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Published on January 14, 2009

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Slide 1: Welcome to…..Planet Health By Jill Carter, M.A., Ed.M., Jean Wiecha, Ph.D, Karen Peterson, D.Sc. and Steve Gortmaker, Ph.D Harvard Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity Harvard School of Public Health A project of the: Planet Health Introductory Workshop : Planet Health Introductory Workshop Agenda Topics Introductions Pyramid Power (ice breaker) What is Planet Health? (Presentation and Activity) Are you concerned about your students’ nutrition and physical activity habits? (Discussion) The Health of Young People: Trends in Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Inactivity. (Presentation) Turning the Tables: Why Schools Need to be Part of the Solution (Presentation) Planet Health’s Educational Approach (Presentation) Planet Health’s Nutrition and Physical Activity Messages (Activities) Using the Planet Health Curriculum (Planning Activity) Talking to Youth about Nutrition and Physical Activity Habits (Role Play/ Discussions) Planet Health Demonstration Lessons : Planet Health Demonstration Lessons Lesson 31 (Introductory Classroom Lesson, p. 103) Do You Make Space for Fitness and Nutrition? Lesson 33 (Language Arts, p. 143) Carbohydrates: Energy Foods Lesson 34 (Language Arts, p. 159) The Language of Food Lesson 49 (Science, p. 327) Fat Functions Lesson 62 (Social Studies, p. 464) Impact of Technology Appendix D (p. 495) Charting TV Viewing Time: Power Down Introduction to FitCheck (Physical Education, p. 21) Reprinted by permission, from J. Carter et al, 2001, Planet Health, (Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics), pages xix, 22, 23, 105, 117, 119, 129, 153, 163, 165, 335, 406, 464, 465, 472, 473, 475, 502, 503. Pyramid Power : Pyramid Power Slide 5: What is Planet Health? An interdisciplinary health curriculum for middle school students that teaches students about nutrition and physical activity. Builds skills and competencies in language arts, math, science, social studies and physical education. Slide 6: Nutrition Planet Health Goals: Eat Well... Eat five or more fruits and veggies per day Eat fat in moderation Fitness AND Keep Moving… Be physically active daily or nearly every day Limit screen time to no more than two hours per day Make Space for... Slide 7: Planet Health Overview 30 Micro-Units 2 FitChecks 8 Social Studies Lessons 8 Language Arts Lessons 8 Math Lessons 8 Science Lessons Classroom Lessons Physical Education Lessons Planet Health Goals: Eat five or more fruits and vegetables each day. Eat fat in moderation. Be active every day or nearly every day. Limit your screen time to no more than 2 hours each day. Student Self-Assessment Lesson Power Down Slide 8: Do You Make Space for Fitness and Nutrition? Lesson 31 Introduction: Student Self-Assessment Student Self-Assessment Class Graph Compare Planet Health messages to class graphs: What conclusions can students formulate? What goals can the class set? Brainstorm/Discuss: What are the benefits of a healthy diet and regular physical activity? Activity 1 Activity 2 Key Question Open-ended Question Activity 3 or 4 Repeat lesson at the end of the year! Slide 11: Nutrition Planet Health Goals: Eat Well... Eat five or more fruits and veggies per day Eat fat in moderation Fitness AND Keep Moving… Be physically active daily or nearly every day Limit screen time to no more than two hours per day Make Space for... Are you concerned about your students’ nutrition and physical activity habits? : Are you concerned about your students’ nutrition and physical activity habits? The Health of Young People: : The Health of Young People: Trends in Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Inactivity Slide 17:  The Health of Young People Fact Fiction Youth are at Risk! : Trends in Nutrition: Only 1 in 4 children eat two servings of fruits a day. Only 1 in 2 eats three servings of vegetables. 70% eat more saturated fat than experts recommend. Teenagers today drink twice as much soda as milk. SOURCES: USDHHS. Healthy People 2010 Cavadini C. et al. Arch Dis Child 2000;83:18-24 (based on USDA surveys) Youth are at Risk! Youth are at Risk! : Youth are at Risk! Trends in Activity and Inactivity: Approximately one third of American youth are not vigorously active on a regular basis. Participation in all types of physical activity declines strikingly as age or grade in school increases, especially in girls. TV use averages 2.2 to 3.5 hrs/day among older children and teens, but 30% watch 5 or more hrs/day SOURCES: CDC, National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 1999 Wiecha et al. Ambul Pediatr. 2001; 1:244-251. Percentage of U.S. Children and Adolescents Who Were Overweight * : Percentage of U.S. Children and Adolescents Who Were Overweight * * >95th percentile for BMI by age and sex based on 2000 CDC BMI-for-age growth charts **Data are from 1963-65 for children 6-11 years of age and from 1966-70 for adolescents 12-17 years of age Source: National Center for Health Statistics Youth are at Risk! Trends in obesity... Adults are at Risk! : Diet and physical activity patterns together account for at least 300,000 deaths among adults in the U.S. each year; only tobacco use contributes to more deaths. 61% of U.S. adults are overweight or obese 26% are obese Adults are at Risk! SOURCE: USDHH. The Surgeon General's call to action to prevent and decrease overweight and obesity. http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity Environmental and Social Change Affect Health Behavior : Environmental and Social Change Affect Health Behavior Decreased Energy Expenditure Increased Energy Intake More foods available everywhere More meals out with bigger meals More sugar-sweetened beverages Successful food advertising More TV More car travel Fewer PE classes Fewer safe walking/bike routes Lower perception of safety What do TV viewing and soda consumption have to do with it? : What do TV viewing and soda consumption have to do with it? Slide 24: SOURCE: Dietz WH, Gortmaker SL. Pediatrics, 1985; 75:807-812. Gortmaker SL, Must A, Sobol AM, Peterson K, Colditz GA, Dietz WH. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 1996;150:356-362. Slide 25: Clhereype page title Dietz WH, Gortmaker SL. Pediatrics, 1985; 75:807-812. Gortmaker SL, Must A, Sobol AM, Peterson K, Colditz GA, Dietz WH. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 1996;150:356-362. Beverage Intake Among Adolescents Aged 11-18, 1965-1996 : Beverage Intake Among Adolescents Aged 11-18, 1965-1996 SOURCE: Cavadini C. et al. Arch Dis Child 2000;83:18-24 (based on USDA surveys) Slide 27:  ? Turning the Tables: Why schools need to be part of the solution! : Turning the Tables: Why schools need to be part of the solution! Promoting Healthy Eating and Active Living : Promoting Healthy Eating and Active Living Environment Individual behaviors and choices Policies Family School Community Slide 30: School Ein Eout FOOD CHOICE Vending machines Cafeteria Packed meals School Sales CONSUMPTION Child Taste/preferences SCHOOL PROGRAMS PE Availability • After School PE Frequency • Recess PE Structure • Sports BEHAVIORS After school program Walk to School Adapted from Dietz, W. and Gortmaker, S. Annu. Rev. Public Health. 2001; 22:337-53. Why a School-Based Program? : Why a School-Based Program? 90% of US Children attend school daily. School-based programs can prevent obesity. Healthy eating and adequate physical activity are a critical part of learning and achievement. Healthy Eating and Physical Activity are a Critical Part of Leaning and Achievement : Healthy Eating and Physical Activity are a Critical Part of Leaning and Achievement Brain development and function require an adequate supply of nutrients. Eating Breakfast increases academic test scores, daily attendance, concentration, and class participation. Children learn through movement. Physical activity increases alertness. Schools that offer intensive physical activity programs see no negative effects on standardized academic achievement scores even when time for physical education is taken from the academic day Slide 33: A caveat: Strategies must be compatible with the primary educational aims of schools! Why This Program? : Why This Program? Planet Health has been evaluated and shown to be effective in a scientific study. It improves student knowledge of nutrition and physical activity. It reduces T.V. viewing time in both boys and girls. It increases fruits and vegetable consumption in girls. It prevents obesity in girls. Gortmaker et al. Arch. of Ped and Adol. Med.,1999; 153:409-418. Let’s take a break!! : Let’s take a break!! Planet Health’s Educational Approach : Planet Health’s Educational Approach Slide 37: Planet Health Promotes... Active Learning Literacy Across the Curriculum Slide 38: Active Learning Slide 39: Use active learning to Build on what they know Slide 41: Each classroom lesson: Addresses Massachusetts learning standards in one of the four academic subjects. Uses content and/or skills specific to one of the academic subjects. Addresses one or more of the health learning standards. Incorporates language skills. Slide 42: Planet Health’s Nutrition and Physical Activity Messages Slide 43: Nutrition Planet Health Goals: Eat Well... Eat five or more fruits and vegetables per day Eat fat in moderation Fitness AND Keep Moving… Be physically active daily or nearly every day Limit screen time to no more than two hours per day Make Space for... What are the benefits of good nutrition and physical activity ? : What are the benefits of good nutrition and physical activity ? Slide 45: Promote normal physical growth and development. Prevent childhood and adolescent health problems like obesity, dental carries, iron deficiency anemia, and even diabetes. Provide nutrients important for brain development, immunity, healing, and healthy skin and eyes, among other functions. Lower the risk of future chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and some cancers. Healthy eating and active living… Slide 46: Healthy eating and active living... Make you strong and fit. Brighten your mood and build a positive self-image. Help you maintain a healthy weight. Are important for learning. Are fun!!! Lesson 32: Pyramid Power Language ArtsBalanced Diet Theme : Lesson 32: Pyramid Power Language ArtsBalanced Diet Theme Ideally students should do this lesson after the student self-assessment lesson and before any other lessons on the Food Guide Pyramid. Reviewing the Food Guide Pyramid : Reviewing the Food Guide Pyramid Planet HealthFruits and Vegetables Message : Planet HealthFruits and Vegetables Message Eat 5 or more fruits and vegetables each day. • Eat at least 2 fruits each day. • Eat at least 3 vegetables each day. - At least 1 should be orange or dark green. Slide 50: Language Arts Lesson 34: The Language of Food Slide 52: Yummy Carrots I eat them day or night, So I can see just right. I love the great taste That never goes to waste. I love them with salad dressing Not having them is so depressing Orange, bright and healthy for me, Which makes me able to see They’re fun to eat cause they crunch And you can have them for lunch. I think carrots are good, for me That’s why I eat them all, you see. -Taft Middle School Student, Brighton MA Pineapples Pineapples can be sweet or sour, Or as yellow as a flower. Eating one is so much fun When it’s shining like the sun. The outside’s like a porcupine, But the inside is quite fine. When you tear it, oh, it rips Softly into juicy strips. Pizza’s good with pineapple on top, Dripping juice like water from a mop. It’s taste is so easy to explain In summer sun or winter rain. -Taft Middle School Student, Brighton MA Slide 53: Science Lesson 49 What’s the Rap on Fat? : What’s the Rap on Fat? Not All Fats are Created Equal Saturated Fat Unsaturated Fat Eating too much increases your risk of developing heart disease. Does not contribute to heart disease Many animal products are high in this type of fat Many plant oils are high in this type of fat What’s the Rap on Fat? : What’s the Rap on Fat? Not All Fats are Created Equal Trans Fats Increase the risk of developing heart disease Created by the hydrogenation of vegetable oils Planet HealthFat Message : Planet HealthFat Message Eat a diet low in saturated fat and moderate in total fat. 10% saturated fat 30% total fat Limit your intake of trans fats Planet Health Inactivity Message : Planet Health Inactivity Message Limit screen time to no more than 2 hours each day. Screen time = TV + videos + movies + video and computer games Doesn’t include school work completed on computer Social Studies Lesson 62: Impact of Technology : Social Studies Lesson 62: Impact of Technology Slide 59: Social Studies Lesson 62: Impact of Technology Slide 60: How do the computer, TV, Internet, and VCR affect the daily physical activity of children your age? Compare your physical activity to the physical activity of children living in the early 1800s. Give several details to support your answer. How do you account for the difference? Compare your free time to the free time of children living in the 1800s How do you account for the difference? Social Studies Lesson 62: Impact of Technology Social Studies Lesson 62:Impact of Technology : Social Studies Lesson 62:Impact of Technology Slide 62: Power Down: Charting Screen Time Slide 63: Power Down: Charting TV Viewing Time Planet Health Activity Message : Planet Health Activity Message Be active daily or nearly every day. • Be moderately active for for at least 30 minutes each day • Be vigorously active at least 20 minutes three times a week • Aim for a total of 60 minutes or more each day. Physical Activity Intensity : Physical Activity Intensity Using the Planet Health Curriculum Guide : Using the Planet Health Curriculum Guide Book Organization : Book Organization Book Introduction PE Curriculum Summary of the Microunits Introduction to the Microunits MicroUnits Part I Part II (Intro to FitCheck) Part III-VIII Classroom Curriculum Introduction to the classroom curriculum Student Self-Assessment Lesson Language Arts Math Science Social Studies Appendices : Appendices Appendix A: Nutrition Resources, p.483 Appendix B: Physical Activity Resources, p.492 Appendix C: Social Studies Resources, p. 494 Appendix D: Power Down Lesson, p. 495 Appendix E: Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, p.508 Slide 71: Implementation Overview Classroom Teachers PE Teachers Student Self-Assessment Power Down Science Lessons Language Arts Lessons Math Lessons 2-3 Classroom Lessons Per Subject Student Self-Assessment FitCheck FitCheck 10-15 Micro-Units Talking to Youth about Nutrition and Physical Activity Habits : Talking to Youth about Nutrition and Physical Activity Habits What would you say if your students said…. : What would you say if your students said…. Why do we need to do these Planet Health lessons? Will Planet Health help me lose weight? I don’t like exercise. Why is it important? I like to watch TV. Why do I need to stop watching TV? How might your concerns/behaviors impact your delivery of the Planet Health material? : How might your concerns/behaviors impact your delivery of the Planet Health material?

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