Political Parties on Web 2.0

60 %
40 %
Information about Political Parties on Web 2.0

Published on June 17, 2008

Author: DrLilleker

Source: slideshare.net

Description

A conference paper co-written with Nigel Jackson (Plymouth), key questions asked were how parties use Web 2.0 and whether they embrace or adapt the technologies. Talked of the emergence of the political strategists' creation of Web 1.5, partial use of the tools but no real interaction.

Politicians and Web 2.0: the current bandwagon or changing the mindset? Dr Darren G. Lilleker (University of Bournemouth) Dr Nigel A. Jackson (University of Plymouth)

“ Web 2.0 is the network as platform, spanning all connected devices: Web 2.0 applications are those that make the most of intrinsic advantages of that platform: delivering software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it, consuming and remixing data from multiple sources, including individual users, while providing their own data and services in a form that allows remixing by others, creating network effects through an ‘architecture of participation’ and going beyond the page metaphor of Web 1.0 to deliver rich user experiences” (O’Reilly, 2005) About co-production via networking Necessitates shifts in organisational thinking?

“ Web 2.0 is the network as platform, spanning all connected devices: Web 2.0 applications are those that make the most of intrinsic advantages of that platform: delivering software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it, consuming and remixing data from multiple sources, including individual users, while providing their own data and services in a form that allows remixing by others, creating network effects through an ‘architecture of participation’ and going beyond the page metaphor of Web 1.0 to deliver rich user experiences” (O’Reilly, 2005)

About co-production via networking

Necessitates shifts in organisational thinking?

Parties and Web 2.0 Connections to voters via networks Co-production of policy Democratic Representation But Politicians lack specific networks Networks can be built Existing networks allow interaction

Connections to voters via networks

Co-production of policy

Democratic Representation

But

Politicians lack specific networks

Networks can be built

Existing networks allow interaction

Research Questions To what extent electoral party political communicators are using the range of available online communication tools; To what extent political communicators are encouraging interaction and public input and participation through their online communicational presence; To ascertain whether we can observe a qualitative or quantitative shift in communication strategy; To evaluate whether Web 2.0 can, in reality, offer the potential for political communicators that the literature suggests and, if so, if it is political communication or the Web 1.0 and 2.0 that is being adapted and transformed.

To what extent electoral party political communicators are using the range of available online communication tools;

To what extent political communicators are encouraging interaction and public input and participation through their online communicational presence;

To ascertain whether we can observe a qualitative or quantitative shift in communication strategy;

To evaluate whether Web 2.0 can, in reality, offer the potential for political communicators that the literature suggests and, if so, if it is political communication or the Web 1.0 and 2.0 that is being adapted and transformed.

Testing Interactivity (Fober, Foltz and Pugliese, 2007)

An Operationalised Model (Malagon, 2008)

Use of Web 2.0 tools on websites/social media

Use of Web 2.0 tools by party type

Use of tools by party type and site type

Interactivity on social networks by party type

Interactivity on websites/blogs by party type

Web 1.0/2.0 or Web 1.5

Concluding Thoughts Early stages in adoption of Web 2.0 The architecture is in place, but gathering graffiti rather than a population of producers A mixture of participation and monologic communication Threats maybe seen to outweigh the benefits Websites attract the highly involved, but social networks largely reject their presence

Early stages in adoption of Web 2.0

The architecture is in place, but gathering graffiti rather than a population of producers

A mixture of participation and monologic communication

Threats maybe seen to outweigh the benefits

Websites attract the highly involved, but social networks largely reject their presence

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Norwegian Parties and Web 2.0 - Journal of Information ...

From Networked Nominee to Networked Nation: Examining the Impact of Web 2.0 and Social Media on Political Participation and Civic Engagement in the 2008 ...
Read more

Political Parties and Web 2.0: The Liberal Democrat ...

Political Parties and Web 2.0: The Liberal Democrat Perspective ponl_1373 105..113 Darren G. Lilleker ... POLITICAL PARTIES AND WEB 2.0 ...
Read more

Political parties on Web 2.0: The Norwegian Case | Øyvind ...

This paper analyses how Norwegian political parties have handled the appearance of Web 2.0. It focuses on the campaign for the local elections in September ...
Read more

Web 2.0: the new election superweapon | Politics | The ...

... how well do political parties understand new media technology? ... Web search. LABOUR: The party came late to the manipulation of Google ... Web 2.0 ...
Read more

Political parties and web 2.0 tools: A shift in ... - DeepDyve

Read "Political parties and web 2.0 tools: A shift in power or a new digital Bandwagon?" on DeepDyve - Instant access to the journals you need!
Read more

Political Parties and Web 2.0: The Liberal Democrat ...

Political Parties and Web 2.0: The Liberal Democrat Perspective: POLITICAL PARTIES AND WEB 2.0
Read more

Political participation and web 2.0 in Europe: A case ...

Political participation and web 2.0 in ... offline’ world and the use of web 2.0 for political ... of Facebook by political parties for ...
Read more

Political participation and web 2.0 in Europe ... - DeepDyve

Political participation and web 2.0 in Europe: A case study of Facebook Vesnic-Alujevic, Lucia Highlights Obtained profile of an average participant ...
Read more

Gigaom Web 2.0 gives birth to Politics 2.0

Web 2.0 gives birth to Politics 2.0. ... Washington’s political operative and ... All of them have been elected to someone in the two major parties, ...
Read more

Political parties and web 2.0 tools: A shift in power or a ...

The Impact upon Comprehension and Reading Tasks of Preservice Elementary Teachers Using a Web 2.0 Reading Extension
Read more