Pollinators

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Information about Pollinators
Education

Published on March 3, 2014

Author: ekillinger1

Source: slideshare.net

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Handouts for N. Bjorklund's presentation 3-4-14

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Pollinators and PollinatorFriendly Plants Natalia Bjorklund Extension Educator Dodge County University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln 1

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Without Pollination…             Alfalfa Peaches Almond Apples Peppermint Apricot Pumpkins Avocado Raspberry/Blackberry Banana Blueberries Strawberries University of Nebraska–Lincoln              Agave Coffee Tomatoes Coconut Vanilla Figs Grapes Grapefruit Kiwifruit Macadamia Nuts Sugarcane Cherries Tea Plants Know how. Know now. Who cares! I don’t like grapes!    No raisins No grape juice No wine!! University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Direct vs Indirect Pollination  Pepper plants flower = are pollinated, = fruit develops = we eat the fruit *Direct*  Bees pollinate alfalfa = Dairy cows eat alfalfa = Dairy cows give us milk, eggs, cheese *Indirect* University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Pollinators of Nebraska      University of Nebraska–Lincoln Flies Beetles Moths/Butterflies Bees Bats, Wind, etc. University of Nebraska–Lincoln 2

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Why do insects feed on flowers? Know how. Know now. Flies    Pollen = Protein Nectar = Carbohydrates University of Nebraska–Lincoln Order Diptera  Diptera = from the Greek di = two, and ptera = wings University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Robber Fly University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Hover Fly University of Nebraska–Lincoln 3

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Fly vs. Bee Know how. Know now. What the flies go for..    Pale and dull to dark brown or purple flowers Strong odor, not always pleasant (to us) Flowers are funnel-shaped Pawpaw University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Beetles  University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Checkered Beetle Order Coleoptera  from the Greek, meaning "sheath"; and, pteron, meaning "wing“  Thus = "sheathed wing", because most beetles have two pairs of wings, the front pair, the "elytra", being hardened and thickened into a sheath-like University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Tumbling Flower Beetle University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Long-horned beetle University of Nebraska–Lincoln 4

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. What the beetles like.. Moths and Butterflies     White, to dull white or green flowers Strongly scented Open during the day University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Clearwing Moth University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Lepidoptera Order  ‘scale’ and ‘wing’ University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Hummingbird Hawk Moth University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Sphinx Moths Fritillaries University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln 5

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Pipevine Swallowtail University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Painted Lady University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Flowers for Moths and Butterflies      In clusters and provide landing platforms White or dull colors for moths, bright colors for butterflies (red, orange, yellow) Open late afternoon or night for moths Open during the day for butterflies Ample nectar producers, with nectar deeply hidden University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Bees  Hymenoptera Order  from the Ancient Greek (hymen): membrane and (pteron): wing; membranous wing University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Nectar Guides Human View University of Nebraska–Lincoln Bee’s View University of Nebraska–Lincoln 6

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Leafcutter bees     Know how. Know now. Leafcutter Bees Leafcutter bees are native bees Leafcutter bees are not aggressive Leafcutter bees nest in soft, rotted wood or in the stems of large, pithy plants, like raspberries Collect pollen on undersides of their abdomen University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Orchard Mason Bee University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln 7

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Bumblebees University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln 8

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Honeybees University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Sweat Bees Know how. Know now. Sweat Bees      University of Nebraska–Lincoln Sweat bees have diverse nest types The area around the clusters sometimes is excavated Cells usually are lined with a waxy substance likely extruded from the bee's Dufour's gland (a gland found on the underside of the abdomen). About half of the species are dull to metallic black, with the remaining species being metallic green, blue or purple Females carry pollen on the tibia and femur of their hind legs University of Nebraska–Lincoln 9

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. European Wool Carder Bee University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Carpenter Bee University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln 10

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Squash Bee Know how. Know now. For the Bees..        University of Nebraska–Lincoln Lots of nectar Brightly colored petals that are often blue or yellow Sweetly fragrant Open in daytime Landing platforms Often bilaterally symmetrical Flowers that are often tubular with nectar at base of tube University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Three types Pollinator-Friendly Plants    Nectar sources Pollen sources Larval food sources University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Important things to remember     Larvae eat plant material! But larvae turn into other things!!! Plant material is just part of a pollinator-friendly habitat  Water source  Chemical usage  Open soil Multi-season plantings University of Nebraska–Lincoln ‘Weeds’ that are great for pollinators University of Nebraska–Lincoln 11

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Bird’s Foot Trefoil Clover University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Chickweed Dandelion University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Henbit University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Henbit University of Nebraska–Lincoln 12

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Speedwell Wild Carrot University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Chicory ‘Garden’ plants for pollinators University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Spring  Woody:  Red Maple  Redbud  Black Locust  Tuliptree  Rhododendron  Alder  Cherry  Common Hackberry  Dogwood University of Nebraska–Lincoln  Cotoneaster  Elm  Hazelnut  Hawthorn  Ohio Buckeye  Pear  Plum  Willow  Serviceberry  Sycamore  Ash  Yellowwood Know how. Know now. Spring, continued  Herbaceous  Ajuga  Crocus  Dandelion  Clover  Henbit  Lungwort  Mustards  Candytuft University of Nebraska–Lincoln 13

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Summer Know how. Know now. Summer, continued  Woody:  Sourwood  Butterfly bush  Linden  Chokeberry  Blackberry  Blackhaw viburnum  Catalpa  Elderberry  Raspberry  Roses  Snowberry University of Nebraska–Lincoln  Herbaceous  Beebalm  Sunflower  Purple coneflower  Phlox  Wood Mint  Germander  Cup Rosinweed  Milkweed  Partridge Pea University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. More summer….  Still herbaceous..  Leadwort  Mallow  Oregano  Pot Marigold    (Calendula) Russian Sage Figwort Self-heal  Thyme  Mountain Bluet  Sages  Verbena bonariensis*  Thistle* Know how. Know now. Butterfly larva and their host   Know how. Know now. Fall University of Nebraska–Lincoln         Alyssum  Viper’s Bugloss  Joe-pye weed  Borage  Prairie Coneflower  Catmint  Chives  Globe Thistle  Horehound  Lavender  Herbaceous  Asters  Goldenrod  Sweet Autumn Clematis University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Black Swallowtail Aster – Pearl Crescent Birch -- Mourning Cloak Clover – Sulphurs, Hairstreaks Dill -- Black Swallowtail Cottonwood -- Tiger Swallowtail Hibiscus -- Checkered Skipper Hollyhock -- Painted Lady, Comma, Checkered Skipper Parsley – Black Swallowtail Snapdragon -- Buckeye University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln 14

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Common Buckeye University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Mourning Cloak University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Viceroy Know how. Know now. Things to Remember..     University of Nebraska–Lincoln Native plants are best.. Especially for native insects Single flowers are usually preferred over doubles Flowers that have multiple flowers per stem give more food in a small space Often varieties or cultivars have been bred for us, not pollinators  Purchase straight species when possible  i.e. Alcea rosea (hollyhock) rather than Alcea rosea ‘Charter’s Red’ University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Other Resources Bee Corps         Caterpillars of Eastern North America: A Guide to Identification and Natural History (Princeton Field Guides) Attracting Native Pollinators: The Xerces Society Guide, Protecting North America's Bees and Butterflies Field Guide to Wildflowers of Nebraska and the Great Plains: Second Edition Xerces Society Pollinator Partnership University of Nebraska–Lincoln Contact me! 402.727.2775 natalia.bjorklund@unl.edu University of Nebraska–Lincoln 15

3/3/2014 Know how. Know now. Know how. Know now. Questions? Extension is a Division of the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska– Lincoln cooperating with the Counties and the United States Department of Agriculture. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension educational programs abide with the nondiscrimination policies of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and the United States Department of Agriculture. University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Nebraska–Lincoln 16

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