchase. Our strategy also entails sales promotions to entice listeners. First, records today usually include digital tracks that allow buyers to enjoy the same music on their iPods. Distributors could communicate this feature to reduce turntables’ perceived performance and value risks. Secondly, we would bundle a free vinyl album with each turntable purchase, perhaps in partnership with up-and-coming artists. This promotion could help counter turntables’ antique image and allow consumers to feel greater purchase satisfaction by giving their new product an immediate use. Higher satisfaction would lead to favorable word-of-mouth and ultimately additional sales. C.Pricing The Rega turntables cover dispersed price points ranging from $350 for the P1 to $4,595 for the P9. Because our target uses the iPod as a reference price, we will advertise the P1 model and its relatively comparable price to lure the younger market. To satisfy our audience’s design needs, we would make the P1 available in pantones and add a colored platter mat for $50. With these features, our hip professional-oriented Rega P1 will cost just over $400 (Stereophile). For high-quality turntables, this price would actually be considered a penetration strategy because it undercuts major industry competitors to capture price-sensitive, value-conscious consumers. However, purchasing a turntable can become more expensive as customers acquire other components to assemble a completely functioning system. We would recommend a less expensive selection for our price sensitive consumers. The Rega Brio 3 integrated amplifier is available at $645 and the Rega R1 loudspeakers cost $545. Cable components can be found inexpensively at local audio stores. Accordingly, the total cost for a full-functioning turntable system by Rega will be $1,590. Nevertheless, this price could be significantly reduced if buyers search for lower cost components on virtual markets. While we plan not to advertise this fact, this information will be available on Rega’s website to help consumers educate themselves. D.Placement Rega is currently distributed by The Sound Organisation, which will continue to deliver the product to hi-fi dealers. Since Rega’s repositioning necessitates reaching a new audience, we would select venues with larger customer bases. Focus group participants indicated that selling through big-box retailers like Circuit City and the Best Buy would cut against the grain of Rega’s anti-digital image. Furthermore, the terminal values embodied in a Rega turntable might indicate consumers have more hedonic shopping movies that are incompatible with the image of such mass merchandisers. As a result, Rega’s P1 would be sold in independent and mainstream record stores like Amoeba Music or Virgin to increase the brand’s exposure to young audiophiles and the mainstream market in the proper context. Finally, Rega would launch a consumer-direct online store where users can fit turntables to their aesthetic and monetary needs. VIII. Conclusion Clearly the success of Rega’s repositioning strategy depends upon its ability to overcome the obstacles it faces in reaching its target. Considering the prevalence of digital music and resultant behavior explored in our research, Rega must show that its turntable does not only fit in consumers’ lives, but that it also represents an integral component missing from their music listening experience. Effectively communicating this main idea to hip professionals regarding the P1 turntable with precise promotion, competitive pricing, appropriate distribution, and customized offerings will ensure that Rega achieves strategic marketing success. Appendix A: Moderator’s Guide A.Questions about Current Music Marketplace 1.Where do you purchase your music? What medium do you usually buy? 2.What qualities do you look for in the music that you listen to? 3.Please describe the atmosphere under which you listen to music. 4.Where do you get information about music? What about audio technology? 5.What kinds of audio technology do you own? When do you use each kind? 6.Describe your experiences with and attitudes towards turntables and vinyl records? B. Introduction of Concept Statement Rega, a hi-fidelity turntable company, is considering marketing their line of record players to a younger, urban audience. Rega’s turntables provide access to a higher quality musical experience, through use of vinyl records and their rich, analog sound. The line will be sold in mass market and independent music stores, hi-fidelity audio dealers, and through Rega’s website, where customers can customize their purchase. The purpose of this interview is to determine your attitudes towards the purchase and usage of hi-fidelity turntables and to better understand how your relationship with music influences your listening behavior. C.Questions about Rega Turntable Concept 7.What is your reaction towards Rega’s turntable line? 8.How would you compare the listening experience associated with Rega’s turntables to other popular means of listening to music? 9.Would you consider purchasing a Rega turntable? Why or why not? 10.In which price range would you place Rega’s turntables? D.Collection of Supplementary Demographic and Behavioral Data Appendix B: Concept Statement Rega, a hi-fidelity turntable company, is considering marketing their line of record players to a younger, urban audience. Rega’s turntables provide access to a higher quality musical experience, through use of vinyl records and their rich, analog sound. The line will be sold in mass market and independent music stores, hi-fidelity audio dealers, and through Rega’s website, where customers can customize their purchase. The purpose of this interview is to determine your attitudes towards the purchase and usage of hi-fidelity turntables and to better understand how your relationship with music influences your listening behavior. Appendix C: Excerpts from Focus Groups “You download something and immediately have ten viruses. It’s not even worth the hassle.” “I only listen to music from YouTube and Pandora Radio. I don’t buy it because I am afraid I will get tired of it.”“Robots are telling us what to listen to.” “I get a lot of my music just from sharing music with other people, and listening to other people’s playlists.”“I download all of my music illegally on LimeWire. I think I bought a CD a few months ago.”“If I buy a band’s CD, it is an investment for me. I feel good owning it.”“Sometimes I find music distracting if I am hanging out with a big group of people. I don’t want to have to talk over the music.” “I listen to music from my laptop. I only use my iPod if I am moving around.”“I listen to music equally by myself and with when other people are around. I just listen to different bands and signers for each.”“I think I have some artists that are like gods or semi gods that have older songs, and I listen to them because of who that person is and what they represent. Then I listen to other things because it might be connected to a good memory or a phase in my life.” “It drives the mood of whatever I’m writing at the time.” “I feel so strongly. I hate iPods. I think they isolate people and they turn music into a weapon. And anytime you put in your iPod you’re saying, ‘Don’t come near me.’” “Until I started hearing all that stuff about ear damage, I used my iPod. Now I have these really large phat speakers sitting in my room. Unless I have listened to something on those speakers, I don’t considered it having listened to the album.”“I get most of my information online. PerezHilton, TheSuperficial, and little side ads on Facebook. Also a lot of information from friends. I sometimes read The RollingStone or I’ll check out Billboard.com and download all the top songs.”“I think turntables are so cool! I think that are so classy. I want one. I want one to show off. I for sure want to own one in the future.” “It’s great to listen to a record on vinyl. It’s a totally different experience.” “I really like the noise the needle makes when it hits the record.”“Ew. It brings back bad memories. My mean violin teacher would always use it during lessons.” “Oh, if it comes in Pink then I am all for it!”“I could make an art installation out of that in my house.”“It would be nice to go back to a simpler time with a simpler technology. There is a lot of nostalgia.”“Can you customize it? Because in that way it is very different. I guess you have to be in the mood to listen to a certain artist.”“If I had a turntable, then I would have to listen to it with other people. It would be super awkward to do it by myself.”“So, if I have all this stuff on my computer, then I have to buy my music all over again just so that I can play it on something else? I don’t think so. I wouldn’t be able to make my own playlists or shuffle. I would only be able to listen to one artist. That is a big impact.”Appendix D: Post-Focus Group Questionnaire Please rank (1 = highest, 6 = lowest) the following musical equipment by how frequently you use each variety. If you do not use a given type, leave the line blank.EquipmentCountRankMP3 Player251.80Portable CD / Cassette Player144.29Mini-Stereo173.35Component Stereo163.69Computer 251.32Turntable95.78 2.Please rank (1 = highest, 6 = lowest) the following musical equipment by how enjoyable it is to use each. If you do not use a given type, leave the line blank. EquipmentCountRankMP3 Player252.04Portable CD / Cassette Player144.50Mini-Stereo173.63Component Stereo163.12Computer 251.88Turntable93.50 3.Please rank (1 = highest, 6 = lowest) the following musical equipment by how likely you are to purchase each variety. Please do not leave any lines blank. EquipmentCountRankMP3 Player241.63Portable CD / Cassette Player224.68Mini-Stereo233.74Component Stereo223.91Computer 252.20Turntable224.82 4.Please rank (1 = highest, 6 = lowest) the following music sources by how frequently you listen to music from each. If you do not listen to a source, leave the line blank. SourceCountRankAM / FM / Satellite Radio234.09Downloads (iTunes, LimeWire)231.30Television (MTV)204.70Hard Copy (CD, Cassette, Record)233.35Streaming Internet Radio193.42Website Postings (YouTube)232.74 5.Please list the brands you most associate with each variety of musical equipment. If you do not associate any brands with a given variety, leave the line blank. MP3 PlayerCountShareiPod1860.0%Zune310.0%Creative26.7%Sony26.7%iPhone13.3%iRiver13.3%Motorala13.3%Sandisk13.3%Sansa13.3% Portable CD / Cassette PlayerCountShareSony1473.7%Panasonic315.8%Best Buy15.3%JVC15.3% Mini-StereoCountShareSony1062.5%Bose212.5%JVC16.3%Panasonic16.3%Pansonic16.3%Phillips16.3% Component StereoCountShareSony642.9%Bose428.6%Bang & Olufsen17.1%JVC17.1%Mitsubishi17.1%Pansonic17.1% TurntableCountShareTechnics250.0%RCA125.0%Rega125.0% 6.Please list the brands you already own for each variety of musical equipment. If you do not own any brands for a given variety, leave the line blank. MP3 PlayerCountShareiPod1878.3%Creative14.3%LG14.3%RadioShack14.3%Sansa14.3%Sony14.3% Portable CD / Cassette PlayerCountShareSony981.82%Panasonic19.09%Virgin19.09% Mini-StereoCountSharePanasonic233.3%Sony233.3%iHome116.7%Unknown116.7% Component StereoCountShareSony360.0%Bose120.0%RCA120.0% TurntableCountShareTechnics1100.0% 8.Please list the brands you would consider purchasing for each variety of equipment. If you would not purchase any brands for a given variety, leave the line blank. MP3 PlayerCountShareiPod1477.8%Zune211.1%Creative15.6%Sony15.6% Portable CD / Cassette PlayerCountShareSony770.0%Panasonic220.0%Toshiba110.0% Mini-StereoCountShareBose342.9%Sony342.9%Panasonic114.3% Component StereoCountShareBose350.0%Sony233.3%RCA116.7% TurntableCountShareRega360.0%Technics240.0% 9.Please rate how much you agree with the following statement: “Owning a Rega Turntable would provide unique features and benefits that are appealing to me.” Average Rating• 2 16574 Highly DisagreeHighly Agree Average Rating•10.Please rate how much you agree with the following statement: “A Rega Turntable provides a different type of musical listening experience than other equipment.” 0 510613 Highly DisagreeHighly Agree 11.Please rate how much you agree with the following statement: “Investing in a Rega Turntable to complement my other music equipment would offer significant value.” Average Rating• 3 204106 Highly DisagreeHighly Agree 12.Please rate how much you agree with the following statement: “I would consider purchasing a Rega Turntable.” Average Rating• 4 14349 Highly DisagreeHighly Agree 13.Please provide the following demographic data: GenderCountPercentageFemale1768.0%Male832.0% AgeCountPercentage12 – 17312.0%18 – 241248.0%25 – 34832.0%35 – 5028.0%Average24.9 Appendix E: Rega’s Current Advertising Style 27940012065 3479800358140-6350035814034804354056380-628653027680Appendix F: Advertising Layout Mock-Ups Works Cited “Apple Store.” Apple. 2008. 5 Dec. 2008. . Dell, Kristina. “Vinyl Gets its Groove Back.” Time. 10 Jan. 2008. 24 Sept. 2008. . “History.” Rega Research Limited. 2004. 30 Nov 2008. . Hunt, Kevin. “The Tables Are Turned: Phonographs Are Cool Again.” Hartford Courant (25 Sept. 2003): 21. ProQuest Newspapers. ProQuest. NYU, Bobst Lib., NY. 30 Nov. 2007 . “Events.” Technics. 2005. Panasonic Corporation of North America. 30 Nov. 2008. . “Life Beyond the iPod!” TWICE: This Week in Consumer Electronics 23 (18 Aug. 2008): 2-6. Business Source Premiere. EBSCOhost. NYU, Bobst Lib., NY. 5 Dec. 2007 . Newman, Melinda. “Vinyl Records Make a Return.” Los Angeles Times 18 Aug. 2008. 25 Oct. 2008 . Pell, Alex and David Price. “Get into the groove with the revival of vinyl.” The Sunday Times (18 Nov. 2008): 16. LexisNexis Academic Universe. LexisNexis. NYU, Bobst Lib., NY. 30 Nov. 2007 < http://www.lexisnexis.com:80/us/lnacademic/results/docview/ docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T5261704835&format=GNBFI&sort=BOOLEAN&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T5261704839&cisb=22_T5261704838&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=332263&docNo=8>. Stereophile 2008 Buyer’s Guide. 26 Nov. 2008. 13, 122, 188. Winneker, Craig. “Vinyl Gets Another Spin.” Wall Street Journal (13 Sept. 2008): W2. ProQuest Newspapers. ProQuest. NYU, Bobst Lib., NY. 30 Nov. 2007 . “Wolfson Microelectronics” M2 Presswire (9 Apr. 2001): 1. ProQuest Newspapers. ProQuest. NYU, Bobst Lib., NY. 30 Nov. 2007 .

“I only listen to music from YouTube and Pandora Radio. I don’t buy it because I am afraid I will get tired of it.”

“I get a lot of my music just from sharing music with other people, and listening to other people’s playlists.”

“I download all of my music illegally on LimeWire. I think I bought a CD a few months ago.”

“If I buy a band’s CD, it is an investment for me. I feel good owning it.”

“Sometimes I find music distracting if I am hanging out with a big group of people. I don’t want to have to talk over the music.”

“I listen to music from my laptop. I only use my iPod if I am moving around.”

“I listen to music equally by myself and with when other people are around. I just listen to different bands and signers for each.”

“I feel so strongly. I hate iPods. I think they isolate people and they turn music into a weapon. And anytime you put in your iPod you’re saying, ‘Don’t come near me.’”

“Until I started hearing all that stuff about ear damage, I used my iPod. Now I have these really large phat speakers sitting in my room. Unless I have listened to something on those speakers, I don’t considered it having listened to the album.”

“I get most of my information online. PerezHilton, TheSuperficial, and little side ads on Facebook. Also a lot of information from friends. I sometimes read The RollingStone or I’ll check out Billboard.com and download all the top songs.”

“I think turntables are so cool! I think that are so classy. I want one. I want one to show off. I for sure want to own one in the future.”

“I really like the noise the needle makes when it hits the record.”

“Oh, if it comes in Pink then I am all for it!”

“I could make an art installation out of that in my house.”

“It would be nice to go back to a simpler time with a simpler technology. There is a lot of nostalgia.”

“Can you customize it? Because in that way it is very different. I guess you have to be in the mood to listen to a certain artist.”

“If I had a turntable, then I would have to listen to it with other people. It would be super awkward to do it by myself.”

“So, if I have all this stuff on my computer, then I have to buy my music all over again just so that I can play it on something else? I don’t think so. I wouldn’t be able to make my own playlists or shuffle. I would only be able to listen to one artist. That is a big impact.”

Please rank (1 = highest, 6 = lowest) the following musical equipment by how frequently you use each variety. If you do not use a given type, leave the line blank.

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