Rand Kannenberg Deviance And Criminal Behavior

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Information about Rand Kannenberg Deviance And Criminal Behavior
Health & Medicine

Published on November 27, 2008

Author: Kannenberg

Source: slideshare.net

Deviance and Criminal Behavior By Rand L. Kannenberg

Target Audience Addictions Professionals Domestic Violence Professionals Parole and Probation Officers Community Corrections Staff and Volunteers Prison and Jail Staff and Volunteers Mental Health Professionals

Addictions Professionals

Domestic Violence Professionals

Parole and Probation Officers

Community Corrections Staff and Volunteers

Prison and Jail Staff and Volunteers

Mental Health Professionals

Goals and Objectives Learn about and be able to discuss the following: Concepts and Theories of Crime and Deviance; Conduct Disorder and the Juvenile Justice System; Delinquent Gang Characteristics; Predicting and Preventing Recidivism; Incarceration and Supervision as Punishment, Reform and Protection; Offender Counseling and Substance Abuse Cognitive Behavioral Treatment in Corrections

Concepts and Theories of Crime and Deviance;

Conduct Disorder and the Juvenile Justice System;

Delinquent Gang Characteristics;

Predicting and Preventing Recidivism;

Incarceration and Supervision as Punishment, Reform and Protection;

Offender Counseling and Substance Abuse Cognitive Behavioral Treatment in Corrections

DEVIANCE “ any behavior which violates the routine expectations of others… the person engaging in that behavior may be treated as being ‘different’ from others in some important way.” Frank Scarpitti, SOCIAL PROBLEMS

“ any behavior which violates the routine expectations of others…

the person engaging in that behavior may be treated as being ‘different’ from others in some important way.”

Frank Scarpitti, SOCIAL PROBLEMS

CRIME Crime is a form of deviant behavior.

Crime is a form of deviant

behavior.

Questions about crime: Is crime a social disease (or problem)? Are there any positive functions of crime and criminals? What is the relationship between crime and change?

Is crime a social disease (or problem)?

Are there any positive functions of crime and criminals?

What is the relationship between crime and change?

Theory One Behavior is learned . All behavior is learned . Deviant behavior is learned . Criminal behavior is learned .

Behavior is learned .

All behavior is learned .

Deviant behavior is learned .

Criminal behavior is learned .

Other explanations for behavior. human nature is bad rage leads to crime stress causes deviance social pressure is to blame for problems once labeled bad always bad crime is a profession crime as a family business crime is tolerated so all can do it criminals have moral defects criminals are pathological problems start early

human nature is bad

rage leads to crime

stress causes deviance

social pressure is to blame for problems

once labeled bad always bad

crime is a profession

crime as a family business

crime is tolerated so all can do it

criminals have moral defects

criminals are pathological

problems start early

Conduct Disorder “Checklist” (American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , Fourth Edition. Washington, D.C., American Psychiatric Association, 1994.) _____aggression to people and animals _____destruction of property _____deceitfulness or theft _____serious violations of rules _____onset prior to age 10 years _____onset after age 10 years _____few problems/minor harm to others _____number/effect between mild and severe _____many problems/considerable harm to others

_____aggression to people and animals

_____destruction of property

_____deceitfulness or theft

_____serious violations of rules

Antisocial Personality Disorder (American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , Fourth Edition. Washington, D.C., American Psychiatric Association, 1994.) “ A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following: (1) failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest (2) deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure (3) impulsivity or failure to plan ahead (4) irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults (5) reckless disregard for safety of self or others (6) consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations (7) lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another B. The individual is at least age 18 years. C. There is evidence of Conduct Disorder with onset before age 15 years. D. The occurrence of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of Schizophrenia or a Manic Episode.”

“ A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following:

(1) failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest

(2) deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure

(3) impulsivity or failure to plan ahead

(4) irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults

(5) reckless disregard for safety of self or others

(6) consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations

(7) lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another

B. The individual is at least age 18 years.

C. There is evidence of Conduct Disorder with onset before age 15 years.

D. The occurrence of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of Schizophrenia or a Manic Episode.”

Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Teaching options and alternatives. communication decision making problem solving Practicing the newly learned skills. Graduating only once able to demonstrate change. Success is equal to change.

Teaching options and alternatives.

communication

decision making

problem solving

Practicing the newly learned skills.

Graduating only once able to demonstrate change.

Success is equal to change.

RECIDIVISM “R” WORDS REOFFENDED REARRESTED RECONVICTED RESENTENCED REINCARCERATED REGRESSED RELAPSED READMITTED REHOSPITALIZED

REOFFENDED

REARRESTED

RECONVICTED

RESENTENCED

REINCARCERATED

REGRESSED

RELAPSED

READMITTED

REHOSPITALIZED

Robert Mathias “ Correctional Treatment Helps Offenders Stay Drug and Arrest Free ” NIDA Notes (National Institute on Drug Abuse) July/August, 1995 18 Months After Release From Prison % DrugFree 1 = no treatment 2 = in prison TC only 3 = work release TC only 4 = both in prison and work release TCs

Robert Mathias “ Correctional Treatment Helps Offenders Stay Drug and Arrest Free ” NIDA Notes (National Institute on Drug Abuse) July/August, 1995 18 Months After Release From Prison % Arrest Free 1 = no treatment 2 = in prison TC only 3 = work release TC only 4 = both in prison and work release TCs

Incarceration to punish? to reform? to protect? Do sociopaths and addicts/substance abusers get treatment in jail and prison?

to punish?

to reform?

to protect?

Do sociopaths and addicts/substance abusers get treatment in jail and prison?

U.S. Jails United States Justice Department, Bureau of Justice Statistics, looked at 431 jails interviewed 6,000 inmates randomly selected about 90% were male/10% were female 37% were Anglo (71% of population) 41% were Black (13% of population) 19% were Hispanic (11% of population) 3% other groups (5% of population) 36% of the inmates said they were unemployed before their most recent arrest 50% of the inmates grew up in single parent homes 12% had lived in households without either parent 33% said their parents or guardians abused alcohol and drugs 48% of the female inmates and 13% of the male inmates have been sexually and/or physically abused at least once in their lives 27% of the women and 3% of the men have been raped in the past 50% said a relative had spent time in jail or prison 39% spent some part of their childhood in households that had received welfare or public housing assistance

looked at 431 jails

interviewed 6,000 inmates randomly selected

about 90% were male/10% were female

37% were Anglo (71% of population)

41% were Black (13% of population)

19% were Hispanic (11% of population)

3% other groups (5% of population)

36% of the inmates said they were unemployed before their most recent arrest

50% of the inmates grew up in single parent homes

12% had lived in households without either parent

33% said their parents or guardians abused alcohol and drugs

48% of the female inmates and 13% of the male inmates have been sexually and/or physically abused at least once in their lives

27% of the women and 3% of the men have been raped in the past

50% said a relative had spent time in jail or prison

39% spent some part of their childhood in households that had received welfare or public housing assistance

Career Mental Patients (Inmates) Erving Goffman Phase 1 Pre-patient A patient willing to be admitted for relief. Phase 2 Inpatient Once settled down feeling deserted/stripped. Phase 3 Ex-patient For the lucky ones who get out but are forever changed.

Phase 1

Pre-patient

A patient willing to be admitted for relief.

Phase 2

Inpatient

Once settled down feeling deserted/stripped.

Phase 3

Ex-patient

For the lucky ones who get out but are forever changed.

Total Institutions Erving Goffman all aspects of life in same place, same authority daily activities carried out in immediate company of others all phases of daily activities are tightly scheduled all enforced activities are part of the overall plan to fulfill the official aims people come to the institutions already as members the stripping process (removal of personal identity and possessions) is standard there are house rules which clearly spell out the main requirements of conduct there are some rewards or privileges in exchange for obedience or compliance punishment and release are always options (except release cannot be assumed for inmates)

all aspects of life in same place, same authority

daily activities carried out in immediate company of others

all phases of daily activities are tightly scheduled

all enforced activities are part of the overall plan to fulfill the official aims

people come to the institutions already as members

the stripping process (removal of personal identity and possessions) is standard

there are house rules which clearly spell out the main requirements of conduct

there are some rewards or privileges in exchange for obedience or compliance

punishment and release are always options (except release cannot be assumed for inmates)

Juvenile Justice System there are 3,000 juvenile courts in the country 55% of juveniles who are arrested are prosecuted (up from 45%)(17,500 juveniles a year are prosecuted in Colorado) only 33% of juveniles who are prosecuted are convicted (only up from 31%)(By contrast, more than 90% of adult defendants plead guilty in plea agreements.) only 9% of all juveniles who are arrested are incarcerated (141,300) National Center for Juvenile Justice “ Dr. Charles Frazier, Professor of Sociology at the University of Florida studied 5,476 juvenile criminals in Florida (for seven years). He concluded that those juveniles tried as adults committed new crimes sooner after their release from prison than the other juveniles. He noted that their crimes were also more serious and violent than their peers who were tried as juveniles. He recommends keeping juveniles in the juvenile justice system because most juvenile institutions provide education and treatment that is age appropriate for the younger inmates needing rehabilitation.”

there are 3,000 juvenile courts in the country

55% of juveniles who are arrested are prosecuted (up from 45%)(17,500 juveniles a year are prosecuted in Colorado)

only 33% of juveniles who are prosecuted are convicted (only up from 31%)(By contrast, more than 90% of adult defendants plead guilty in plea agreements.)

only 9% of all juveniles who are arrested are incarcerated

(141,300)

National Center for Juvenile Justice

Delinquent Gangs “ Near-Groups” are neither social groups nor mobs but somewhere in between the two extremes on the continuum of social order. Gangs Lewis Yablonsky

“ Near-Groups”

are neither social groups nor mobs but somewhere in between the two extremes on the continuum of social order.

GANGS ARE CHARACTERIZED BY THE FOLLOWING FACTORS Yablonsky 1. DIFFUSE ROLE DEFINITIONS 2. LIMITED COHESION 3. IMPERMANENCE 4. MINIMAL CONSENSUS OF NORMS 5. SHIFTING MEMBERSHIP 6. DISTURBED LEADERSHIP 7. LIMITED DEFINITION OF EXPECTATIONS

1. DIFFUSE ROLE

DEFINITIONS

2. LIMITED

COHESION

3. IMPERMANENCE

4. MINIMAL

CONSENSUS OF

NORMS

5. SHIFTING

MEMBERSHIP

6. DISTURBED

LEADERSHIP

7. LIMITED

DEFINITION OF

EXPECTATIONS

Gangs Small Group Exercise 1. Determine who the leader will be and let that individual lead. 2. Decide who the two current members are and let them belong. 3. Decide who the two newly recruited members are and what they have to do to belong, and have them do it. 4. Pick a name for your group and call yourselves that. 5. Select one or more colors for your group and display them. 6. Draw a design to represent your group on the color of the paper selected and show it. 7. Create three (3) hand signs (one to identify your group, one to communicate something specific to a fellow group member and one meant to intimidate members of the other groups) and use them. 8. Imagine the clothing you will all wear and how you will wear it (from hair to shoes) and describe it. 9. Draw or write coded messages, statements or warnings on the other pieces of paper and show them. 10. React as a group when one member announces that he or she wants to leave the group and decide what is going to happen next. Copyright 1998 Criminal Justice Addiction Services

1. Determine who the leader will be and let that individual lead.

2. Decide who the two current members are and let them belong.

3. Decide who the two newly recruited members are and what they have to do to belong, and have them do it.

4. Pick a name for your group and call yourselves that.

5. Select one or more colors for your group and display them.

6. Draw a design to represent your group on the color of the paper selected and show it.

7. Create three (3) hand signs (one to identify your group, one to communicate something specific to a fellow group member and one meant to intimidate members of the other groups) and use them.

8. Imagine the clothing you will all wear and how you will wear it (from hair to shoes) and describe it.

9. Draw or write coded messages, statements or warnings on the other pieces of paper and show them.

10. React as a group when one member announces that he or she wants to leave the group and decide what is going to happen next.

Offender Jargon 1. I just got out of camp . 2. I lived for canteen . 3. I hated the fish tank most. 4. I never had to go to the hole . 5. Have you seen my jacket ? 6. I had two kids on the inside. 7. I would rather kill my number . 8. I saw my share of shanks there. 9. I never had a write up . 10. The man was a real #$%*&!

1. I just got out of camp .

2. I lived for canteen .

3. I hated the fish tank most.

4. I never had to go to the hole .

5. Have you seen my jacket ?

6. I had two kids on the inside.

7. I would rather kill my number .

8. I saw my share of shanks there.

9. I never had a write up .

10. The man was a real #$%*&!

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