Radiology Rounds 29 Year Old S

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Information about Radiology Rounds 29 Year Old S

Published on June 24, 2008

Author: radrounds

Source: slideshare.net

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29 year old s/p fall Laura Avery, MD Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School Boston, MA, USA

8.4 HU

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Differential for Fluid in Abdomen in Trauma Simple fluid Acites Bile Urine Intermediate density Bowel contents (small bowel injury) Old blood High density Blood Opacified bowel contents or urine

Simple fluid

Acites

Bile

Urine

Intermediate density

Bowel contents (small bowel injury)

Old blood

High density

Blood

Opacified bowel contents or urine

What do you want to do next? Bladder injury with intraluminal hemmatoma. Cytogram was done to better define injury and to make pretty images.

Bladder injury with intraluminal hemmatoma.

Cytogram was done to better define injury and to make pretty images.

Intraperitoneal contrast from cystogram

Pretty epiploic fat

 

 

 

Bladder injury

 

 

Companion Case

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extraperitoneal bladder Rupture Retzius ' space To scrotum

Extraperitoneal bladder rupture Traumatic extraperitoneal ruptures usually are associated with pelvic fractures (89-100%). Previously, the mechanism of injury was believed to be from a direct perforation by a bony fragment or a disruption of the pelvic girdle. It is now generally agreed that the pelvic fracture is likely coincidental and that the bladder rupture is most often due to a direct burst injury or the shearing force of the deforming pelvic ring. These ruptures usually are associated with fractures of the anterior pubic arch, and they may occur from a direct laceration of the bladder by the bony fragments of the osseous pelvis. The anterolateral aspect of the bladder typically is perforated by bony spicules. Forceful disruption of the bony pelvis and/or the puboprostatic ligaments also tear the wall of the bladder. The degree of bladder injury is directly related to the severity of the fracture. Some cases may occur by a mechanism similar to intraperitoneal bladder rupture, which is a combination of trauma and bladder overdistention. The classic cystographic finding is contrast extravasation around the base of the bladder confined to the perivesical space; flame-shaped areas of contrast extravasation are noted adjacent to the bladder. The bladder may assume a teardrop shape from compression by a pelvic hematoma. Starburst, flame-shape, and featherlike patterns also are described. With a more complex injury, the contrast material extends to the thigh, penis, perineum, or into the anterior abdominal wall. Extravasation will reach the scrotum when the superior fascia of the urogenital diaphragm or the urogenital diaphragm itself becomes disrupted. If the inferior fascia of the urogenital diaphragm is violated, the contrast material will reach the thigh and penis (within the confines of the Colles fascia). Rarely, contrast may extravasate into the thigh through the obturator foramen or into the anterior abdominal wall. Sometimes, the contrast may extravasate through the inguinal canal and into the scrotum or labia majora.

Traumatic extraperitoneal ruptures usually are associated with pelvic fractures (89-100%). Previously, the mechanism of injury was believed to be from a direct perforation by a bony fragment or a disruption of the pelvic girdle. It is now generally agreed that the pelvic fracture is likely coincidental and that the bladder rupture is most often due to a direct burst injury or the shearing force of the deforming pelvic ring.

These ruptures usually are associated with fractures of the anterior pubic arch, and they may occur from a direct laceration of the bladder by the bony fragments of the osseous pelvis. The anterolateral aspect of the bladder typically is perforated by bony spicules. Forceful disruption of the bony pelvis and/or the puboprostatic ligaments also tear the wall of the bladder. The degree of bladder injury is directly related to the severity of the fracture.

Some cases may occur by a mechanism similar to intraperitoneal bladder rupture, which is a combination of trauma and bladder overdistention. The classic cystographic finding is contrast extravasation around the base of the bladder confined to the perivesical space; flame-shaped areas of contrast extravasation are noted adjacent to the bladder. The bladder may assume a teardrop shape from compression by a pelvic hematoma. Starburst, flame-shape, and featherlike patterns also are described.

With a more complex injury, the contrast material extends to the thigh, penis, perineum, or into the anterior abdominal wall. Extravasation will reach the scrotum when the superior fascia of the urogenital diaphragm or the urogenital diaphragm itself becomes disrupted.

If the inferior fascia of the urogenital diaphragm is violated, the contrast material will reach the thigh and penis (within the confines of the Colles fascia). Rarely, contrast may extravasate into the thigh through the obturator foramen or into the anterior abdominal wall. Sometimes, the contrast may extravasate through the inguinal canal and into the scrotum or labia majora.

Intraperitoneal Bladder Rupture Classic intraperitoneal bladder ruptures are described as large horizontal tears in the dome of the bladder. The dome is the least supported area and the only portion of the adult bladder covered by peritoneum. The mechanism of injury is a sudden large increase in intravesical pressure in a full bladder. When full, the bladder's muscle fibers are widely separated and the entire bladder wall is relatively thin, offering relatively little resistance to perforation from sudden large changes in intravesical pressure. Intraperitoneal bladder rupture occurs as the result of a direct blow to a distended urinary bladder. Resulting increase in intravesical pressure causes a horizontal tear along the intraperitoneal portion of the bladder wall. This is the weakest part of the bladder, since its muscle fibers are most widely separated. This type of injury is common among patients diagnosed with alcoholism or those sustaining a seatbelt or steering wheel injury. Since urine may continue to drain into the abdomen, intraperitoneal ruptures may go undiagnosed from days to weeks. Electrolyte abnormalities (eg, hyperkalemia, hypernatremia, uremia, acidosis) may occur as urine is reabsorbed from the peritoneal cavity. Such patients may appear anuric, and the diagnosis is established when urinary ascites are recovered during paracentesis. Intraperitoneal ruptures demonstrate contrast extravasation into the peritoneal cavity, often outlining loops of bowel, filling paracolic gutters, and pooling under the diaphragm. An intraperitoneal rupture is more common in children because of the relative intra-abdominal position of the bladder. The bladder descends into the pelvis usually by the age of 20 years.

Classic intraperitoneal bladder ruptures are described as large horizontal tears in the dome of the bladder. The dome is the least supported area and the only portion of the adult bladder covered by peritoneum. The mechanism of injury is a sudden large increase in intravesical pressure in a full bladder. When full, the bladder's muscle fibers are widely separated and the entire bladder wall is relatively thin, offering relatively little resistance to perforation from sudden large changes in intravesical pressure.

Intraperitoneal bladder rupture occurs as the result of a direct blow to a distended urinary bladder. Resulting increase in intravesical pressure causes a horizontal tear along the intraperitoneal portion of the bladder wall. This is the weakest part of the bladder, since its muscle fibers are most widely separated. This type of injury is common among patients diagnosed with alcoholism or those sustaining a seatbelt or steering wheel injury.

Since urine may continue to drain into the abdomen, intraperitoneal ruptures may go undiagnosed from days to weeks. Electrolyte abnormalities (eg, hyperkalemia, hypernatremia, uremia, acidosis) may occur as urine is reabsorbed from the peritoneal cavity. Such patients may appear anuric, and the diagnosis is established when urinary ascites are recovered during paracentesis.

Intraperitoneal ruptures demonstrate contrast extravasation into the peritoneal cavity, often outlining loops of bowel, filling paracolic gutters, and pooling under the diaphragm. An intraperitoneal rupture is more common in children because of the relative intra-abdominal position of the bladder. The bladder descends into the pelvis usually by the age of 20 years.

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