Powerpoint Presentation 2 24 05 Accommodations for

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Published on October 22, 2007

Author: Cannes

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ACCOMMODATIONS FOR ELLs: THE CONTENT TEACHER-ESL TEACHER PARTNERSHIP:  ACCOMMODATIONS FOR ELLs: THE CONTENT TEACHER-ESL TEACHER PARTNERSHIP Dr. Cheri Micheau, Presenter Please send questions and comments to: phoebejack@aol.com PDE Videoconference Feb. 24, 2005 PRESENTATION OVERVIEW:  PRESENTATION OVERVIEW I. Purposes and audience for the presentation II. The content teacher-ESL teacher partnership and tasks III. General language development for ELLs: Processes and sequences IV. Classroom language learning opportunities V. Why are accommodations needed, and for whom? VI. Principles of accommodation for instruction and assessment & cautions VII. Types of accommodations with examples VIII. Classroom cases, for further discussion I. Purposes and audience for the presentation:  I. Purposes and audience for the presentation Prepare ESL teachers to consult with content teachers on accommodations. Equip content teachers to work with colleagues and teammates on accommodations. Consider types of partnerships that could work at different schools. Review ways in which teachers are already assisting ELLs in content classrooms. I. Purposes and audience for the presentation:  I. Purposes and audience for the presentation Help administrators and teachers make good decisions on policy and procedures for ELLs, including scheduling of cooperative planning time Connect ESL/content standards to accommodation procedures. Consider specific problems in accommodation (through cases, questions and discussion) GOAL: A statewide network of ESL/content teacher teams "spreading the word"!!!! II. The content teacher-ESL teacher partnership and tasks:  II. The content teacher-ESL teacher partnership and tasks ESL teachers' main tasks (working in conjunction with other resource personnel): LANGUAGE LEARNING, ACADEMIC MONITORING, CULTURAL & SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT. Content teachers' main tasks for ELLs: ACADEMIC LEARNING, CULTURAL & SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT. Content-ESL partnership: Teach each other about content and language learning and connect the two areas in classroom, consult on respective curricula, plan for and consult on individual ELLs. Involve the WHOLE SCHOOL, as a team, in working with ELLs. II. Discussion Question :  II. Discussion Question Discuss and evaluate the types of planned and casual (formal and informal) cooperation between ESL and content/classroom teachers that you have been able to foster in your own school building. Consider ways in which the partnership could be strengthened and/or expanded. III. General development for ELLs: Processes and sequences:  III. General development for ELLs: Processes and sequences RECEPTIVE------- PRODUCTIVE SOCIAL PURPOSES-- ACADEMIC PURPOSES CAUTIOUS------- RECKLESS L1/C1 loyalty--------biculturalism----- L2/C2 fanaticism III. General development for ELLs: Processes and sequences:  III. General development for ELLs: Processes and sequences STARTING STRENGTH --- EXPANDING PROGRESS---backtrack- PROGRESS---regress- PROGRESS!!!! AREA OF EMPHASIS/GAPS ACCURACY MEANING USE III. Discussion Question :  III. Discussion Question Consider an ELL (or more than one) with whom you have worked from Year I to Year II and whose progress you have been able to observe. Consider the types of changes you have observed in attitude, ability to cope with content learning, behavior and general language use (quality, quantity). IV. Incidental language learning in the content areas: Examples:  IV. Incidental language learning in the content areas: Examples IV. Discussion Question :  IV. Discussion Question Consider one of the following types of "generic" content lessons (or one with which you are more familiar). Brainstorm with your tablemates some of the ways in which ELLs could learn LANGUAGE skills or U.S. CULTURAL knowledge by participating in this content lesson. (Also, if you can, suggest ways in which a teacher could incorporate information on ELLs' cultures into the lesson.) IV. Discussion Question:  IV. Discussion Question Cooperative science project involving planting seeds and graphing plant growth in small groups Literature circle activity in which students are reading and discussing a picture book (or other type of book) Class trip to the school library to search for books for a project in social studies (or other content area), with help from librarian Teacher presentation on the new food pyramid (through transparencies and students' taking notes), in preparation for a health quiz V. Why are accommodations needed, and for whom?:  V. Why are accommodations needed, and for whom? V-A. WHY accommodate? You want all students to learn! (Many ELLs VERY motivated!) Legal requirements and need for all students to achieve for NCLB. May help struggling NATIVE SPEAKERS, as well. Facilitate the language acquisition progress & provide building blocks of language acquisition: Comprehensible language input, output opportunities, interaction. V. Why are accommodations needed, and for whom?:  V. Why are accommodations needed, and for whom? In order to assess what students KNOW, not just what they do not know and cannot do (for future planning). Self-assessment of teaching: Pare down to the essentials. ELLs often distracted from academics by family, cultural and social upheaval: Need extra attention. Give ELLs hope in difficult adjustment process (in which much has been lost). V-B. HOW DO ELLs VARY, and what do these differences imply for accommodating::  V-B. HOW DO ELLs VARY, and what do these differences imply for accommodating: L1/C1 background and L1 language proficiency. L1 educational level and prior experience with L2 education. Age and age of arrival in U.S. Individual factors: Personality, attitude, behavior & motivation. Family background and home life Personal life in community (social life, work, other institutions) Immigration history and process of adjustment to new setting. V. Discussion Question :  V. Discussion Question Consider the characteristics of the following eighth-grade ELLs. How would they vary in important ways, and what are the implications o f those variations for academic success? (Feel free to use examples of your own students in place of these cases): V. Discussion Question :  V. Discussion Question B, from Thailand: High level of literacy and strong education in L1, interrupted at end of 4th grade; arrived 5th grade; outgoing personality & talkative; advanced English proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, but low proficiency in writing (accuracy); middle-class family in Thailand, U.S.; mediocre student (in effort) with greater potential; living with father & stepmother, but mother in Thailand. V. Discussion Question:  V. Discussion Question C, from Panama: Limited L1 literacy and limited education in L1, interrupted at end of 6th grade; arrived 7th grade; very shy, even withdrawn personality (even in L1); diagnosed in 8th grade with significant hearing loss; extremely limited English proficiency in all skills; middle-class status in U.S. & Panama (mother=entrepreneur); family; does not appear to be interested in achieving in school (little effort); displays behavioral problems and lack of adjustment to school; strong and supportive family; living with father and stepmother (mother in Panama). V. Discussion Question:  V. Discussion Question L, from Argentina: Extremely strong (gifted) student in home country, with high level of literacy and strong education in L1, interrupted at end of 5th grade; spent 6th-grade year in Florida bilingual school; arrived in PA in 7th grade; forceful personality and somewhat outgoing; intermediate-level language skills after one year; middle-class background in home country, working class/poverty background in U.S.; driven to achieve in school, completing ALL assignments, no matter what the difficulty; living with divorced mother and married sister & family in U.S., father in Argentina. VI. General principles of accommodation for instruction and assessment of ELLs:  VI. General principles of accommodation for instruction and assessment of ELLs VI. General principles of accommodation for instruction and assessment of ELLs:  VI. General principles of accommodation for instruction and assessment of ELLs VI-B. Cautions for content teachers:  VI-B. Cautions for content teachers "Gaps" in knowledge/experience of school culture and procedures. DO THEY REALLY UNDERSTAND???!!! Asking for help (and looking stupid, disrespectful). Fatigue & overload! Family circumstances and pressures. School personality (vs. home personality, ESL personality). Social vs. academic priorities, especially for middle and high school. Ambivalence toward first language and culture. Where do I fit in: socially, racially, linguistically, academically….. INVISIBILITY!!!! VI: Discussion Question :  VI: Discussion Question Review the do and don't lists for accommodations on your hand-out or slide, and add some of your own suggestions, based on your personal experience. VII. Types of accommodations and examples:  VII. Types of accommodations and examples A. Adjustments in instructional process 1. Starting point and pre-teaching (and connecting old to new). 2. Scaffolding & presentation style by teacher/peers. 3. Grouping. 4. Modes/media for delivery of instruction, instructional materials. 5. Process (change in number of steps, types of steps). 6. Final product required. VII. Types of accommodations and examples:  VII. Types of accommodations and examples A. Adjustments in instructional process 7. Time. 8. Reinforcement/tutoring at another time. (or community tutors, classroom aides). 9. "Sustained content learning" and thematic/cross-curricular teaching. 10. Predictable routines & sequences. 11. Classroom adjuncts: word wall, graphics, assignment board…. B. Adjustments in content:  B. Adjustments in content 1. Prioritize to essentials (reduce extras) & adjust expectations for new arrivals. 2. Assess background (and work with ESL teacher) & fill gaps in content area. 3. Help students relate new concepts to personal experience and to previously learned content. 4. (where possible) Allow students to use their L1/C1 knowledge to relate new concepts to their lives. C. Adjustments in assessment:  C. Adjustments in assessment 1. More time 2. Mode/media for assessing. 3. Prioritize & assess the essentials. 4. Assess students' knowledge of & experience with various assessment tools. 5. Allow for assistance (open-book, take- home, group test). D. Adjustments to meet affective/psychological/social needs:  D. Adjustments to meet affective/psychological/social needs 1. Buddy up students with helpful, supportive peer. 2. Ensure that ELLs know about special academic and social events (science fair, field trips, parties…). 3. Pay personal attention to student (greet, chat, draw out), and show interest in their progress. 4. Watch for signs of stress (and find help). 5. Create safe, supportive classroom environment (be sure others students are not discriminating against ELLs). E. Linguistic adjustments:  E. Linguistic adjustments 1. Allow bilingual resources & allow student to use L1, where possible. 2. Consider L1 as resource (Have student teach class a few words in L1, for ex.). 3. Consider degree of linguistic difficulty of different classroom procedures, assignments, and phases of lesson. (Discussion vs. notetaking vs. small-group discussion). E. Linguistic adjustments:  E. Linguistic adjustments 4. Adjust TALK when working with ELLs: Limit use of SLANG and informal style. Careful of sarcasm or "kidding" (may not be interpreted correctly). Allow plenty of wait time when asking questions. Ask only one question at a time, and wait for response. (Don't assume silence=can't respond). Slow speed of speech slightly when working one-on-one. Provide definitions of key terms (and write on board). Organize presentations with summary, connections (as any good teacher does). Careful of "over-paraphrasing." Provide a good model: Do NOT produce "foreigner talk." Do NOT speak louder to be understood. F. Cultural adjustments:  F. Cultural adjustments 1. Allow students to do projects that celebrate L1/C1 (if students want to). 2. Make sure classroom rules are known (not just implicit), since classrooms in home country may be VERY different. (Ex.: What to call the teacher?) 3. Make special effort to involve parents in projects, parents' night, etc. (through partnership with ESL teacher?). On the other hand, consider families' economic and social situations when making assignments or when arranging special events. 4. Where possible, employ texts, stories, and examples in teaching that also introduce cultural information from ELLs' various home countries. 5. Invite family members of ELLs to visit class to present cultural information. 6. Get to know students' cultures (and religions) and find out about any cultural rules and taboos that are important to know about (topics, behaviors, beliefs). VII. Discussion Question:  VII. Discussion Question Review the list of types of accommodations (from slide & hand-out). Select a few examples, and consider ways in which you would need to vary the accommodation for different age groups. Also, consider the list in light of the SETTING (type of school district, school policy, faculty characteristics) where these accommodations need to be made. VII. Discussion Question:  VII. Discussion Question VIII. Classroom cases for discussion :  VIII. Classroom cases for discussion Consider some of the following cases, and discuss what types of accommodations would be appropriate and how those accommodations should be implemented. Elementary::  Elementary: A. (in class, end-of-unit social studies project) Students are studying Asia, and in groups they are building a topographical map of a country, using clay and paper. B. (in class, language arts/creative writing) Students have just finished reading a funny children's book, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, as part of a thematic unit on weather. They are now required to write a letter from a resident of the town----animal or person----, describing the unusual events. C. (in class, math word problems) To help students cope with word problems, they are working in groups of three to WRITE their own challenging word problems. Groups will exchange problems and try to solve them, after teacher has checked each group's work. D. (in class, math) Students are learning the concepts of greater than/less than. Using pictures from magazines (glued into their math journals) they are making greater than/less than math sentences. (2nd grade) Middle School::  Middle School: E. (in class, end-of-chapter test) Students are preparing to take an end-of-chapter social studies test on the Europe, consisting of true-false, multiple choice and matching sections. The test has 50 questions total. F. (at home, science project) Students are required to study an animal, to write a one-page report on the animal, and to create a three-dimensional representation of that animal, for science class. G. (in class, PSSA prep) Students are reviewing literary terms that are to be tested on the PSSA (alliteration, simile, metaphor, etc.). In groups students are looking for examples in magazines and in their literature anthology. (Teacher complains that NO ONE is getting this!) High School::  High School: H. (at home, English/public speaking) Students are required to write and prepare to perform in front of class a monologue by one of the characters in a novel they are reading. I. (in class, social studies-English) During Black History Month students in American history class are watching the video, "Eyes on the Prize." They are required to take notes, and there will be a test at the end. The teacher shows a 20-minute segment each day, and students have guiding questions that they are to answer as they listen. J. (in class, science) Students are listening to a teacher's lecture and watching a demonstration on magnetic field. Students are required to take note and to write up of a summary of the magnetic field experiment demonstrated by the teacher.

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