Promoting Healthy Equal Relationships -

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Information about Promoting Healthy Equal Relationships -
Science-Technology

Published on December 11, 2008

Author: aSGuest6268

Source: authorstream.com

Slide 1: In developing criteria for reviewing the resources on this site we drew from two bodies of theory; Cultural Relational Theory and Intersectional Analysis. This PowerPoint presentation outlines the principles of each and explains how they relate to our work of promoting healthy equal relationships. Promoting Healthy Equal Relationships : Promoting Healthy Equal Relationships A Relational Approach Our Theoretical Framework:Relational-Cultural Theory : Our Theoretical Framework:Relational-Cultural Theory Relational-Cultural Theory, (RCT) emerges from the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Stone Centre, one of the partners in the Wellesley Centres for Women at Wellesley College in Boston. The theory has been developed by a group of feminist psychologists who began meeting in 1978, shortly after the publication of Jean Baker Miller’s groundbreaking book, Toward a New Psychology of Women. A Gendered Understanding of Human Psychology : A Gendered Understanding of Human Psychology Relational-Cultural Theory incorporates an understanding of gender in the study of human psychology. Nurturing and care giving are gendered responsibilities in our society. Nurturing and care giving are relationship building skills. Relationships, Respect and Cooperation : Relationships, Respect and Cooperation Traditional psychology sees growth as a process of separation and individuation. This leads to an ethic of competition and a division of the world into ‘us and them’. Relationships, Respect and Cooperation : Relationships, Respect and Cooperation Relational-Cultural Theory sees growth occurring as we work through and towards connection (not toward separation). Understanding relationships as growth fostering leads us to an ethic of respect and cooperation. From Gender Differences to Gender Discrimination : From Gender Differences to Gender Discrimination We socialize males and females differently We expect females to be submissive, emotional, sensitive and to care for others We expect males to be dominant, aggressive and achievement oriented From Gender Differences to Gender Discrimination : From Gender Differences to Gender Discrimination We have devalued the relationship building and sustaining roles females are expected to assume. We have devalued girls and women themselves, often viewing and treating them as ‘less than’ males. The Critical Role of Relationships In Our Lives : The Critical Role of Relationships In Our Lives Although the work of building and sustaining relationships has been devalued, it is critical to the functioning of all aspects of life: in the home in the community at school in the workplace Being Authentic in Relationships : Being Authentic in Relationships In a healthy, equal relationship we stay connected to our own experience. We do not shape ourselves to fit a particular situation or to fit someone else’s needs. We must bring our personal experience into our relationships with others and at the same time we must be aware of our impact on others. Responding and Growing in Relationships : Responding and Growing in Relationships Mutual empathy allows us to respectfully respond to others’ experience and to acknowledge others’ impact on us. Mutual empathy is at the core of healthy equal relationships and growth. Mutual empathy is a quality that males and females need in order to build and sustain healthy equal relationships. All Relationships Face Challenges : All Relationships Face Challenges Disconnections are endemic to human relationships; they happen all the time. Repairing disconnections can be a place of great growth, if empathy and responsiveness are at work. This theme emerges through conflict resolution strategies in anti-violence resources. The impact of gendered experience must be acknowledged in conflict resolution strategies. The Characteristics of Healthy Equal Relationships : The Characteristics of Healthy Equal Relationships Growth-fostering relationships are characterized by The Five Good Things: zest clarity productivity enhanced feelings of worth a desire for more connection The Characteristics of Healthy Equal Relationships : The Characteristics of Healthy Equal Relationships We want to assess the degree to which anti-violence resources promote the five qualities characteristic of growth fostering relationships. We believe these are the characteristics of healthy, equal relationships. The Complexity of Girls’ and Boys Lives : The Complexity of Girls’ and Boys Lives Initially at CREVAWC we were concerned primarily with how gender shapes experiences. Through listening to girls in our research we quickly learned that there is not an ‘essential’ girl. Neither is there an ‘essential’ boy that represents the experiences of all boys. The Complexity of Girls’ and Boys Lives : The Complexity of Girls’ and Boys Lives Girls and boys have many different social identities and these identities shape experiences in a multitude of ways. We needed an analytical framework that could capture this complexity. Relational Cultural Theory Incorporates Principles of Intersectionality : Relational Cultural Theory Incorporates Principles of Intersectionality An intersectional analysis recognizes that all relationships are shaped and informed by a socio-political context that either promotes well-being or undermines it. When differences are stratified (or ranked), people are injured by these stratifications or rankings. The Interplay Between Societal and Interpersonal Relationships : The Interplay Between Societal and Interpersonal Relationships Experiences of being ‘the other’ lead to chronic disconnections at a societal level. These disconnections are destructive to the individual and the community. Applying an Intersectional Analysis : Applying an Intersectional Analysis An intersectional analysis requires an understanding of the concepts: Intersections Violence Power What is an Intersection? : What is an Intersection? Intersections can be conceptual spaces or physical spaces. They are the socio-political, ideological, cultural, and intellectual spaces where marginalized people create communities. What is an Intersection? : What is an Intersection? Members of the dominant group(s) occupy the center of our society. They are the invisible norm. Intersections are the symbolic and sometimes actual physical spaces that marginalized people occupy in relation to the norm. Intersections are characterized by structures of domination. How Are Intersections Created? : How Are Intersections Created? The dominant culture has the power to define one group as better than the other. One way we frequently do this is through presenting images that form our impressions of whole groups of people. Patricia Hill Collins has called these, “Controlling Images.” They are also stereotypes. How Are Intersections Created? : How Are Intersections Created? The world as we know it divides people based on the notion that some are “better than” and some are “less than.” Some of us are deserving of privileges and opportunities, others less so. We are a world divided into camps of “us” and “them.” How Are Intersections Created? : How Are Intersections Created? Who becomes “other” is determined by values that define social norms and organize us into social hierarchies. Aspects of social identity such as gender, race, sexual orientation, ability, religious affiliation, citizenship status or class, become tools for identifying difference and for determining worth. How Are Intersections Created? : How Are Intersections Created? Western patriarchal values place the white, able-bodied, not yet elderly, affluent male at the centre of society, granting him greater access to power and privilege. At the same time as this invisible social hierarchy creates norms and greatly influences the flow of power, it remains invisible to most. Understanding Violence : Understanding Violence In the Violence against Women movement we have often defined violence as having power and control over someone. We have not however, consistently described the dynamics that lead to one person having control over another. Control is gained through a process of using differences to make some people into the “other” and then devaluing that other. Understanding Power : Understanding Power To understand how violence operates, we also have to understand power. Power is simply, “the ability to act.” We have a choice about how we use the power we have. Understanding Power : Understanding Power We can use it to dominate and control others. This is often referred to as “power over.” It is a use of power that perpetrates violence. We can also use the power we have to seek harmony and balance in our relationships. This is often referred to as “power with.” It is a use of power that fosters growth and development in ourselves and in others. Understanding Violence : Understanding Violence This hierarchal ordering of humankind, this normalization and acceptance of dominance is structural violence. Structural violence is manifested in many ways including the extremes of wealth and poverty that characterize our society, the disproportionate number of Aboriginal people in our prison systems, the wage gap between men and women and other social inequities. What Is an Intersectional Analysis? : What Is an Intersectional Analysis? An intersectional analysis looks at how difference and otherness is constructed in every domain. It recognizes and takes into account the multiple and interconnecting impacts of policies and practices on different groups because of their gender, race, class, ability, sexuality, religion, culture, refugee or immigrant status, or other status. What Is an Intersectional Analysis? : What Is an Intersectional Analysis? An intersectional analysis moves away from only examining identity to look at the structural impact of an individual’s experience. An intersectional analysis does not focus on individual personality traits or attributes. An intersectional analysis does focus on the opportunities or lack of opportunities for an individual. What Is an Intersectional Analysis? : What Is an Intersectional Analysis? Each individual belongs to many groups and communities. This framework recognizes that our life experiences occur in multiple and compounding spheres. The intersection is different from the concept of layered oppressions because it offers the potential for those is marginalized groups to simultaneously experience privilege and oppression, depending on the context. What Is an Intersectional Analysis? : What Is an Intersectional Analysis? Although we may lack privilege and be disadvantaged in some circumstances and contexts, we are not always victims In different circumstances or contexts, we can find ourselves in a position of relative power and we have the potential to oppress others with this power In one space, an aspect of our identity may be an advantage and in another space it may become a disadvantage What Is an Intersectional Analysis? : What Is an Intersectional Analysis? An intersectional analysis acknowledges the central role of relationships in creating and structuring our world. The need to pay close attention to relational dynamics led us to merge ideas from Relational-Cultural Theory in our intersectional analysis. One woman’s Structurally Defined Disadvantages : Contract worker Single mother One woman’s Structurally Defined Disadvantages Structural Disadvantages or Intersections Working class background Gender The Same Woman’s Structural Advantages or Access to Power : Not living on a fixed income Access to formal education Born in Canada English speaker Temporarily abled (No DisAbility) Christian Heritage No conflict with the law Employment at a University Access to information The Same Woman’s Structural Advantages or Access to Power White Building Blocks of Power Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency : Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency Although the margins can be oppressive spaces, they also have the potential to liberate. Intersections, or the margins may be chosen spaces that can provide strength and valuable insight for understanding and critiquing dominant societal values and oppressive social norms. Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency : Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency Oppressive beliefs and behaviours can be intentional or unintentional. Developing a critical awareness of our values and naming what is valued and privileged by the society we live in is the first step to dismantling attitudes and behaviors that oppress others. Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency : Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency It’s important to remember that social norms are not static. Dominant social norms can and do change, even if progress is slow. Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency : Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency We do not want to use an intersectional analysis to assign a permanent victim status to some groups and individuals. We want to demonstrate how power flows, but keep open and encourage the possibility of change. Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency : Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency Girls and boys, young women and young men need safe spaces to grow and learn about themselves and each other. We can work to create spaces where differences are not viewed as deficits, but rather respected and explored with mutual interest. Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency : Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency In these spaces, girls and boys can begin to understand and appreciate their unique identities, their unique challenges and their unique strengths. They can learn to question the social norms that shape their existence and they can learn how to negotiate and navigate the power imbalances they face. Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency : Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency Girls and boys can learn that mutual cooperation and an openness to the other is a more enriching and rewarding experience than being isolated and separated through a drive to be better than others. These are spaces where girls and boys can grow emotionally and intellectually through exchanges with others who are different from them. Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency : Using an Intersectional Analysis to Foster Resistance and Resiliency In these safe spaces boys and girls can learn and practice empathy. This will help them to build and sustain healthy equal relationships.

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